About this topic
Summary Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology occurs at the intersection of general philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, and ethics. It aims to develop answers to a set of theoretical and practical questions pertaining to the nature of mental disorders, mental health research, and practice.
Key works [BROKEN REFERENCE: RADDAEw]#MURPIT Radden 2004 Graham 2002 Fulford 2006 Poland 2011 Thornton 2007 Sadler 2005 Hacking 1995 Flanagan 1999 Schaffner 1993
Introductions Fulford & Sadler 2009 [BROKEN REFERENCE: NATTNPw]#MARPN
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  1. Building A. Mystery (2006). Alzheimer Disease, MCI and Beyond. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 13 (1):61-74.
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  2. G. Adshead (2001). " Impossible Things Before Breakfast": A Commentary on Burman and Richmond. Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (1):33-38.
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  3. Gwen Adshead (1997). Commentary on" Pathological Autobiographies". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (2):111-113.
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  4. George J. Agich (1994). Key Concepts: Autonomy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (4):267-269.
  5. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1999). Perspectivism and Relativism Beyond the Postmodern Condition. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (3):167-171.
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  6. Gloria Ayob (2013). Getting the Personal Perspective Into View. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):127-130.
    There is a Long-Standing concern that psychiatrists have the task of fitting a square peg into a round hole: the empirical generalizations upon which diagnoses are made have seemed too many to overlook something essential about the individual person who is the subject of the diagnosis. This concern prompted a World Psychiatric Association (WPA) workgroup to suggest that a personalized component should be added to patients’ diagnostic assessment (IDGA Workgroup 2003). One might have the following worry about the WPA workgroup’s (...)
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  7. Y. Michael Barilan (forthcoming). From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):165-181.
    For centuries, it has been held that communication of an ominous prognosis has the power to kill patients and that the cultivation of hope, even when deceitful, may expedite recovery (Faden, Beauchamp, and King 1986, 63). Today, truth is considered a higher value than the pleasantness of no-worry. Research shows that patients want to be told the truth and that informed patients do not die prematurely; rather, they fare better psychologically than those kept behind a veil of silence. We also (...)
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  8. Y. Michael Barilan (forthcoming). Hope and Friendship: Being and Having. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):191-195.
    In its first part, the paper explores the challenge of conceptualizing the Thomist theological virtue of hope in Aristotelian terms that are compatible with non-Thomist and even atheist metaphysics as well. I argue that the key concept in this endeavor is friendship—as an Aristotelian virtue, as relational value in Thomist theology, as a recognized value in supportive care and as a kind of ‘personal hope.’ Then, the paper proceeds to examine the possible differences between hope as a virtue and hope (...)
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  9. Michael Barnett (1973/1975). People, Not Psychiatry. Regnery.
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  10. T. Bayne & E. Pacherie (2004). Monothematic Delusions, Empiricism, and Framework Beliefs. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (1):1.
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  11. Jeffrey Bedrick (2014). Diagnosis and the Individual. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (2):157-159.
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  12. M. Dominic Beer (2000). The Nature, Causes and Types of Ecstasy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):311-315.
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  13. Piers Benn (1999). Matthews's Moral Vision. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (4):317-319.
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  14. Piers Benn (1999). Response to the Commentaries. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):57-58.
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  15. Richard P. Bentall (2011). The Point is to Change Things. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):167-169.
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  16. Ron Berghmans (1998). Commentary on" Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):131-135.
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  17. German E. Berries & Ivana S. Markova (2003). The Self and Psychiatry: A Conceptual History. In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. 9.
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  18. Peter Binns (1995). Commentary on Contentless Consciousness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (1):61-63.
  19. Peter Binns (1994). Affect, Agency, and Engagement: Conceptions of the Person in Philosophy, Neuropsychiatry, and Psychotherapy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (1):13-23.
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  20. Ivy Marie Blackburn (1997). Commentary on" The Stoic Conception of Mental Disorder". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):293-294.
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  21. Charlotte Blease (2010). Scientific Progress and the Prospects for Culture-Bound Syndromes. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):333-339.
    This paper aims to show that the classification by the American Psychiatric Association in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of a distinct listing of disorders known as Culture-Bound Syndromes is misguided. I argue that the list of CBS comprises either genuine disorders that should be included within the main body of the DSM; or ersatz-disorders that serve a practical role for psychiatrists dealing with patients from certain cultures but will one day be eliminated or assimilated by bona (...)
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  22. Margaret A. Boden (1996). Commentary on Towards a Design-Based Analysis of Emotional Episodes. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (2):135-136.
  23. Derek Bolton (2000). Alternatives to Disorder. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (2):141-153.
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  24. Derek Bolton (1997). Encoding of Meaning: Deconstructing the Meaning/Causality Distinction. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):255-267.
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  25. Derek Bolton (1997). Response to the Commentary. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):273-275.
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  26. Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew R. Broome (2007). If You Did Not Care, You Would Not Notice: Recognition and Estrangement in Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (1):39-42.
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  27. Hannah Bowden (forthcoming). "Too Fat" and "Too Thin": Understanding the Bodily Experience of Anorexia Nervosa. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):251-253.
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  28. Hannah Bowden (2013). Is Anorexia Nervosa a Passion? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):367-370.
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  29. G. H. Bower (1990). Awareness, the Unconscious, and Repression: An Experimental Psychologist's Perspective. Repression and the Inaccessibility of Emotional Memories. In Jerome L. Singer (ed.), Repression and Dissociation. University of Chicago Press. 387--403.
  30. Patrick Bracken (1999). The Importance of Heidegger for Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (2):83-85.
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  31. Patrick J. Bracken (1995). Beyond Liberation: Michel Foucault and the Notion of a Critical Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (1):1-13.
  32. Hillel D. Braude (2013). Affecting the Body and Transforming Desire: The Treatment of Suffering as the End of Medicine. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):265-278.
    I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment. I will keep them from harm and injustice. The Hippocratic Oath formulates the ethical principle of medical beneficence and its negative formulation non-maleficence. It relates medical ethics to the traditional end of medicine, that is, to heal, or to make whole. First and foremost, the duty of the physician is to heal, and if this is not possible at least not to harm. This (...)
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  33. S. E. Braude (1998). Commentaries on" False Memory Syndrome". Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 5:299-304.
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  34. Stephen E. Braude (1998). Commentary on" False Memory Syndrome and the Authority of Personal Memory-Claims". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):299-304.
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  35. Stephen E. Braude (1997). Commentary on" A Discursive Account of Multiple Personality Disorder". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (3):223-226.
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  36. Stephen E. Braude (1995). Commentary on" The Social Relocation of Personal Identity". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (3):205-208.
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  37. Margaret Brazier (1995). Commentary on" Who Should Be Committable?". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (1):49-50.
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  38. Adam M. Brenner (2010). Narratives of Shame, Tormenting Ghosts, and the Job of the Therapist. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):259-261.
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  39. Dan W. Brock (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):251-253.
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  40. Jens Brockmeier (1997). Autobiography, Narrative, and the Freudian Concept of Life History. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (3):175-199.
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  41. Jens Brockmeier (1997). Response to the Commentaries. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (3):209-211.
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  42. Jan M. Broekman (2000). Unordered Lives. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (3):223-228.
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  43. Matthew Broome (forthcoming). Reality, Realness, and the Natural Attitude. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):115-118.
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  44. Don Browning (2008). Internists of the Mind or Physicians of the Soul: Does Psychiatry Need a Public Philosophy? Zygon 43 (2):371-383.
    Although psychiatry is interested in what both body and mind contribute to behavior, it sometimes emphasizes one more than the other. Since the early 1980s, American psychiatry has shifted its interest from mind and psyche to body and brain. Neuroscience and psychopharmacology are increasingly at the core of psychiatry. Some experts claim that psychiatry is no longer interested in problems in living and positive goals such as mental health, happiness, and morality but rather has narrowed its focus to mental disorders (...)
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  45. Anna Buchheim, Roberto Viviani & Henrik Walter (2013). Attachment Narratives in Depression A Neurocognitive Approach. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Attachment is the way we relate to others. The way we attach to others is developed early in childhood, can be impaired by early traumatic life events, and is disturbed in many psychiatric disorders. Here we give a short overview about attachment patterns in psychiatric disorders with a focus on depression, and discuss two recent empirical studies of our own that have investigated attachment related brain activation using fMRI. In the first study with patients with borderline personality disorder we used (...)
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  46. Sally Burgess (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):255-258.
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  47. E. Burman (2001). Remembering Feminisms: A Response to the Commentary. Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (1):39-40.
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  48. Erica Burman (2001). Reframing Current Controversies Around Memory: Feminist Contributions. Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (1):21-32.
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  49. John W. Burnside (1998). Commentary on" Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):141-143.
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  50. Giuseppe Butera (2010). Second Harvest: Further Reflections on the Promise of the Thomistic Psychology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (4):377-383.
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