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  1. Gloria Ayob (2009). Do People Defy Generalizations?: Examining the Case Against Evidence-Based Medicine in Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):167-174.
  2. Jean-Michel Azorin & Jean Naudin (1997). Commentary on "Edmund Husserl's Influence on Karl Jaspers's Phenomenology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):37-39.
  3. Christopher Bailey (2009). Clinical Anecdotes: A Painful Lack of Wounds. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):223-224.
  4. Konrad Banicki (2012). Connective Conceptual Analysis and Psychology. Theory and Psychology 22 (3):310-323.
    Conceptual analysis, like any exclusively theoretical activity, is far from overrated in current psychology. Such a situation can be related both to the contingent influences of contextual and historical character and to the more essential metatheoretical reasons. After a short discussion of the latter it is argued that even within a strictly empirical psychology there are non-trivial tasks that can be attached to well-defined and methodologically reliable, conceptual work. This kind of method, inspired by the ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Peter (...)
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  5. Else Margrethe Berg (2009). Clinical Practice: Between Explicit and Tacit Knowledge, Between Dialogue and Technique. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):151-157.
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  6. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
  7. Derek Bolton (2009). The Epistemology of Randomized, Controlled Trials and Application in Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):159-165.
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  8. Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome (2012). Affective Dimensions of the Phenomenon of Double Bookkeeping in Delusions. Emotion Review 4 (2):187-191.
    It has been argued that schizophrenic delusions are “behaviourally inert.” This is evidence for the phenomenon of “double bookkeeping,” according to which people are not consistent in their commitment to the content of their delusions. The traditional explanation for the phenomenon is that people do not genuinely believe the content of their delusions. In the article, we resist the traditional explanation and offer an alternative hypothesis: people with delusions often fail to acquire or to maintain the motivation to act on (...)
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  9. Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli (2012). Self-Deception, Delusion and the Boundaries of Folk Psychology. Humana.Mente 20:203-221.
    In this paper we argue that both self-deception and delusions can be understood in folk-psychological terms.
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  10. Pat Bracken & Philip Thomas (2010). From Szasz to Foucault: On the Role of Critical Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):219-228.
    Because psychiatry deals specifically with ‘mental’ suffering, its efforts are always centrally involved with the meaningful world of human reality. As such, it sits at the interface of a number of discourses: genetics and neuroscience, psychology and sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and the humanities. Each of these provides frameworks, concepts, and examples that seek to assist our attempts to understand mental distress and how it might be helped. However, these discourses work with different assumptions, methodologies, values, and priorities. Some are in (...)
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  11. Patrick Bracken (2002). Listening to Foucault. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):187-188.
  12. John Paul Brady & H. Keith H. Brodie (eds.) (1978). Controversy in Psychiatry. Saunders.
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  13. Kelso Cratsley & Richard Samuels (2013). Cognitive Science and Explanations of Psychopathology. In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. 413.
  14. Larry Davidson & Golan Shahar (2007). Introducing a" Deleuze Effect" Into Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):243-247.
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  15. Ronald de Sousa (1972). The Politics of Mental Illness. Inquiry 15 (1-4):187-202.
  16. Naomi Eilan (2001). Meaning, Truth, and the Self: Commentary on Campbell and Parnas and Sass. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2):121-132.
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  17. Carl Elliott (2004). The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  18. Jochen Fahrenberg & Marcus Cheetham (2008). Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):183-201.
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  19. Jochen Fahrenberg & Marcus Cheetham (2008). The Evaluation of Implicit Anthropologies. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):213-214.
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  20. Lloyd Fields (1996). Response to the Commentaries. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (4):291-292.
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  21. Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield (2008). Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):249-269.
  22. Lindsay B. Fletcher & Steven C. Hayes (2009). Phenomenology and Modern Behavioral Psychology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):255-258.
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  23. Bill Fulford, Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome (2014). Taking the Long View: An Emerging Framework for Translational Psychiatric Science. World Psychiatry 13 (2):110-117.
    Understood in their historical context, current debates about psychiatric classification, prompted by the publication of the DSM-5, open up new opportunities for improved translational research in psychiatry. In this paper, we draw lessons for translational research from three time slices of 20th century psychiatry. From the first time slice, 1913 and the publication of Jaspers’ General Psychopathology, the lesson is that translational research in psychiatry requires a pluralistic approach encompassing equally the sciences of mind (including the social sciences) and of (...)
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  24. K. W. M. Fulford & John Z. Sadler (2009). Editors' Introduction. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):221-221.
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  25. Jeffrey L. Geller (2008). Back to the Nineteenth Century Is Progress. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (1):19-21.
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  26. Bernard Gert & Charles M. Culver (2004). The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  27. Richard G. T. Gipps (2009). Pathology of the Mind: Disorder Versus Disability. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):341-344.
  28. Gordon G. Globus (2005). Nonlinear Dynamics at the Cutting Edge of Modernity: A Postmodern View. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):229-234.
  29. George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens (1994). Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press.
  30. Mona Gupta & L. Rex Kay (2002). Phenomenological Methods in Psychiatry: A Necessary First Step. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):93-96.
  31. Ian Hacking (2007). Kinds of People: Moving Targets. Proceedings of the British Academy 151:285-318.
  32. Ian Hacking (1999). The Social Construction of What? Harvard University Press.
    Especially troublesome in this dispute is the status of the natural sciences, and this is where Hacking finds some of his most telling cases, from the conflict ...
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  33. Nick Haslam (2002). Kinds of Kinds: A Conceptual Taxonomy of Psychiatric Categories. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):203-217.
    A pluralistic view of psychiatric classification is defended, according to which psychiatric categories take a variety of structural forms. An ordered taxonomy of these forms—non-kinds, practical kinds, fuzzy kinds, discrete kinds, and natural kinds—is presented and exemplified. It is argued that psychiatric categories cannot all be understood as pragmatically grounded, and at least some reflect naturally occurring discontinuities without thereby representing natural kinds. Even if essentialist accounts of mental disorders are generally mistaken, they are not implied whenever a psychiatric category (...)
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  34. Søren Holm (1998). Hans-Georg Gadamer on Mental Illness €” A Critical Review. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):275-277.
  35. Eranda Jayawickreme & James O. Pawelski (2012). Positivity and the Capabilities Approach. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):383-400.
    We evaluate the suitability of Nussbaum's substantive account of capabilities in light of conceptual and empirical work that has shown that positivity is widely valued and pursued as an end by many people, and evidence that positive outcomes, even economic ones, are often caused by well-being rather than the other way around. While Nussbaum sees positive emotions as incidental to the experience of well-being, we argue that the experience of such mental states is partly constitutive of flourishing.
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  36. Dominic Murphy (2011). Conceptual Foundations of Biological Psychiatry. In Fred Gifford (ed.), Philosophy of Medicine. Elsevier. 16--425.
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  37. Marga Reimer (2012). Davidsonian Holism in Recent Philosophy of Psychiatry. In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Donald Davidson on Truth, Meaning, and the Mental. Oxford University Press.
  38. David Rose, Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri (2014). When Words Speak Louder Than Actions: Delusion, Belief, and the Power of Assertion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy (4):1-18.
    People suffering from severe monothematic delusions, such as Capgras, Fregoli, or Cotard patients, regularly assert extraordinary and unlikely things. For example, some say that their loved ones have been replaced by impostors. A popular view in philosophy and cognitive science is that such monothematic delusions aren't beliefs because they don't guide behaviour and affect in the way that beliefs do. Or, if they are beliefs, they are somehow anomalous, atypical, or marginal beliefs. We present evidence from five studies that folk (...)
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  39. Anastasia P. Scrutton, Is Depression a Sin? A Philosophical Consideration of Christian Voluntarism.
    Among the more notable Christian understandings of depression is the idea that depression is a sin or the result of sin. While this idea is dismissed by many Christians and non-Christians, it is difficult to pinpoint what exactly is wrong with it. This paper seeks to address this problem, focusing on a common premise of the ‘depression is a sin’ claim: that it is within a person’s power to recover, such that remaining depressed is a choice. This claim is held (...)
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  40. Anastasia Philippa Scrutton (forthcoming). Two Christian Theologies of Depression. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology.
    Some recent considerations of religion and psychiatry have drawn a distinction between pathological and spiritual/mystical experiences of mental phenomena typically regarded as within the realm of psychiatry (e.g. depression, hearing voices, seeing visions/hallucinations). Such a distinction has clinical implications, particularly in relation to whether some religious people who suffer from depression, hear voices, or see visions should be biomedically treated. Approaching this question from a theological and philosophical perspective, I draw a distinction between (what I call) ‘spiritual health’ (SH) and (...)
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  41. Marco Solinas (2009). Sulle tracce della malinconia. Un approccio filosofico-sociale. Costruzioni Psicoanalitiche (17):83-102.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  42. Michael Sollberger (2014). Making Sense of an Endorsement Model of Thought‐Insertion. Mind and Language 29 (5):590-612.
    Experiences of thought-insertion are a first-rank, diagnostically central symptom of schizophrenia. Schizophrenic patients who undergo such delusional mental states report being first-personally aware of an occurrent conscious thought which is not theirs, but which belongs to an external cognitive agent. Patients seem to be right about what they are thinking but mistaken about who is doing the thinking. It is notoriously difficult to make sense of such delusions. One general approach to explaining the etiology of monothematic delusions has come to (...)
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  43. Tim Thornton (2007). Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry is a concise introduction to the growing field of philosophy of psychiatry. Divided into three main aspects of psychiatric clinical judgement, values, meanings and facts, it examines the key debates about mental health care, and the philosophical ideas and tools needed to assess those debates, in six chapters. In addition to outlining the state of play, Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry presents a coherent and unified approach across the different debates, characterized by a rejection of reductionism and (...)
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  44. Robert L. Woolfolk (1999). Malfunction and Mental Illness. The Monist 82 (4):658-670.