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Summary The philosophy of neuroscience includes applications of neuroscience to philosophical problems as well as philosophical investigations of neuroscience. The application of neuroscience to philosophical problems (such as problems in philosophy of mind) is sometimes referred to as "neurophilosophy". The philosophical investigation of neuroscience is a sub-discipline of the philosophy of science.
Key works See the pioneering Churchland 1986 for an early overview of key themes in philosophy of neuroscience. Anthologies of note include Bickle 2009 and Bechtel et al 2001.
Introductions For a concise introductory overview, see Bickle et al 2006. See also Mandik & Brook 2007 and Bechtel et al 2001.
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  1. André Aleman & René S. Kahn (2002). Top-Down Modulation, Emotion, and Hallucination. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):578-578.
    We argue that the pivotal role assigned by Northoff to the principle of top-down modulation in catatonia might successfully be applied to other symptoms of schizophrenia, for example, hallucinations. Second, we propose that Northoff's account would benefit from a more comprehensive analysis of the cognitive level of explanation. Finally, contrary to Northoff, we hypothesize that “top-down modulation” might play as important a role as “horizontal modulation” in affective-behavioral alterations.
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  2. Pereira Alfredo Jr, M. A. Pereira & Fábio Augusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183-192.
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  3. George F. Alheid & Lennart Heimer (1987). The “Extended Amygdala” as a Receptor Area for Psychotherapeutic Drugs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):208.
  4. Garland E. Allen (2004). A Pact with the Embryo: Viktor Hamburger, Holistic and Mechanistic Philosophy in the Development of Neuroembryology, 1927-1955. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):421-475.
    Viktor Hamburger was a developmental biologist interested in the ontogenesis of the vertebrate nervous system. A student of Hans Spemann at Freiburg in the 1920s, Hamburger picked up a holistic view of the embryo that precluded him from treating it in a reductionist way; at the same time, he was committed to a materialist and analytical approach that eschewed any form of vitalism or metaphysics. This paper explores how Hamburger walked this thin line between mechanistic reductionism and metaphysical vitalism in (...)
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  5. John Allen (1997). Pragmatic Neuropsychology A Review of The Neurological Side Of Neuropsychology by Richard Cytowic. [REVIEW] Psyche 3.
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  6. T. Allison, A. Puce & G. McCarthy (2000). The Neurobiology of Social Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4:267-279.
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  7. Wayne Andersen (2006). The Four Corners of Our Brain. The European Legacy 11 (2):155-169.
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  8. C. Arnold Anderson (1968). University Planning in an Underdeveloped Country. Minerva 7 (1-2):36-51.
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  9. Jack R. Anderson (1996). Review: Beyond Parallel Distributed Processing. [REVIEW] Behavior and Philosophy 24 (2):191 - 194.
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  10. V. Anderson, H. Levin & R. Jacobs (2002). Developmental and Acquired Lesions of the Frontal Lobes in Children: Neuropsychological Implications. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press
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  11. B. Andrieu (2001). Research on the Premature Brain as a Multidisciplinary Model Between 1942 and 1962 at the Unique Baudelocque in Paris. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (2):259-277.
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  12. Daniel Ansari (2012). Culture and Education: New Frontiers in Brain Plasticity. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):93-95.
  13. Daniel Ansari & Donna Coch (2006). Bridges Over Troubled Waters: Education and Cognitive Neuroscience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):146-151.
  14. Daniel Ansari & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (2002). Atypical Trajectories of Number Development: A Neuroconstructivist Perspective. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):511-516.
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  15. Alessandro Antonietti & Antonella Corradini, Mirror Neurons: Some Critical Remarks.
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  16. Otto Appenzeller (1969). The Vegetative Nervous System. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 427-535.
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  17. E. Arabogly (1985). Aron, Raymond in the Mirror and Beyond the Mirror of His Memoirs. Filosoficky Casopis 33 (4):579-598.
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  18. István Aranyosi (2013). The Peripheral Mind: Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers of mind, both in the conceptual analysis tradition and in the empirical informed school, have been implicitly neglecting the potential conceptual role of the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) in understanding sensory and perceptual states. Instead, the philosophical as well as the neuroscientific literature has been assuming that it is the Central Nervous System (CNS) alone, and more exactly the brain, that should prima facie be taken as conceptually and empirically crucial for a philosophical analysis of such states This is (...)
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  19. M. Arbib, P. Érdi & J. Szentagothai (2000). Structure, Function, and Dynamics: An Integrated Approach to Neural Organization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23:513-571.
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  20. Michael Arbib (1995). Introducing the Neuron. In Michael A. Arbib (ed.), Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. MIT Press 4--11.
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  21. Michael A. Arbib (2000). Warren McCulloch's Search for the Logic of the Nervous System. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (2):193-216.
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  22. Arnaldo Arduini (1987). Principles of Theoretical Neurophysiology.
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  23. Isabel Arend (2005). Dividiendo la atención entre dos objetivos: una revisión sobre el efecto de piscar atencional. Aletheia 22:7-22.
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  24. Margot E. Arntfield & Derek van der Kooy (2011). Β‐Cell Evolution: How the Pancreas Borrowed From the Brain. Bioessays 33 (8):582-587.
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  25. Robert Arp (2005). Selectivity, Integration, and the Psycho-Neuro-Biological Continuum. Journal of Mind and Behavior 26 (1-2):35-64.
    An important insight derived from Kant about the workings of the mind is that conscious activity involves both the selection of relevant information, and the integration of that information, so as to form mental coherency. The conscious mind can then utilize this coherent information to solve problems, invent tools, synthesize concepts, produce works of art, and the like. In this paper, it will be suggested that just as biological processes, in general, exhibit selective and integrative functions, and just as visual (...)
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  26. Valtteri Arstila & Dan Lloyd (eds.) (2014). Subjective Time: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Temporality. The MIT Press.
    Our awareness of time and temporal properties is a constant feature of conscious life. Subjective temporality structures and guides every aspect of behavior and cognition, distinguishing memory, perception, and anticipation. This milestone volume brings together research on temporality from leading scholars in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, defining a new field of interdisciplinary research. The book's thirty chapters include selections from classic texts by William James and Edmund Husserl and new essays setting them in historical context; contemporary philosophical accounts of lived (...)
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  27. James B. Ashbrook & Carol Rausch Albright (1997). The Humanizing Brain Where Religion and Neuroscience Meet.
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  28. F. Gregory Ashby & M. Crossley (2010). The Neurobiology of Categorization. In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. OUP Oxford 75--98.
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  29. Heather Ashton (2002). Delirium and Hallucinations. In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. John Benjamins 181-203.
  30. K. T. E. Ashwell & G. Paxinos (2000). The Brain's Anatomy. In Evian Gordon (ed.), Integrative Neuroscience. Harwood Academic Publishers
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  31. David Attwell (1989). Modelling Brain Functions. Organization of Neural Networks: Structures and Models. Edited by W. Von Seelen, G. Shaw and U. M. Leinhos. VCH, Weinheim, 1988. DM 135. [REVIEW] Bioessays 11 (5):156-156.
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  32. James H. Austin (2011). Meditating Selflessly: Practical Neural Zen. The MIT Press.
    Based on the Zen philosophy about focusing away from the self, a guide to "neural Zen" meditative practices draws on recent findings in brain research to outline recommendations for various methods of pursuing a balanced, selfless state of ...
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  33. James H. Austin (2006). Zen-Brain Reflections. The MIT Press.
    This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate states of consciousness.Zen-Brain Reflections takes up (...)
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  34. James H. Austin (1992). Dimensions of Meaning: A Zen/Brain Perspective. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 15:60-76.
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  35. Randall E. Auxier (2007). It's All Dark : The Eclipse of the Damaged Brain. In George A. Reisch (ed.), Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful with That Axiom, Eugene! Open Court
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  36. Ll Avant, Mw Oboyle, Aa Thieman, M. Tepin & M. March (1990). Perceptual Processing of Pattern Goodness by Left and Right Hemispheres. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):483-483.
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  37. Ll Avant, Aa Thieman & Mb Tepin (1991). Prerecognition Pattern Processing by Left and Right Hemispheres. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):486-486.
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  38. A. Ayali, E. Fuchs, Y. Zilberstein, A. Robinson, O. Shefi, E. Hulata, I. Baruchi & E. Ben‐Jacob (2004). Contextual Regularity and Complexity of Neuronal Activity: From Stand‐Alone Cultures to Task‐Performing Animals. Complexity 9 (6):25-32.
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  39. Sheeva Azma (2013). Poverty and the Developing Brain: Insights From Neuroimaging. Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 4 (1).
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  40. Bernard J. Baars (1998). Metaphors of Consciousness and Attention in the Brain. Trends in Neurosciences 21:58-62.
  41. Bernard J. Baars, Thomas Zoega Ramsoy & Steven Laureys (2003). Brain, Conscious Experience, and the Observing Self. Trends in Neurosciences 26 (12):671-5.
    Conscious perception, like the sight of a coffee cup, seems to involve the brain identifying a stimulus. But conscious input activates more brain regions than are needed to identify coffee cups and faces. It spreads beyond sensory cortex to frontoparietal association areas, which do not serve stimulus identification as such. What is the role of those regions? Parietal cortex support the ‘first person perspective’ on the visual world, unconsciously framing the visual object stream. Some prefrontal areas select and interpret conscious (...)
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  42. A. Babloyantz (1995). Thus We Way Conclude That Cognitive States of Human Brain Correspond to High Dimensional Dynamics Whereas, as the Cognitive Capacity Diminishes so Does the Fractal Dimension Therefore the Coherence of the Neuronal Network Increases. In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & A. R. Peacocke (eds.), Chaos and Complexity. Vatican Observatory Publications 107.
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  43. Paul Bach-Y.-Rita, Mitchell Tyler & Kurt Kaczamarek (2003). Seeing with the Brain. International Journal Of Human-Computer Interaction 15 (2):285-295.
  44. Peter Bachman, Tyrone D. Cannon & Editors (2005). Cognitive and Neuroscience Aspects of Thought Disorder. In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge Univ Pr 493--526.
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  45. William Badecker & Alfonso Caramazza (1985). On Considerations of Method and Theory Governing the Use of Clinical Categories in Neurolinguistics and Cognitive Neuropsychology: The Case Against Agrammatism. Cognition 20 (2):97-125.
  46. Bernard Baertschi (2011). Neurosciences et responsabilité morale: Un argument en faveur du compatibilisme. Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 143 (3):257-272.
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  47. Martin Bähler, Fabio Benfenati, Flavia Valtorta & Paul Greengard (1990). The Synapsins and the Regulation of Synaptic Function. Bioessays 12 (6):259-263.
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  48. Thomas Baldwin (1990). Reflections on the Brain, the Mind and the Soul. No Ghost in the Machine (1989). By Rodney Cotterill. Heinemann: London. Pp. 256, £14.95. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (10):508-509.
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  49. Deanna M. Barch (2002). Disordered Cognitive Control: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press 428.
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  50. Stephen Barker (2001). The Mirror and the Dagger. In Steve Martinot (ed.), Maps and Mirrors: Topologies of Art and Politics. Northwestern University Press 83.
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