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Philosophy of Physical Science

Edited by Hans Halvorson (Princeton University)
Assistant editor: Joshua Luczak (University of Western Ontario, Georgetown University)
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  1. added 2016-08-27
    Raffaele Pisano (2016). Tunnel Visions: The Rise and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider. [REVIEW] Centaurus:271-273.
    Michael Riordan, Lillian Hoddeson and Adrienne W. Kolb, Tunnel Visions: The Rise and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), xiii+448 pp.
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  2. added 2016-08-27
    Nathan Lackey & Cory Wright (2016). Review of Poincaré, Philosopher of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 36 (4):157-159.
  3. added 2016-08-27
    Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti (2016). A Newtonian Tale Details on Notes and Proofs in Geneva Edition of Newton's Principia. BSHM-Journal of the British Society for the History of Mathematics:1-19.
    Based on our research regarding the relationship between physics and mathematics in HPS, and recently on Geneva Edition of Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1739–42) by Thomas Le Seur (1703–70) and François Jacquier (1711–88), in this paper we present some aspects of such Edition: a combination of editorial features and scientific aims. The proof of Proposition XLIII is presented and commented as a case study.
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  4. added 2016-08-26
    Antonio Vassallo & Michael Esfeld (2016). Leibnizian Relationalism for General Relativistic Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics.
    An ontology of Leibnizian relationalism, consisting in distance relations among sparse matter points and their change only, is well recognized as a serious option in the context of classical mechanics. In this paper, we investigate how this ontology fares when it comes to general relativistic physics. Using a Humean strategy, we regard the gravitational field as a means to represent the overall change in the distance relations among point particles in a way that achieves the best combination of being simple (...)
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  5. added 2016-08-25
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  6. added 2016-08-22
    Dois Koh, Divination by Science.
    This paper attempts to decipher what we really mean when we use the word "Science" by briefly exploring the criterion of "predictive power" with respect to the demarcation problem. It is essentially an articulation of Lakatos' view of Science and attempts to show that predictive power is quintessential to science.
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  7. added 2016-08-21
    Marco Mamone-Capria (forthcoming). On the Fundamental Theorem of the Theory of Relativity. Foundations of Physics:1-33.
    A new formulation of what may be called the “fundamental theorem of the theory of relativity” is presented and proved in -space-time, based on the full classification of special transformations and the corresponding velocity addition laws. A system of axioms is introduced and discussed leading to the result, and a study is made of several variants of that system. In particular the status of the group axiom is investigated with respect to the condition of the two-way isotropy of light. Several (...)
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  8. added 2016-08-18
    Alfred Gierer (1988). Physics, Life and Mind: The Scope and Limitations of Science. In Iain Paul Jan Fennema (ed.), Second European Conference on Science and Religion. Kluwer Academic Publishers 61-71.
    What, precisely, are the ‘changing perspectives on reality’ in contemporary scientific thought? The topics of the lecture are the scope and the limits of science with emphasis on the physical foundations of biology. The laws of physics in general and the physics of molecules in particular form the basis for explaining the mechanism of reproduction, the generation of structure and form in the course of the development of the individual organism, the evolution of the diversity and complexity of organisms by (...)
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  9. added 2016-08-17
    Alfred Gierer (2000). On Modern Science, Human Cognition, and Cultural Diversity. In Preprint series, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. MPI for the History of Science Preprint 137, 1-16.
    The development of modern science has depended strongly on specific features of the cultures involved; however, its results are widely and trans-culturally accepted and applied. The science and technology of electricity provides a particularly interesting example. It emerged as a specific product of post-Renaissance Europe, rooted in the Greek philosophical tradition that encourages explanations of nature in theoretical terms. It did not evolve in China presumably because such encouragement was missing. The trans-cultural acceptance of modern science and technology is postulated (...)
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  10. added 2016-08-16
    L. S. Schulman (forthcoming). Special States Demand a Force for the Observer. Foundations of Physics:1-24.
    The “special state” understanding of the measurement process is presented, namely there is no “measurement process,” only unitary time evolution. However, in contrast to the many worlds interpretation, there is only one world. How this can be accomplished and how statistical mechanics is changed as a result are also discussed. The focus though is on experimental tests of this theory and the in-principle realization that this can give rise to feasible experimental tests. Those tests rely on the particular feature of (...)
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  11. added 2016-08-16
    Charles T. Wolfe (2016). Review of Fumie Kawamura, Diderot Et la Chimie: Science, Pensée Et Écriture. [REVIEW] H-France Reviews 16.
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  12. added 2016-08-15
    Alfonso Leon Guillen Gomez (2010). Spacetime Structural Property of Matter in Movement. In Petrov`s Symposium Contributed papers. Kazan University 101-109.
    The theoretical contradiction between General Relativity and Quantum Gravity about gravity was ended, since spacetime is not structural property of the gravitational fi eld like Einstein said. Exactly spacetime is the structural geometric property of the matter and energy that it gives their geometric dimensions. Thus, spacetime is not continent of the matter (Substantialism), since it is contained. Neither is the category of the relations between material bodies or between their events (Relationalism) since is not relational property; spacetime is structural (...)
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  13. added 2016-08-14
    Alfonso Leon Guillen Gomez, Gravity is a Quantum Force.
    The General Relativity understands gravity like inertial movement of the free fall of the bodies in curved spacetime of Lorentz. The law of inertia of Newton would be particular case of the inertial movement of the bodies in the spacetime flat of Euclid. But, in the step, of the particular to the general, breaks the law of inertia of Galilei since recovers the rectilinear uniform movement but not the repose state, unless the bodies have undergone their union, although, the curved (...)
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  14. added 2016-08-14
    Alexander Cox, Christopher Nebelecky, Ronald Rudnicki, William Tagliaferri, John L. Crassidis & Barry Smith (2016). The Space Object Ontology. In 19th International Conference on Information Fusion (FUSION 2016). IEEE
    Achieving space domain awareness requires the identification, characterization, and tracking of space objects. Storing and leveraging associated space object data for purposes such as hostile threat assessment, object identification, and collision prediction and avoidance present further challenges. Space objects are characterized according to a variety of parameters including their identifiers, design specifications, components, subsystems, capabilities, vulnerabilities, origins, missions, orbital elements, patterns of life, processes, operational statuses, and associated persons, organizations, or nations. The Space Object Ontology provides a consensus-based realist framework (...)
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  15. added 2016-08-11
    David Ellerman (2016). Quantum Mechanics Over Sets: A Pedagogical Model with Non-Commutative Finite Probability Theory as its Quantum Probability Calculus. Synthese 2016:1-34.
    This paper shows how the classical finite probability theory (with equiprobable outcomes) can be reinterpreted and recast as the quantum probability calculus of a pedagogical or toy model of quantum mechanics over sets (QM/sets). There have been several previous attempts to develop a quantum-like model with the base field of ℂ replaced by ℤ₂. Since there are no inner products on vector spaces over finite fields, the problem is to define the Dirac brackets and the probability calculus. The previous attempts (...)
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  16. added 2016-08-10
    Mesut Kavak (2016). On the Uncertainty Principle. American Journal of Physics 4 (4):90-123.
    Analysis of the laws which form, direct universe and of the interacting elements in the interactions emerging by these laws. Forming the theoretical, philosophical infrastructure of the some physical concepts and phenomena such as kinetic energy, uncertainty, length contraction, relative energy transformations, gravity, time and light speed to understand universe better manner as well as possible. Some informations about re-derivation of Planck constants, faster than Light, interstellar Jump and instant communication, length contraction, imaginary time, time travel, real black hole radiuses, (...)
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  17. added 2016-08-07
    Praloy Das & Subir Ghosh (forthcoming). Particle on a Torus Knot: A Hamiltonian Analysis. Foundations of Physics:1-17.
    We have studied the dynamics and symmetries of a particle constrained to move in a torus knot. The Hamiltonian system turns out to be Second Class in Dirac’s formulation and the Dirac brackets yield novel noncommutative structures. The equations of motion are obtained for a path in general where the knot is present in the particle orbit but it is not restricted to a particular torus. We also study the motion when it is restricted to a specific torus. The rotational (...)
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  18. added 2016-08-04
    Stephen Puryear (2016). Evil as Privation and Leibniz's Rejection of Empty Space. In Wenchao Li (ed.), "Für Unser Glück oder das Glück Anderer": Vortrage des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses. Georg Olms 3:481-89.
    I argue that Leibniz's treatment of void or empty space in the appendix to his fourth letter to Clarke conflicts with the way he elsewhere treats (metaphysical) evil, insofar as he allows that God has created a world with the one kind of privation (evil), while insisting that God would not have created a world with the other kind of privation (void). I consider three respects in which the moral case might be thought to differ relevantly from the physical one, (...)
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  19. added 2016-07-31
    Mauro Dorato, Bohr’s Relational Holism and the Classical-Quantum Interaction.
    In this paper I present and critically discuss the main strategies that Bohr used and could have used to fend off the charge that his interpretation does not provide a clear-cut distinction between the classical and the quantum domain. In particular, in the first part of the paper I reassess the main arguments used by Bohr to advocate the indispensability of a classical framework to refer to quantum phenomena. In this respect, by using a distinction coming from an apparently unrelated (...)
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  20. added 2016-07-31
    Alfonso Leon Guillen Gomez, Gravity is a Quantum Force.
    The General Relativity understands gravity like inertial movement of the free fall of the bodies in curved spacetime of Lorentz. The law of inertia of Newton would be particular case of the inertial movement of the bodies in the spacetime flat of Euclid. But, in the step, of the particular to the general, breaks the law of inertia of Galilei since recovers the rectilinear uniform movement but not the repose state, unless the bodies have undergone their union, although, the curved (...)
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  21. added 2016-07-30
    L. S. Schulman & M. G. E. da Luz (forthcoming). Looking for the Source of Change. Foundations of Physics:1-7.
    In most theories of the quantum measurement process changes in an observer’s perception of a state can take place without forces, as for example if a state is prepared in an eigenstate of \ but \ is measured. In the “special state” theory any change in wave function requires forces. This allows experimental tests to distinguish these ideas and in the present article two examples of such tests are considered. The first is a kind of double Stern–Gerlach experiment, the second (...)
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  22. added 2016-07-28
    Alfonso Leon Guillen Gomez, Gravity is a Force.
    The General Relativity understands gravity like inertial movement of the free fall of the bodies in curved spacetime of Lorentz. The law of inertia of Newton would be particular case of the inertial movement of the bodies in the spacetime flat of Euclid. But, in the step, of the particular to the general, breaks the law of inertia of Galilei since recovers the rectilinear uniform movement but not the repose state, unless the bodies have undergone their union, although, the curved (...)
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  23. added 2016-07-27
    Alfonso Leon Guillen Gomez, Gravity is a Force.
    The General Relativity understands gravity like inertial movement of the free fall of the bodies in curved spacetime of Lorentz. The law of inertia of Newton would be particular case of the inertial movement of the bodies in the spacetime flat of Euclid. But, in the step, of the particular to the general, breaks the law of inertia of Galilei since recovers the rectilinear uniform movement but not the repose state, unless the bodies have undergone their union, although, the curved (...)
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  24. added 2016-07-26
    Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). In Praise of Natural Philosophy: A Revolution for Thought and Life. McGill-Queen's University Press.
    Nicholas Maxwell, 2017, In Praise of Natural Philosophy: A Revolution for Thought and Life, McGill-Queen's University Press: Montreal, Canada. The central thesis of this book is that we need to reform philosophy and join it to science to recreate a modern version of natural philosophy; we need to do this in the interests of rigour, intellectual honesty, and so that science may serve the best interests of humanity. The book seeks to redraw our intellectual landscape. It leads to a transformation (...)
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  25. added 2016-07-23
    Ilexa Yardley, The Identity of One: Conservation of the Circle.
    The line connecting everything to everything is both diameter and circumference of a circle. Thus, complementarity is the basis for identity (duplicity is the basis for a unit).
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  26. added 2016-07-23
    Akinbo Ojo (2016). Hypotheses Fingo. Booktango.
    Hypotheses Fingo is the culmination of over twenty years of following developments in theoretical physics, enriched with correspondence exchanged with leading names in the field. A postulate and four hypotheses are formulated which remove the infinities afflicting the cosmological singularities of Hawking and Penrose, resolve Zeno's paradoxes of motion and find the elusive elastic solid nature of space that makes it possible for light to be transmitted as transverse waves. Relativity - Special, General and Galilean and that which Isaac Newton (...)
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  27. added 2016-07-22
    Keying Guan, Important Notes on Lyapunov Exponents.
    It is shown that the famous Lyapunov exponents cannot be used as the numerical characteristic for distinguishing different kinds of attractors, such as the equilibrium point, the limit closed curve, the stable torus and the strange attractor.
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  28. added 2016-07-22
    Jan Heylen (forthcoming). Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing? A Logical Investigation. Erkenntnis:1-29.
    From Leibniz to Krauss philosophers and scientists have raised the question as to why there is something rather than nothing. Why-questions request a type of explanation and this is often thought to include a deductive component. With classical logic in the background only trivial answers are forthcoming. With free logics in the background, be they of the negative, positive or neutral variety, only question-begging answers are to be expected. The same conclusion is reached for the modal version of the Question, (...)
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  29. added 2016-07-22
    Stephen Strogatz (2001). Nonlinear Dynamics And Chaos: With Applications To Physics, Biology, Chemistry, And Engineering (Studies in Nonlinearity). Westview Press.
    This textbook is aimed at newcomers to nonlinear dynamics and chaos, especially students taking a first course in the subject. The presentation stresses analytical methods, concrete examples and geometric intuition. The theory is developed systematically, starting with first-order differential equations and their bifurcations, followed by phase plane analysis, limit cycles and their bifurcations, and culminating with the Lorenz equations, chaos, iterated maps, period doubling, renormalization, fractals, and strange attractors.A unique feature of the book is its emphasis on applications. These include (...)
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  30. added 2016-07-22
    H. D. I. Abarbanel (1992). Local Lyapunov Exponents Computed From Observed Data. Journal of Nonlinear Science 2 (3):343-365.
    We develop methods for determining local Lyapunov exponents from observations of a scalar data set. Using average mutual information and the method of false neighbors, we reconstruct a multivariate time series, and then use local polynomial neighborhood-to-neighborhood maps to determine the phase space partial derivatives required to compute Lyapunov exponents. In several examples we demonstrate that the methods allow one to accurately reproduce results determined when the dynamics is known beforehand. We present a new recursive QR decomposition method for finding (...)
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  31. added 2016-07-22
    Barry Saltzman (1962). Finite Amplitude Free Convection as an Initial Value Problem. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 19 (329).
    The Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations are reduced to a two-dimensional form governing “roll” convection between two free surfaces maintained at a constant temperature difference. These equations are then transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations governing the time variations of the double-Fourier coefficients for the motion and temperature fields. Non-linear transfer processes are retained and appear as quadratic interactions between the Fourier coefficients. Energy and heat transfer relations appropriate to this Fourier resolution, and a numerical method for solution from arbitrary initial (...)
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  32. added 2016-07-21
    Edward Lorenz (1963). Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow. Journal of Atmospheric Sciences 20 (2):130-148.
    Finite systems of deterministic ordinary nonlinear differential equations may be designed to represent forced dissipative hydrodynamic flow. Solutions of these equations can be identified with trajectories in phase space. For those systems with bounded solutions, it is found that nonperiodic solutions are ordinarily unstable with respect to small modifications, so that slightly differing initial states can evolve into considerably different states. Systems with bounded solutions are shown to possess bounded numerical solutions.A simple system representing cellular convection is solved numerically. All (...)
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  33. added 2016-07-19
    Gabriel Vacariu, Quantum Mechanics: Unbelievable Similarities Between My EDWs and Bill Bill Poirier’s ‘Many Interacting Worlds’ (2016).
    Chapter 12 -/- Quantum mechanics: Unbelievable similarities between my EDWs and Bill Bill Poirier’s ‘Many Interacting Worlds’ (2016) .
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  34. added 2016-07-19
    Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). Understanding Scientific Progress: Aim-Oriented Empiricism. Paragon House.
    "Understanding Scientific Progress constitutes a potentially enormous and revolutionary advancement in philosophy of science. It deserves to be read and studied by everyone with any interest in or connection with physics or the theory of science. Maxwell cites the work of Hume, Kant, J.S. Mill, Ludwig Bolzmann, Pierre Duhem, Einstein, Henri Poincaré, C.S. Peirce, Whitehead, Russell, Carnap, A.J. Ayer, Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, Imre Lakatos, Paul Feyerabend, Nelson Goodman, Bas van Fraassen, and numerous others. He lauds Popper for advancing beyond (...)
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  35. added 2016-07-18
    Valia Allori (forthcoming). Primitive Ontology and the Classical World. In R. Kastner, J. Jeknic-Dugic & G. Jaroszkiewicz (eds.), Quantum Structural Studies: Classical Emergence from the Quantum Level. World Scientific
    In this paper I present the common structure of quantum theories with a primitive ontology, and discuss in what sense the classical world emerges from quantum theories as understood in this framework. In addition, I argue that the primitive ontology approach is better at answering this question than the rival wave function ontology approach or any other approach in which the classical world is nonreductively ‘emergent:’ even if the classical limit within this framework needs to be fully developed, the difficulties (...)
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  36. added 2016-07-18
    Hamid Reza Naeij & Afshin Shafiee (forthcoming). Double-Slit Interference Pattern for a Macroscopic Quantum System. Foundations of Physics:1-15.
    In this study, we solve analytically the Schrödinger equation for a macroscopic quantum oscillator as a central system coupled to two environmental micro-oscillating particles. Then, the double-slit interference patterns are investigated in two limiting cases, considering the limits of uncertainty in the position probability distribution. Moreover, we analyze the interference patterns based on a recent proposal called stochastic electrodynamics with spin. Our results show that when the quantum character of the macro-system is decreased, the diffraction pattern becomes more similar to (...)
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  37. added 2016-07-17
    V. M. Tkachuk (forthcoming). Galilean and Lorentz Transformations in a Space with Generalized Uncertainty Principle. Foundations of Physics:1-14.
    We consider a space with Generalized Uncertainty Principle which can be obtained in the frame of the deformed commutation relations. In the space with GUP we have found transformations relating coordinates and times of moving and rest frames of reference in the first order over the parameter of deformation. In the non-relativistic case we find the deformed Galilean transformation which is rotation in Euclidian space–time. This transformation is similar to the Lorentz one but written for Euclidean space–time where the speed (...)
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  38. added 2016-07-17
    Sebastian De Haro, Daniel R. Mayerson & Jeremy N. Butterfield (forthcoming). Conceptual Aspects of Gauge/Gravity Duality. Foundations of Physics:1-45.
    We give an introductory review of gauge/gravity duality, and associated ideas of holography, emphasising the conceptual aspects. The opening sections gather the ingredients, viz. anti-de Sitter spacetime, conformal field theory and string theory, that we need for presenting, in Sect. 5, the central and original example: Maldacena’s AdS/CFT correspondence. Sections 6 and 7 develop the ideas of this example, also in applications to condensed matter systems, QCD, and hydrodynamics. Sections 8 and 9 discuss the possible extensions of holographic ideas to (...)
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  39. added 2016-07-16
    Maarten Steenhagen (forthcoming). False Reflections. Philosophical Studies:1-16.
    Philosophers and psychologists often assume that mirror reflections are optical illusions. According to many authors, what we see in a mirror appears to be behind it. I discuss two strategies to resist this piece of dogma. As I will show, the conviction that mirror reflections are illusions is rooted in a confused conception of the relations between location, direction, and visibility. This conception is unacceptable to those who take seriously the way in which mirrors contribute to our experience of the (...)
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  40. added 2016-07-15
    Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). Relativity Theory May Not Have the Last Word on the Nature of Time: Quantum Theory and Probabilism. In G. Ghirardi & S. Wuppulur (eds.), Space, Time and the Limits of Human Understanding. Springer
    Two radically different views about time are possible. According to the first, the universe is three dimensional. It has a past and a future, but that does not mean it is spread out in time as it is spread out in the three dimensions of space. This view requires that there is an unambiguous, absolute, cosmic-wide "now" at each instant. According to the second view about time, the universe is four dimensional. It is spread out in both space and time (...)
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  41. added 2016-07-15
    Valia Allori (forthcoming). Space, Time, and (How They) Matter: A Discussion About Some Metaphysical Insights Provided by Our Best Fundamental Physical Theories. In G. C. Ghirardi & J. Statchel (eds.), Space, Time, and Frontiers of Human Understanding. Springer
    This paper is a brief (and hopelessly incomplete) non-standard introduction to the philosophy of space and time. It is an introduction because I plan to give an overview of what I consider some of the main questions about space and time: Is space a substance over and above matter? How many dimensions does it have? Is space-time fundamental or emergent? Does time have a direction? Does time even exist? Nonetheless, this introduction is not standard because I conclude the discussion by (...)
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  42. added 2016-07-15
    Valia Allori (2002). Decoherence and the Classical Limit of Quantum Mechanics. Dissertation, University of Genova, Italy
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  43. added 2016-07-14
    Georgy I. Burde (forthcoming). Special Relativity Kinematics with Anisotropic Propagation of Light and Correspondence Principle. Foundations of Physics:1-25.
    The purpose of the present paper is to develop kinematics of the special relativity with an anisotropy of the one-way speed of light. As distinct from a common approach, when the issue of anisotropy of the light propagation is placed into the context of conventionality of distant simultaneity, it is supposed that an anisotropy of the one-way speed of light is due to a real space anisotropy. In that situation, some assumptions used in developing the standard special relativity kinematics are (...)
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  44. added 2016-07-14
    G. M. Prosperi (forthcoming). Introduction of a Classical Level in Quantum Theory. Foundations of Physics:1-35.
    In an old paper of our group in Milano a formalism was introduced for the continuous monitoring of a system during a certain interval of time in the framework of a somewhat generalized approach to quantum mechanics. The outcome was a distribution of probability on the space of all the possible continuous histories of a set of quantities to be considered as a kind of coarse grained approximation to some ordinary quantum observables commuting or not. In fact the main aim (...)
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  45. added 2016-07-11
    Yu V. Kononets (forthcoming). Novel Principles and the Charge-Symmetric Design of Dirac’s Quantum Mechanics: I. Enhanced Eriksen’s Theorem and the Universal Charge-Index Formalism for Dirac’s Equation in External Static Fields. Foundations of Physics:1-36.
    The presented enhanced version of Eriksen’s theorem defines an universal transform of the Foldy–Wouthuysen type and in any external static electromagnetic field reveals a discrete symmetry of Dirac’s equation, responsible for existence of a highly influential conserved quantum number—the charge index distinguishing two branches of DE spectrum. It launches the charge-index formalism obeying the charge-index conservation law. Via its unique ability to manipulate each spectrum branch independently, the CIF creates a perfect charge-symmetric architecture of Dirac’s quantum mechanics, which resolves all (...)
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  46. added 2016-07-11
    John-Michael Kuczynski (2016). Time Travel. PHILOSOPHYPEDIA.
    It is clearly stated what time-travel would be, were it possible, and it is thereby shown that the very concept of time-travel is incoherent.
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  47. added 2016-07-10
    John-Michael Kuczynski (2016). Aggregative Properties and Emergent Properties. Amazon Digital Services LLC.
    It is said what aggregative properties are and also what emergent properties are, and examples are given each of kind of property. It is also explained why, even though all emergent properties are aggregative properties, not all aggregative properties are emergent properties. It is further made clear that, strictly speaking, emergence is a property of one's knowledge of a given kind of aggregate, and not of such aggregates themselves, this being why a property that is emergent at one time will, (...)
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  48. added 2016-07-09
    Claudio Borghi (forthcoming). Physical Time and Thermal Clocks. Foundations of Physics:1-6.
    In this paper I discuss the concept of time in physics. I consider the thermal time hypothesis and I claim that thermal clocks and atomic clocks measure different physical times, whereby thermal time and relativistic time are not compatible with each other. This hypothesis opens the possibility of a new foundation of the theory of physical time, and new perspectives in theoretical and philosophical researches.
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  49. added 2016-07-07
    Carlo Rovelli (forthcoming). An Argument Against the Realistic Interpretation of the Wave Function. Foundations of Physics:1-9.
    Testable predictions of quantum mechanics are invariant under time reversal. But the evolution of the quantum state in time is not so, neither in the collapse nor in the no-collapse interpretations of the theory. This is a fact that challenges any realistic interpretation of the quantum state. On the other hand, this fact raises no difficulty if we interpret the quantum state as a mere calculation device, bookkeeping past real quantum events.
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  50. added 2016-07-07
    Ray Scott Percival (1998). Nitpicking Newton Review Of: (Pierre Simon Laplace: A Life in Exact Science). [REVIEW] New Scientist (2123).
    ONE of the most celebrated mathematical physicists, Pierre-Simon Laplace is often remembered as the mathematician who showed that despite appearances, the Solar System does conform to Newton’s theories. Together with distinguished scholars Robert Fox and Ivor Grattan-Guinness, Charles Gillispie gives us a new perspective, showing that Laplace did not merely vindicate Newton’s system, but had a uniquely creative and independent mind.
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