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  1. George J. Annas (1975). LAW & PSYCHIATRY: When Must the Doctor Warn Others of the Potential Dangerousness of His Patient's Condition? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 3 (2):2-2.
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  2. Katherine Arens (1996). Wilhelm Griesinger: Psychiatry Between Philosophy and Praxis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):147-163.
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  3. Christopher Bailey (2009). A Painful Lack of Connection. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):249-250.
  4. Christopher Bailey (2009). Clinical Anecdotes: A Painful Lack of Wounds. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):223-224.
  5. Claudio Em Banzato (2009). Deflating Psychiatric Classification. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):23-27.
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  6. Elisabetta Basso (2012). From the Problem of the Nature of Psychosis to the Phenomenological Reform of Psychiatry. Historical and Epistemological Remarks on Ludwig Binswanger’s Psychiatric Project. Medicine Studies 3 (4):215-232.
    This paper focuses on one of the original moments of the development of the “phenomenological” current of psychiatry, namely, the psychopathological research of Ludwig Binswanger. By means of the clinical and conceptual problem of schizophrenia as it was conceived and developed at the beginning of the twentieth century, I will try to outline and analyze Binswanger’s perspective from a both historical and epistemological point of view. Binswanger’s own way means of approaching and conceiving schizophrenia within the scientific, medical, and psychiatric (...)
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  7. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Freud as an 'Evolutionary Psychiatrist' and the Foundations of a Freudian Philosophy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):315-324.
  8. Hannah Bowden (forthcoming). A Phenomenological Study of Anorexia Nervosa. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):227-241.
    In this study, I seek to provide an accurate account of the subjective experience of the body in anorexia nervosa, and how this differs from nonpathological experiences of the body, while remaining neutral on the disorder’s causes. By applying an understanding of the body as found in the work of Merleau-Ponty and Sartre, I show how the insights provided by these philosophers can help to clarify the subjective experience of the disorder. I build up this account of the experience largely (...)
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  9. J. A. Bulcock (2013). Introduction to a Collection of Issues Within Bioethics, Philosophy of Medicine, and Philosophy of Psychiatry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):83-90.
  10. H. Carel (2012). Phenomenology as a Resource for Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):96-113.
    Patient support tools have drawn on a variety of disciplines, including psychotherapy, social psychology, and social care. One discipline that has not so far been used to support patients is philosophy. This paper proposes that a particular philosophical approach, phenomenology, could prove useful for patients, giving them tools to reflect on and expand their understanding of their illness. I present a framework for a resource that could help patients to philosophically examine their illness, its impact on their life, and its (...)
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  11. Lorraine Code (1996). Commentary on "Loopholes, Gaps, and What is Held Fast&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (4):255-260.
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  12. Andreas De Block & Pieter R. Adriaens (2011). Why Philosophers of Psychiatry Should Care About Evolutionary Theory. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press.
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  13. Lloyd Fields (1996). Psychopathy, Other-Regarding Moral Beliefs, and Responsibility. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (4):261-277.
  14. Grant Gillett (2002). The Self as Relatum in Life and Language. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):123-125.
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  15. Thor Grünbaum & Andrea Raballo (2012). Brain Imaging and Psychiatric Classification. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (4):305-309.
    Fielding and Marwede attempt to lay down directions for an applied onto-psychiatry. According to their proposal, such an enterprise requires us to accept certain metaphysical and methodological claims about how brain and experience are related. To put it in one sentence, our critique is that we find their metaphysics questionable and their methodology clinically impracticable.A first fundamental problem for their project, as it is expressed in their paper, is that their overall aim is unclear. At least three different aims might (...)
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  16. Dieneke Hubbeling (2013). Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Philosophical Psychology 26 (6):932 - 936.
  17. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah Decker, Michael First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew Hinderliter, Warren Kinghorn, Steven LoBello, Elliott Martin, Aaron Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph Pierre, Ronald Pies, Harold Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-16.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  18. Nils-Hennes Stear (2009). Sadomasochism as Make-Believe. Hypatia 24 (2):21 - 38.
    In "Rethinking Sadomasochism," Patrick Hopkins challenges the "radical" feminist claim that sadomasochism is incompatible with feminism. He does so by appeal to the notion of "simulation." I argue that Hopkins's conclusions are generally right, but they cannot be inferred from his "simulation" argument. I replace Hopkins's "simulation" with Kendall Walton's more sophisticated theory of "make-believe." I use this theory to better argue that privately conducted sadomasochism is compatible with feminism.
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  19. Thomas Steinbuch (1993). Review: "Take Your Pill Dear": Kate Millett and Psychiatry's Dark Side. [REVIEW] Hypatia 8 (1):197 - 204.
    Kate Millett's book, The Loony-Bin Trip, is an extraordinary account of her personal experience with involuntary psychiatric commitment. The drama of her conflict with professional psychiatry is so tense, so enraging, that one is likely to find oneself having to set the book aside from time to time just to calm down.
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  20. Philip Thomas, Pat Bracken & Sami Timimi (2013). The Limits of Evidence-Based Medicine in Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):295-308.
    It has often been emphasised that psychiatry is still an ‘expertise’ and has not yet reached the status of a science. Science calls for systematic, conceptual thinking which can be communicated to others. Only in so far as psychopathology does this can it claim to be regarded as a science. What in psychiatry is just expertise and art can never be accurately formulated and can at best be mutually sensed by another colleague. It is therefore hardly a matter for textbooks (...)
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  21. Jerome C. Wakefield (2011). Darwin, Functional Explanation, and the Philosophy of Psychiatry. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. 43--172.
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  22. Alison Winter (2013). The Rise and Fall of Forensic Hypnosis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):26-35.
Psychiatric Taxonomy
  1. Sabina Alam, Jigisha Patel & James Giordano (2012). Working Towards a New Psychiatry - Neuroscience, Technology and the DSM-5. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-.
    This Editorial introduces the thematic series on 'Toward a New Psychiatry: Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Classification, Diagnosis and Care' http://www.biomedcentral.com/series/newpsychiatry.
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  2. S. Alexander Weinstock (1965). The Medical Model in Psychopathology. Diogenes 13 (52):14-25.
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  3. Massimiliano Aragona (2009). About and Beyond Comorbidity: Does the Crisis of the DSM Bring on a Radical Rethinking of Descriptive Psychopathology? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):29-33.
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  4. Massimiliano Aragona (2009). The Role of Comorbidity in the Crisis of the Current Psychiatric Classification System. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):1-11.
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  5. Katherine Arens (1996). Commentary on "Lumps and Bumps&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (1):15-16.
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  6. Nomy Arpaly (2005). How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes&Quot;: Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
  7. Alan Baddeley (2007). Working Memory, Thought, and Action. OUP Oxford.
    'Working Memory, Thought, and Action' is the magnum opus of one of the most influential cognitive psychologists of the past 50 years. This new volume on the model he created (with Graham Hitch) discusses the developments that have occurred within the model in the past twenty years, and places it within a broader context. -/- Working memory is a temporary storage system that underpins our capacity for coherent thought. Some 30 years ago, Baddeley and Hitch proposed a way of thinking (...)
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  8. Gillian Bendelow (2004). Sociology and Concepts of Mental Illness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):145-146.
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  9. G. E. Berrios (1996). The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology Since the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Since psychiatry remains a descriptive discipline, it is essential for its practitioners to understand how the language of psychiatry came to be formed. This important book, written by a psychiatrist-historian, traces the genesis of the descriptive categories of psychopathology and examines their interaction with the psychological and philosophical context within which they arose. The author explores particularly the language and ideas that have characterised descriptive psychopathology from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. He presents a masterful survey of the (...)
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  10. Wolfgang Blankenburg (1980). Phenomenology and Psychopathology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 11 (2):50-78.
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  11. Wolfgang Blankenburg & Aaron L. Mishara (2001). First Steps Toward a Psychopathology of "Common Sense&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):303-315.
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  12. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
  13. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Freud as an 'Evolutionary Psychiatrist' and the Foundations of a Freudian Philosophy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):315-324.
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  14. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
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  15. L. Bortolotti (2009). Review: Rachel Cooper: Psychiatry and Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (469):163-166.
  16. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). Psychiatric Classification and Diagnosis. Delusions and Confabulations. Paradigmi (1):99-112.
    In psychiatry some disorders of cognition are distinguished from instances of normal cognitive functioning and from other disorders in virtue of their surface features rather than in virtue of the underlying mechanisms responsible for their occurrence. Aetiological considerations often cannot play a significant classificatory and diagnostic role, because there is no sufficient knowledge or consensus about the causal history of many psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it is not always possible to uniquely identify a pathological behaviour as the symptom of a certain (...)
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  17. Pascal Boyer (2011). Intuitive Expectations and the Detection of Mental Disorder: A Cognitive Background to Folk-Psychiatries. Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):95-118.
  18. Pat Bracken & Philip Thomas (2010). From Szasz to Foucault: On the Role of Critical Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):219-228.
    Because psychiatry deals specifically with ‘mental’ suffering, its efforts are always centrally involved with the meaningful world of human reality. As such, it sits at the interface of a number of discourses: genetics and neuroscience, psychology and sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and the humanities. Each of these provides frameworks, concepts, and examples that seek to assist our attempts to understand mental distress and how it might be helped. However, these discourses work with different assumptions, methodologies, values, and priorities. Some are in (...)
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  19. David H. Brendel (2003). A Pragmatic Consideration of the Relation Between Depression and Melancholia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):53-55.
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  20. Matthew Broome (2007). Taxonomy and Ontology in Psychiatry: A Survey of Recent Literature. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):303-319.
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  21. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (2010). What's Wrong with 'Mental' Disorders? Psychological Medicine.
    Commentary on the editorial by D Stein et al.'s "What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V".
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  22. Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith (2010). Foundations for a Realist Ontology of Mental Disease. Journal of Biomedical Semantics 1 (10):1-23.
    While classifications of mental disorders have existed for over one hundred years, it still remains unspecified what terms such as 'mental disorder', 'disease' and 'illness' might actually denote. While ontologies have been called in aid to address this shortfall since the GALEN project of the early 1990s, most attempts thus far have sought to provide a formal description of the structure of some pre-existing terminology or classification, rather than of the corresponding structures and processes on the side of the patient. (...)
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  23. T. S. Champlin (1989). The Causation of Mental Illness. Philosophical Investigations 12 (1):14-32.
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  24. Louis C. Charland (2010). Medical or Moral Kinds? Moving Beyond a False Dichotomy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):119-125.
    I am delighted that Zachar and Potter have chosen to refer to my work on the DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders in their very interesting and ambitious target article. Their suggestion that we turn to virtue ethics rather than traditional moral theory to understand the relation between moral and nonmoral factors in personality disorders is certainly original and worth pursuing. Yet, in the final instance, I am not entirely sure about the exact scope of their proposed analysis. I also worry (...)
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  25. Louis C. Charland (2004). A Madness for Identity: Psychiatric Labels, Consumer Autonomy, and the Perils of the Internet. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):335-349.
  26. Man Cheung Chung, Bill Fulford & George Graham (eds.) (2006). Reconceiving Schizophrenia. OUP Oxford.
    Schizophrenia arguably is the most troubling, puzzling, and complex mental illness. No single discipline is equipped to understand it. Though schizophrenia has been investigated predominately from psychological, psychiatric and neurobiological perspectives, few attempts have been made to apply the tool kit of philosophy to schizophrenia, the mix of global analysis, conceptual insight, and argumentative clarity that is indicative of a philosophical perspective. This book is a major effort at redressing that imbalance. Recent developments in the area of philosophy known as (...)
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  27. Rachel Cooper (2014). Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Karnac.
    Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Karnac, 2014) evaluates the latest edition of the D.S.M.The publication of D.S.M-5 in 2013 brought many changes. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders asks whether the D.S.M.-5 classifies the right people in the right way. It is aimed at patients, mental health professionals, and academics with an interest in mental health. Issues addressed include: How is the D.S.M. affected by financial links with the pharmaceutical industry? To what extent (...)
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  28. Rachel Cooper (2004). What is Wrong with the DSM? History of Psychiatry 15 (1):5-25.
    The DSM is the main classification of mental disorders used by psychiatrists in the United States and, increasingly, around the world. Although widely used, the DSM has come in for fierce criticism, with many commentators believing it to be conceptually flawed in a variety of ways. This paper assesses some of these philosophical worries. The first half of the paper asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that ‘cuts nature at the joints’ makes sense. What is (...)
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