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  1. Gwen Adshead (2003). Measuring Moral Identities: Psychopaths and Responsibility. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):185-187.
  2. Gwen Adshead (1999). Psychopaths and Other-Regarding Beliefs. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):41-44.
  3. Rudolf Allers (1961). Philosophy and Psychiatry. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:78-88.
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  4. Massimiliano Aragona (2012). The Study of Subjective Experience as a Scientific Task for Psychopathology. A Commentary on Stoyanov, D., Machamer, P.K. & Schaffner, K.F. (2012). [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):155-156.
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  5. Meares - Australia (2003). Towards a Psyche for Psychiatry. In Bill Fulford, Katherine Morris, John Z. Sadler & Giovanni Stanghellini (eds.), Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oup Oxford.
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  6. Kent Bach (1993). Emotional Disorder and Attention. In George Graham (ed.), Philosophical Psychopathology. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Some would say that philosophy can contribute more to the occurrence of mental disorder than to the study of it. Thinking too much does have its risks, but so do willful ignorance and selective inattention. Well, what can philosophy contribute? It is not equipped to enumerate the symptoms and varieties of disorder or to identify their diverse causes, much less offer cures (maybe it can do that-personal philosophical therapy is now available in the Netherlands). On the other hand, the scientific (...)
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  7. Konrad Banicki (2012). Connective Conceptual Analysis and Psychology. Theory and Psychology 22 (3):310-323.
    Conceptual analysis, like any exclusively theoretical activity, is far from overrated in current psychology. Such a situation can be related both to the contingent influences of contextual and historical character and to the more essential metatheoretical reasons. After a short discussion of the latter it is argued that even within a strictly empirical psychology there are non-trivial tasks that can be attached to well-defined and methodologically reliable, conceptual work. This kind of method, inspired by the ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Peter (...)
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  8. Paolo Bartolomeo & Gianfranco Dalla Barba (2002). Varieties of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):331-332.
    In agreement with some of the ideas expressed by Perruchet & Vinter (P&V), we believe that some phenomena hitherto attributed to “unconscious” processing may in fact reflect a fundamental distinction between direct and reflexive forms of consciousness. This dichotomy, developed by the phenomenological tradition, is substantiated by examples coming from experimental psychology and lesion neuropsychology.
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  9. Michael Bavidge (2006). Under the Floorboards: Examining the Foundations of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):75-77.
  10. Timothy J. Bayne & Elisabeth Bacherie (2004). Experience, Belief, and the Interpretive Fold. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (1):81-86.
    Elisabeth Pacherie is a research fellow in philosophy at Institut Jean Nicod, Paris. Her main research and publications are in the areas of philosophy of mind, psychopathology and action theory. Her publications include a book on intentionality (_Naturaliser_ _l'intentionnalité_, Paris, PUF, 1993) and she is currently preparing a book on action and agency.
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  11. Sergio Benvenuto (2005). Simplistic Complexity: A Discussion on Psychoanalysis and Chaos Theory. World Futures 61 (3):181 – 187.
    Using a couple of Paul Watzlawick's clinical cases as a starting point, the author shows how prescriptive behavioral strategies do not produce predictable effects: the theory of (nonlinear) complex systems prevents us from establishing a precise connection between a so-called psychotherapeutic act and what we consider therapeutic effects. It is precisely the consideration of the "Lorenz attractors" that thus brings us to reconsider the long psychoanalytic work as the condition for a general structural change of subjectivity: the result of this (...)
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  12. A. V. Bhide (2008). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):274.
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  13. Ajit V. Bhide (2008). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):274.
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  14. R. J. R. Blair (2007). What Emotional Responding is to Blame It Might Not Be to Responsibility. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 149-151.
  15. L. Bortolotti (2009). Review: Rachel Cooper: Psychiatry and Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (469):163-166.
  16. Lisa Bortolotti (2014). The Epistemic Innocence of Motivated Delusions. Consciousness and Cognition.
    Delusions are defined as irrational beliefs that compromise good functioning. However, in the empirical literature, delusions have been found to have some psychological benefits. One proposal is that some delusions defuse negative emotions and protect one from low self-esteem by allowing motivational influences on belief formation. In this paper I focus on delusions that have been construed as playing a defensive function (motivated delusions) and argue that some of their psychological benefits can convert into epistemic ones. Notwithstanding their epistemic costs, (...)
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  17. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). Psychiatric Classification and Diagnosis. Delusions and Confabulations. Paradigmi (1):99-112.
    In psychiatry some disorders of cognition are distinguished from instances of normal cognitive functioning and from other disorders in virtue of their surface features rather than in virtue of the underlying mechanisms responsible for their occurrence. Aetiological considerations often cannot play a significant classificatory and diagnostic role, because there is no sufficient knowledge or consensus about the causal history of many psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it is not always possible to uniquely identify a pathological behaviour as the symptom of a certain (...)
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  18. Lisa Bortolotti, Delusion. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stanford Encyclopedia Entry on Delusions.
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  19. Lisa Bortolotti (2009). Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs. Oxford University Press.
    Delusions are a common symptom of schizophrenia and dementia. Though most English dictionaries define a delusion as a false opinion or belief, there is currently a lively debate about whether delusions are really beliefs and indeed, whether they are even irrational. The book is an interdisciplinary exploration of the nature of delusions. It brings together the psychological literature on the aetiology and the behavioural manifestations of delusions, and the philosophical literature on belief ascription and rationality. The thesis of the book (...)
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  20. Lisa Bortolotti & Rochelle Cox (2009). Faultless Ignorance: Strengths and Limitations of Epistemic Definitions of Confabulation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):952-965.
    There is no satisfactory account for the general phenomenon of confabulation, for the following reasons: (1) confabulation occurs in a number of pathological and non-pathological conditions; (2) impairments giving rise to confabulation are likely to have different neural bases; and (3) there is no unique theory explaining the aetiology of confabulations. An epistemic approach to defining confabulation could solve all of these issues, by focusing on the surface features of the phenomenon. However, existing epistemic accounts are unable to offer sufficient (...)
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  21. Pascal Boyer (2011). Intuitive Expectations and the Detection of Mental Disorder: A Cognitive Background to Folk-Psychiatries. Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):95-118.
    How do people detect mental dysfunction? What is the influence of cultural models of dysfunction on this detection process? The detection process as such is not usually researched as it falls between the domains of cross-cultural psychiatry and anthropological ethno-psychiatry . I provide a general model for this “missing link” between behavior and cultural models, grounded in empirical evidence for intuitive psychology. Normal adult minds entertain specific intuitive expectations about mental function and behavior, and by implication they infer that specific (...)
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  22. Nicola L. Bragazzi (2013). Rethinking Psychiatry with OMICS Science in the Age of Personalized P5 Medicine: Ready for Psychiatome? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):4.
    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is universally acknowledged as the prominent reference textbook for the diagnosis and assessment of psychiatric diseases. However, since the publication of its first version in 1952, controversies have been raised concerning its reliability and validity and the need for other novel clinical tools has emerged. Currently the DSM is in its fourth edition and a new fifth edition is expected for release in 2013, in an intense intellectual debate and in a (...)
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  23. Douglas C. Broadfield (2010). Grandparental Investment and the Epiphenomenon of Menopause in Recent Human History. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):19-20.
    The effects of grandparental investment in relatives are apparent in human groups, suggesting that a postreproductive period in humans is selective. Although investment of relatives in kin produces obvious benefits for kin groups, selection for a postreproductive period in humans is not supported by evidence from chimpanzees. Instead, grandparental investment is likely a recent phenomenon of longevity, rather than an evolved feature.
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  24. Matthew R. Broome (ed.) (2012). The Maudsley Reader in Phenomenological Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press.
    Brings together and interprets previously hard-to-find texts, new translations and passages detailing the interplay between philosophy and psychopathology.
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  25. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (2010). What's Wrong with 'Mental' Disorders? Psychological Medicine.
    Commentary on the editorial by D Stein et al.'s "What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V".
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  26. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (eds.) (2009). Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Neuroscience has long had an impact on the field of psychiatry, and over the last two decades, with the advent of cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging, that influence has been most pronounced. However, many question whether psychopathology can be understood by relying on neuroscience alone, and highlight some of the perceived limits to the way in which neuroscience informs psychiatry. Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience is a philosophical analysis of the role of neuroscience in the study of psychopathology. The book examines (...)
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  27. Havi Carel & Rachel Cooper (2010). Introduction: Culture-Bound Syndromes. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):307-308.
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  28. Anthony W. Clare (1976/1979). Psychiatry in Dissent: Controversial Issues in Thought and Practice. Institute for the Study of Human Issues.
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  29. Joseph T. Clark (1961). Philosophy and Psychiatry. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:172-179.
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  30. Lewis M. Cohen (2004). " Demoralization" and Decisionmaking: Psychiatry Again at the Forefront. Hastings Center Report 34 (6):7.
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  31. Max Coltheart (2013). On the Distinction Between Monothematic and Polythematic Delusions. Mind and Language 28 (1):103-112.
    Some delusional patients exhibit only a single delusional belief (or several delusional beliefs concerning a single theme): this is monothematic delusion. It contrasts with polythematic delusion, where the patient exhibits a variety of delusions concerning a variety of different themes. The neuropsychological bases of various monothematic delusions are rather well understood, and there is a well-worked-out general neuropsychological theory of monothematic delusion, the two-factor theory. Whether polythematic delusion might be explained in a similar way is an open question: I sketch (...)
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  32. Rachel Cooper (unknown). Psychiatry and Philosophy of Science. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    About the Author:Rachel Cooper is lecturer in philosophy at the University of Lancaster.
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  33. George Couvalis & Matthew Usher (2003). Plato on False Pains and Modern Cognitive Science. Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):99-115.
  34. Joe Cruz (1997). Simulation and the Psychology of Sociopathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):525-527.
    Mealey's (1995a) psychological explanation of the sociopath's antisocial activity appeals to an incomplete or nonstandard theory of mind. This is not the only possible mechanism of mental state attribution. The simulation theory of mental state ascription offers a better hope of explaining the diverse elements of sociopathy reported by Mealey.
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  35. R. D. (1956). Psychiatry and Religion. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):375-375.
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  36. Martin Davies (2010). Double Dissociation: Understanding its Role in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Mind and Language 25 (5):500-540.
    The paper makes three points about the role of double dissociation in cognitive neuropsychology. First, arguments from double dissociation to separate modules work by inference to the best, not the only possible, explanation. Second, in the development of computational cognitive neuropsychology, the contribution of connectionist cognitive science has been to broaden the range of potential explanations of double dissociation. As a result, the competition between explanations, and the characteristic features of the assessment of theories against the criteria of probability and (...)
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  37. Richard T. De George (1961). Philosophy and Psychiatry. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:197-204.
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  38. Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza, Jorge Moll, Fátima Azevedo Ignácio & Paul J. Eslingerc (2002). Catatonia: A Window Into the Cerebral Underpinnings of Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):582-584.
    The will is one of the three pillars of the trilogy of mind that has pervaded Western thought for millennia, the other two being affectivity and cognition (Hilgard 1980). In the past century, the concept of will was imperceptibly replaced by the cognitive-oriented behavioral qualifiers “voluntary,” “goal-directed,” “purposive,” and “executive” (Tranel et al. 1994), and has lost much of its heuristic merits, which are related to the notion of “human autonomy” (Lhermitte 1986). We view catatonia as the clinical expression of (...)
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  39. David DeGrazia (1994). Autonomous Action and Autonomy-Subverting Psychiatric Conditions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (3):279-297.
    The following theses are defended in this paper: (1) The concept of autonomous action is centrally relevant to understanding numerous psychiatric conditions, namely, conditions that subvert autonomy; (2) The details of an analysis of autonomous action matter; a vague or rough characterization is less illuminating; (3) A promising analysis for this purpose (and generally) is a version of the "multi-tier model". After opening with five vignettes, I begin the discussion by highlighting strengths and weaknesses of contributions by other authors who (...)
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  40. Andreas Demetriou (2000). From Neural Constructivism to Cognitive Constructivism: The Steps to Be Taken. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):781-782.
    Quartz & Sejnowski's (Q&S's) model for constructive learning agrees with the basic assumptions of mainstream cognitive developmental theories. However, it does not detail the neural equivalents of (1) the process of cognitive change per se, (2) the construction and functioning of thought modules, and (3) the involvement of “mindreading” and “mindsteering” in constructive learning. Specifying these equivalents is necessary if cognitive developmental neuroscience and mainstream cognitive development are to be directly connected.
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  41. den Berg, H. J. & Dreyer Kruger (eds.) (1985). The Changing Reality of Modern Man: Essays in Honour of Jan Hendrik Van Den Berg. Distributed by Humanities Press.
  42. Neelke Doorn (2011). Conceptualization or Assessment: One at a Time or Both? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):153-155.
    I am very grateful to Toby Williamson and Ajit Shah for their insightful commentaries on my paper on mental competence. By linking their commentaries to the Mental Capacity Act of 2005, they both reflect a strong embeddedness in clinical practice, which I very much appreciate. Both authors seem, more or less, to agree on the need for an anthropological conceptualization of mental competence beyond a rather “mechanistic decision-making ability.” However, they do disagree on the pace (Williamson) and direction (Shah) of (...)
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  43. Frank Echenhofer (2012). The Creative Cycle Processes Model of Spontaneous Imagery Narratives Applied to the Ayahuasca Shamanic Journey. Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (1):60-86.
    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychoactive shamanic brew that often elicits spontaneous, intense, and meaningful imagery narratives related to psychological and physical healing, problem solving, knowledge acquisition, community cohesion, creativity, and spiritual development. My EEG and phenomenology ayahuasca research found it caused the greatest changes in EEG beta coherence from 25 to 30 cycles per second compared to a resting state before ayahuasca ingestion. Enhanced beta coherence indexes significantly greater information exchange between cortical regions and is congruent with the reported enhanced (...)
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  44. Leonard J. Eslick (1961). Philosophy and Psychiatry. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:151-163.
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  45. George Hoben Estabrooks (1961). The Future of the Human Mind. New York, Dutton.
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  46. Leo A. Foley (1961). Philosophy and Psychiatry. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:12-13.
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  47. Andrew S. Fox & Richard J. Davidson, Subgenual Prefrontal Cortex Activity Predicts Individual Differences in Hypothalamic-Pituitary- Adrenal Activity Across Different Contexts.
    Background: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system activation is adaptive in response to stress, and HPA dysregulation occurs in stress-related psychopathology. It is important to understand the mechanisms that modulate HPA output, yet few studies have addressed the neural circuitry associated with HPA regulation in primates and humans. Using high-resolution F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in rhesus monkeys, we assessed the relation between individual differences in brain activity and HPA function across multiple contexts that varied in stressfulness.
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  48. Paul Franceschi (2010). A Logical Defence of Maher's Model of Polythematic Delusions. Journal of Philosophical Research 35 (2).
  49. Shepherd Ivory Franz (1906). Psychological Opportunity in Psychiatry. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (21):561-567.
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  50. Thomas Fuchs (2013). Temporality and Psychopathology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):75-104.
    The paper first introduces the concept of implicit and explicit temporality, referring to time as pre-reflectively lived vs. consciously experienced. Implicit time is based on the constitutive synthesis of inner time consciousness on the one hand, and on the conative–affective dynamics of life on the other hand. Explicit time results from an interruption or negation of implicit time and unfolds itself in the dimensions of present, past and future. It is further shown that temporality, embodiment and intersubjectivity are closely connected: (...)
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