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  1. Rebecca Aanerud (2007). The Legacy of White Supremacy and the Challenge of White Antiracist Mothering. Hypatia 22 (2):20-38.
  2. Hussein M. Adam, Elizabeth Bell, Robert D. Bullard, Robert Melchior Figueroa, Clarice E. Gaylord, Segun Gbadegesin, R. J. A. Goodland, Howard McCurdy, Charles Mills, Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Peter S. Wenz & Daniel C. Wigley (2001). Faces of Environmental Racism: Confronting Issues of Global Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  3. Jonathan E. Adler (1994). More on Race and Crime: Levin's Reply. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):105-114.
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  4. Jonathan E. Adler (1993). Crime Rates by Race and Causal Relevance: A Reply to Levin. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):176-184.
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  5. Sahar Akhtar (2015). Respecting Embedded Disability. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (1).
    In certain ways, many disabilities seem to occupy a middle ground between illnesses like cancer and identity-traits like race: like illnesses, they can present a wide variety of obstacles in a range of social and natural environments and, insofar as they do, they are something we should prevent potential people from having for their own sake; at the same time, those same types of disabilities can be, like race, a valuable part of the identity of the persons who already have (...)
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  6. Linda Martían Alcoff (2004). Schutte's Nietzschean Postcolonial Politics. Hypatia 19 (3):144-156.
  7. Linda Martín Alcoff (1997). Philosophy and Racial Identity. Philosophy Today 41 (1):67-76.
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  8. Mashuq Ally (2011). Acknowledging the Other: A Multidimensional Analysis of Race and Identity. Philosophia 40 (2).
    I attempt to conceptualize racism through an acknowledgement and evaluation of ethnoracial “difference.” The multidimensionalities of ethnoracial definition and experience as well as of racist expression have prompted the multidisciplinary nature of the analytic work necessary to understand them. Although I focus upon the core issue of individual racism with special reference to moral issues, I also explore ethical and sociopolitical implications of racial identification, and make some suggestions concerning future developments with regard to appreciation and acknowledgement of otherness within (...)
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  9. Jesús Alturo (1998). Escritores Latinos de Catalunya. El Canónigo Ermengol Bernat de la Seu D"Urgell (S.XI)". Humanitas 50:395-418.
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  10. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1996). In My Father's House. Hypatia 11 (1):175-201.
    Judeo-Christian and Anglo-Saxon forms of marriage have injected patrilineal values and companionate expectations into the Akan matrilineal family structure. As Anthony Appiah demonstrates, these infusions have generated severe strains in the matrikin social structures and, in extreme cases, resulted in the break up of families. In this essay, I investigate the ideological politics at play in this patrilinealization of Asante society.
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  11. Susan E. Babbitt (1994). Identity, Knowledge, and Toni Morrison's Beloved: Questions About Understanding Racism. Hypatia 9 (3):1-18.
  12. Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.) (1999). Racism and Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
    By definitively establishing that racism has broad implications for how the entire field of philosophy is practiced -- and by whom -- this powerful and ...
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  13. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on “whiteness” in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  14. Cathryn Bailey (2004). Anna Julia Cooper: "Dedicated in the Name of My Slave Mother to the Education of Colored Working People". Hypatia 19 (2):56-73.
  15. Katharine Lawrence Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women". Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  16. Étienne Balibar (2005). La construction du racisme. Actuel Marx 2 (2):11-28.
    We observe many signs of the fact that the category « racism » not only has profoundly changed its meaning, but could also have reached the limits of its historical validity, both as an instrument of theoretical analysis, and as an instrument of progressive politics. The failed World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and related Intolerance in Durban was a striking indication in this respect. As a consequence, we can no longer proceed in our struggle against extreme discriminations and (...)
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  17. Michael P. Banton (1997). Ethnic and Racial Consciousness. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  18. Debra B. Bergoffen (2004). Engaging Nietzsche's Women: Ofelia Schutte and the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Hypatia 19 (3):157-168.
  19. Robert Bernasconi (ed.) (2001). Race. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume provides an introduction to the concept of race within philosophy. It gives an overview of the most important contributions by continental philosophers to the understanding or race as well as presenting a general review of recent philosophical discussions.
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  20. Homi Bhabha (1997). Editor's Introduction: Minority Maneuvers and Unsettled Negotiations. Critical Inquiry 23 (3):431.
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  21. Chetan Bhatt (1997). Liberation and Purity: Race, New Religious Movements, and the Ethics of Postmodernity. Ucl Press.
    First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  22. Mark Bonta (2009). Taking Deleuze Into the Field: Machinic Ethnography for the Social Sciences Julia Mahler (2008) Lived Temporalities: Exploring Duration in Guatemala. Empirical and Theoretical Studies. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag. Arun Saldanha (2007) Psychedelic White: Goa Trance and the Viscosity of Race. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (1):135-142.
    Julia Mahler Lived Temporalities: Exploring Duration in Guatemala. Empirical and Theoretical Studies. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag.Arun Saldanha Psychedelic White: Goa Trance and the Viscosity of Race. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press.
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  23. Marieke Borren (2013). Feminism as Revolutionary Practice: From Justice and the Politics of Recognition to Freedom. Hypatia 28 (1):197-214.
    In the 1980s extra-parliamentary social movements and critical theories of race, class, and gender added a new sociocultural understanding of justice—recognition—to the much older socioeconomic one. The best-known form of the struggle for recognition is the identity politics of disadvantaged groups. I argue that there is still another option to conceptualize their predicament, neglected in recent political philosophy, which understands exclusion not in terms of injustice, more particularly a lack of sociocultural recognition, but in terms of a lack of freedom. (...)
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  24. Dwight Boyd (2011). Learning to Leave Liberalism…and Live with Complicity, Conundrum and Moral Chagrin. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):329-337.
    This paper is a story of personal learning. I locate its beginning in my early, comfortable adoption of liberalism as the preferred perspective for my work as a philosopher of education. I then trace how and why I became disaffected with this perspective. I describe how learning from students, feminism and critical race theory led to an acceptance of the fact that my particular social locations as a white, upper-middle-class, educated, heterosexual man are not politically neutral as liberalism would have (...)
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  25. Godfrey Brandt & David Muir (1986). Schooling, Morality and Race. Journal of Moral Education 15 (1):58-67.
    Abstract In this paper the authors examine the nature and significance of the interface between race, culture and morality and the implications for the classroom teacher in relation to schooling generally and moral education in particular. They argue that morality is circumscribed by the culture(s) from which it derives and within which it operates. It is therefore, impossible to consider one without the other. The same applies in relation to race and culture and similarly to the holism of race, culture (...)
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  26. W. O. Brown (1933). Rationalization of Race Prejudice. International Journal of Ethics 43 (3):294-306.
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  27. Janet Burke & Ted Humphrey (2011). The New Black Legend of Bartolomé de Las Casas : Race and Personhood. In Jorge J. E. Gracia (ed.), Forging People: Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in Hispanic American and Latino/a Thought. University of Notre Dame Press
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  28. E. Holly Buttner, Kevin B. Lowe & Lenora Billings-Harris (2007). Impact of Leader Racial Attitude on Ratings of Causes and Solutions for an Employee of Color Shortage. Journal of Business Ethics 73 (2):129 - 144.
    Diversity scholars have emphasized the critical role of corporate leaders for ensuring the success of diversity strategic initiatives in organizations. This study reports on business school leaders’ attributions regarding the causes for and solutions to the low representation of U.S. faculty of color in business schools. Results indicatethat leaders with greater awareness of racial issues rated an inhospitable organizational culture as a more important cause and cultural change and recruitment as more important solutions to faculty of color under-representation than did (...)
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  29. Edmund F. Byrne (2010). Commentary on Lawrence Blum's. Social Philosophy Today 19:239-241.
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  30. Courtney M. Cahill, (Still) Not Fit to Be Named: Moving Beyond Race to Explain Why 'Separate' Nomenclature for Gay and Straight Relationships Will Never Be 'Equal'.
    This Article provides a novel approach to an issue that has recently assumed national prominence: Whether it is constitutional to extend same-sex couples the substance of marriage but only under a different name, like civil union or domestic partnership. While legal actors have challenged the constitutionality of nominal difference by comparing it to the discredited legal doctrine of separate-but-equal, this Article moves beyond race to show why 'separate' names for gay and straight relationships will never be 'equal,' namely, because they (...)
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  31. David Cannadine (2013). The Undivided Past: Humanity Beyond Our Differences. Alfred A. Knopf.
    Religion -- Nation -- Class -- Gender -- Race -- Civilization.
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  32. I. Bennett Capers, Policing, Race, and Place.
    Most Americans live in neighborhoods and communities segregated along race lines, and take this segregation for granted. To the extent they view their communities as racially segregated at all, they assume that this segregation is the largely the result of individual choice or socio-economic status, or perhaps a remnant of de jure segregation. The ambition of this Article is to draw attention to a component of segregation that has been largely ignored: the significant role that criminal law and procedure have (...)
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  33. Devon W. Carbado & Cheryl I. Harris, The New Racial Preferences.
    Michigan's Proposal 2 and California's Proposition 209 explicitly prohibit their state governments from discriminating or granting "preferential treatment . . . on the basis of race." Proponents of both ballot initiatives specifically employed this language to eliminate state promulgated race-based affirmative action programs. For advocates of Proposal 2 and Proposition 209, affirmative action is the quintessential example of a preference on the basis on race. They reasoned that the policy benefits blacks and Latinos and burdens whites and, in some formulations, (...)
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  34. Andrew N. Carpenter (2000). Race and the Enlightenment. Teaching Philosophy 23 (3):299-301.
  35. Charles Carr (1980). Making Race a Factor. Journal of Social Philosophy 11 (3):14-16.
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  36. Bob Carter & Steve Fenton (2010). Not Thinking Ethnicity: A Critique of the Ethnicity Paradigm in an Over‐Ethnicised Sociology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (1):1-18.
    The many critical approaches to an ‘ethnicity framework’ have fallen short of a very possible conclusion—that the language of ethnicity provides, for the most part, a poor paradigm with which to work. In the present paper we seek not only to re-state some key weaknesses of this paradigm but also to suggest that these weaknesses are more general in an over-ethnicised sociology. There are numerous critiques of particular models or elements of ethnicity thinking, including critiques of primordialist approaches , of (...)
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  37. Isaac E. Catt (2001). Signs of Disembodiment in Racial Profiling. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):291-318.
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  38. Timothy Caulfield & Simrat Harry (2008). Popular Representations of Race: The News Coverage of BiDil. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (3):485-490.
    The BiDil story offers an ideal opportunity to explore the nature and tone of media representations of race and genetics. For example, was a biological view of race emphasized? Or was the notion of race presented in a critical fashion?
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  39. James P. Chamberlain (1981). Race, IQ and Jensen. Philosophical Studies 28:416-418.
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  40. Tina Chanter (2010). Antigone's Liminality: Hegel's Racial Purification of Tragedy and the Naturalization of Slavery. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan
  41. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning In. Hypatia 21 (3).
    : This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus (...)
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  42. Sushmita Chatterjee (2016). What Does It Mean to Be a Postcolonial Feminist? The Artwork of Mithu Sen. Hypatia 31 (1):22-40.
    This article examines what the work of New Delhi-based artist Mithu Sen brings to thinking about being a postcolonial feminist. Using images from Sen's solo exhibit in New Delhi and New York titled Half Full, I theorize on the complexities that proliferate when thinking about postcolonial feminism. Sen's images play with “an” identity to showcase the hybrid and mobile configuration of postcolonial subjectivity. Sen's provocative aesthetic urges us to rethink defining a set of conditions or tenets for postcolonial feminism. Rather, (...)
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  43. Darren Chetty (2014). The Elephant in the Room: Picturebooks, Philosophy for Children and Racism. Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):11-31.
    Whilst continuing racism is often invoked as evidence of the urgent need for Philosophy for Children, there is little in the current literature that addresses the topic. Drawing on Critical Race Theory and the related field of Critical Whiteness Studies , I argue that racism is deeply ingrained culturally in society, and best understood in the context of ‘Whiteness’. Following a CRT-informed analysis of two picturebooks that have been recommended as starting points for philosophical enquiry into multiculturalism, racism and diversity (...)
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  44. Frances S. Chew (2000). Talking About Race in a Scientific Context. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):485-494.
    There are at least two approaches that assist students in understanding complexity and differing interpretations about human diversity and race. Because differing perspectives emerge from data perceived at different levels, different scales provide a tool for understanding relationships among perspectives and understanding the differential importance of specific factors. Constructivist listening, which assists students in examining their own experiences, feelings and understanding, provides a tool for digesting complex new material and learning emotional literacy. It can be applied to dialogue about race (...)
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  45. Pat K. Chew, Freeing Racial Harassment From the Sexual Harassment Model.
    Judges, academics, and lawyers alike base their legal analyses of workplace racial harassment on the sexual harassment model. Legal principles derived from sexual harassment jurisprudence are presumed to be equally appropriate for racial harassment cases. The implicit assumption is that the social harms and public policy goals of racial harassment and sexual harassment are sufficiently similar to justify analogous scrutiny and remedies. Parties to racial harassment cases cite the reasoning and elements of sexual harassment cases without hesitation, as if racial (...)
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  46. Pat K. Chew & Robert E. Kelley, Unwrapping Racial Harassment Law.
    This article is based on a pioneering empirical study of racial harassment in the workplace in which we statistically analyze federal court opinions from 1976 to 2002. Part I offers an overview of racial harassment law and research, noting its common origin with and its close dependence upon sexual harassment legal jurisprudence. In order to put the study's analysis in context, Part I describes the dispute resolution process from which racial harassment cases arise. Parts II and III present a clear (...)
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  47. Mildred K. Cho (2006). Racial and Ethnic Categories in Biomedical Research: There is No Baby in the Bathwater. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (3):497-499.
    The use of racial categories in biomedicine has had a long history in the United States. However, social hierarchy and discrimination, justified by purported scientific differences, has also plagued the history of racial categories. Because “race” has some correlation with biological and genetic characteristics, there has been a call not to “throw the baby out with the bathwater” by eliminating race as a research or clinical category. I argue that race is too undefined and fluid to be useful as a (...)
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  48. Michael Cholbi (2006). Race, Capital Punishment, and the Cost of Murder. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):255 - 282.
    Numerous studies indicate that racial minorities are both more likely to be executed for murder and that those who murder them are less likely to be executed than if they murder whites. Death penalty opponents have long attempted to use these studies to argue for a moratorium on capital punishment. Whatever the merits of such arguments, they overlook the fact that such discrimination alters the costs of murder; racial discrimination imposes higher costs on minorities for murdering through tougher sentences, and (...)
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  49. George Ciccariello-Maher (2014). Decolonial Realism: Ethics, Politics and Dialectics in Fanon and Dussel. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):2.
    This article approaches contemporary European debates on the subject of realism through the lenses offered by two decolonial thinkers: Fanon and Dussel. Whereas both share with realism a fundamental emphasis on reality as the starting point for theory – an assumption shared by much decolonial thought – they nevertheless provide another layer of specificity in their consideration of the colonial condition, diagnosing a fundamental absence of reciprocity that dictates the course of decolonization as a transformation of reality. Reconsidering the debates (...)
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  50. Natalie Cisneros (2013). “Alien” Sexuality: Race, Maternity, and Citizenship. Hypatia 28 (2):290-306.
    In this paper, I provide an analysis of the emergence of “problematic of alien sexuality.” I first locate discourses about “alien sexuality,” and the so-called anchor baby in particular, within other national discourses surrounding maternity, the fetus, and citizenship. I analyze the ways that national political discourses surrounding “anchor babies” and “alien maternity” construct the “problematic of alien sexuality,” thus constituting the “alien” subject as always-already perverse. I suggest that this production of a sexually deviant and threatening “alien” subject functions (...)
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