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  1. C. P. A. (1957). Philosophy of Religion. Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):169-169.
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  2. C. P. A. (1957). Philosophy of Religion. Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):169-169.
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  3. George L. Abernethy (1968). Philosophy of Religion. New York, Macmillan.
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  4. Scott F. Aikin & Nicholaos Jones (2015). An Atheistic Argument From Ugliness. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (1):209-217.
    The theistic argument from beauty has what we call an 'evil twin', the argument from ugliness. The argument yields either what we call 'atheist win', or, when faced with aesthetic theodicies, 'agnostic tie' with the argument from beauty.
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  5. Moorad Alexanian (2007). Debate About Science and Religion Continues. Physics Today 60 (2).
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  6. Torin Andrew Alter (2011). The God Dialogues: A Philosophical Journey. Oxford University Press.
    The God Dialogues is an intriguing and extensive philosophical debate about the existence of God. Engaging and accessible, it covers all the main arguments for and against God's existence, from traditional philosophical "proofs" to arguments that involve the latest developments in biology and physics.
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  7. Miles Andrews (2014). Divine Hiddenness and Affective Forecasting. Res Cogitans 5 (1):102-110.
    In this paper I argue that J. L. Schellenberg’s Divine Hiddenness Argument is committed to a problematic implication that is weakened by research in cognitive psychology on affective forecasting. Schellenberg’s notion of a nonresistant nonbeliever logically implies that for any such person, it is true that she would form the proper belief in God if provided with what he calls “probabilifying” evidence for God’s existence. In light of Schellenberg’s commitment to the importance of both affective and propositional belief components for (...)
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  8. Louise Antony, William Lane Craig, John Hare, Donald C. Hubin, Paul Kurtz, C. Stephen Layman, Mark C. Murphy, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Richard Swinburne (2009). Is Goodness Without God Good Enough?: A Debate on Faith, Secularism, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Is Goodness Without God Good Enough contains a lively debate between William Lane Craig and Paul Kurtz on the relationship between God and ethics, followed by seven new essays that both comment on the debate and advance the broader discussion of this important issue. Written in an accessible style by eminent scholars, this book will appeal to students and academics alike.
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  9. Thomas Aquinas (1274). Summa Theologica. Hayes Barton Press.
  10. Reid A. Ashbaucher (ed.) (2015). The Christian Faith: A Quick Guide To Understanding Its Inter-Workings. WestBow Press.
    The Christian Faith: A Quick Guide to Understanding Its Inter-Workings is just that: a quick and concise explanation to what the Christian faith is all about and how it all works.
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  11. Corrado Augias (2009). Disputa Su Dio E Dintorni. Mondadori.
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  12. Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast (2009). The Idea Of a Religious Social Science. Alhoda.
    In this book, the words ‘science’ and ‘social science’ are used in their limited sense that refer to experience-based knowledge. This should not indicate that experience is being used in a positivistic sense. Rather, the important insights of all kinds of post-positivist views are embraced to give an extensive meaning to experience. However, the most important characteristic of experience and science that should never be excluded is its dependence on observation and observational evidence. Thus, when ‘science’ is used in combination (...)
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  13. Erik Baldwin & Michael Thune (2008). The Epistemological Limits of Experience-Based Exclusive Religious Belief. Religious Studies 44 (4):445-455.
    Alvin Plantinga and other philosophers have argued that exclusive religious belief can be rationally held in response to certain experiences – independently of inference to other beliefs, evidence, arguments, and the like – and thus can be 'properly basic'. We think that this is possible only until the believer acquires the defeater we develop in this paper, a defeater which arises from an awareness of certain salient features of religious pluralism. We argue that, as a consequence of this defeater, continued (...)
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  14. Robert Bass (2007). Omniscience and the Identification Problem. Florida Philosophical Review 7 (1):78-91.
    I discuss the propositional knowledge of an omniscient being, knowledge of facts that can be represented by that-clauses in sentences such as ‘John knows that the world is round.’ I shall focus upon questions about a supposedly omniscient being who propositionally knows the truth about all current states of affairs. I shall argue that there is no such being.
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  15. Daniele Bertini (2015). Il dibattito sulla Trinità nella filosofia analitica della religione. In Ivan Pozzoni (ed.), Frammenti di filosofia contemporanea. Limina Mentis 111-135.
    An overview of the recent debate on the Trinity in the analytic philosophy of religion. I move from putting forward the Logical Problem of the Trinity (LPT) according to R.Cartwright and M.Rea. I then define two useful notions in order to evaluate the interpretive force of the mainstream approaches to answer LPT; i.e. , be X a concept, I define maximally robust reading of X and sufficiently robust reading of X. In the subsequent section, I offer an expository analysis of (...)
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  16. Daniele Bertini (2014). Una proposta per la caratterizzazione della credenza religiosa. Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia 16.
    My paper challenges the externalist mainstream assumptions towards the understanding of religious beliefs (i.e., reliabilism by W.Alston, the warrant belief approach by A.Plantinga, the neowittgensteinian analysis of doxastic systems). According to such assumptions, religious beliefs should be evaluated rational in terms of the same doxastic standard giving justification for ordinary factual beliefs. Moving from the empiricist intuition that the kind of content of belief matters to the form of belief and the justification practices for it, I argue for the claim (...)
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  17. Raphael Bexten, St. Agnes' Intuition in Spousal Love and in the Nature of Love.
    It is argued in this essay that we can have an »original grasp of the attitude of other persons« (»originales Erfassen«) of persons’ acts, like love hence we know about love not only because of our self-awareness. In this essay I examine two different kinds of spousal love and compare them with each other. For this examination I am using the example of the spousal love of St. Agnes, the bride of Christ.
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  18. Barbara Pfeffer Billauer, Human Reproductive Cloning: Science, Jewish Law and Metaphysics. ssrn.com.
    Abstract: Under traditional Jewish Law (halacha), assessment of human reproductive cloning (HRC) has been formulated along four lines of inquiry, which I discussed in Part I of this paper. Therein I also analyze five relevant doctrines of Talmudic Law, concluding that under with a risk-benefit analysis HRC fails to fulfill the obligation ‘to be fruitful and multiply’ and should be strictly prohibited. Here, I review of the topic from an exigetical Biblical and Kabbalistic perspective, beginning with exploring comments of the (...)
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  19. Miro Brada, Paradox of Religion...
    Religion supposes another world after death: paradise / hell / nirvana / karma... We live in incomplete world, because there is other 'truer' world. This replicates Plato philosophy (428-347 BC): behind something, is something, is something - till the pure idea (final judgement, karma, etc). In contrast, 'I think, therefore I am' (Descartes, 1637), showed the reality independent of Plato's parallel worlds. When I am thinking, regardless of what, 'I am' - whether there is or not 'truer' world. I show (...)
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  20. Andrew Brei (2014). Complementarianism: An Apology of Sorts. Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):55-56.
  21. J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up.
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  22. Andrei Buckareff & Allen Plug (2009). Escapism, Religious Luck, and Divine Reasons for Action. Religious Studies 45 (1):63-72.
    In our paper, ‘Escaping hell: divine motivation and the problem of hell’, we defended a theory of hell that we called ‘escapism’. We argued that given God’s just and loving character it would be most rational for God to maintain an open door policy to those who are in hell, allowing them an unlimited number of chances to be reconciled with God and enjoy communion with God. In this paper we reply to two recent objections to our original paper. The (...)
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  23. Elizabeth Burns (2006). T. J. Mawson: Belief in God: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 42 (4):492-497.
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  24. Elizabeth Burns (2004). T. W. Bartel (Ed): Comparative Theology: Essays for Keith Ward. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 40 (4):511-515.
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  25. Edward Butler (2012). Essays on a Polytheistic Philosophy of Religion. Phaidra Editions.
    These essays lay the groundwork for a practice of philosophical inquiry adequate to polytheistic or "Pagan" religious traditions, including in particular the non-reductive hermeneutics of myth and the theory of the polycentric divine manifold. Includes the previously published articles "The Theological Interpretation of Myth" and "Polycentric Polytheism and the Philosophy of Religion", as well as the previously unpublished essays "Neoplatonism and Polytheism" and "A Theological Exegesis of the Iliad, Book One".
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  26. Gregg Caruso (2014). Science and Religion: 5 Questions. Automatic Press/VIP.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
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  27. Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2014). Review of Exploring Mysticism: A Methodological Essay. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (6):404-5.
    This review works to create a hermeneutic of reading Indian/Hindu texts as treatises on mysticism.
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  28. Kelly James Clark (ed.) (1993). Philosophers Who Believe. Intervarsity Press.
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  29. Stephen Clark (2009). Understanding Faith: Religious Belief and its Place in Society. Imprint Academic.
  30. Stephen R. L. Clark (2005). Berkeley on Religion. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press
  31. Lindsay K. Cleveland & W. Scott Cleveland (2016). The Defeat of Heartbreak: Problems and Solutions for Stump's View of the Problem of Evil Concerning Desires of the Heart. Religious Studies 52 (1):1-23.
    Eleonore Stump insightfully develops Aquinas’s theodicy to account for a significant source of human suffering, namely the undermining of desires of the heart. Stump argues that what justifies God in allowing such suffering are benefits made available to the sufferer through her suffering that can defeat the suffering by contributing to the fulfillment of her heart’s desires. We summarize Stump’s arguments for why such suffering requires defeat and how it is defeated. We identify three problems with Stump’s account of how (...)
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  32. William Lane Craig (ed.) (2002). Philosophy of Religion: A Reader and Guide. Rutgers University Press.
    This book is a combined anthology and guide intended for use as a textbook in courses on philosophy of religion. It aims to bring to the student the very best of cutting-edge work on important topics in the field. (publisher, edited).
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  33. Oliver D. Crisp & Michael C. Rea (eds.) (2009). Analytic Theology: New Essays in the Philosophy of Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy in the English-speaking world is dominated by analytic approaches to its problems and projects; but theology has been dominated by alternative approaches. Many would say that the current state in theology is not mere historical accident, but is, rather, how things ought to be. On the other hand, many others would say precisely the opposite: that theology as a discipline has been beguiled and taken captive by 'continental' approaches, and that the effects on the discipline have been largely deleterious. (...)
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  34. Ingolf U. Dalferth (1988). Theology and Philosophy. Blackwell.
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  35. John Danaher (2014). Necessary Moral Truths and Theistic Metaethics. Sophia 53 (3):309-330.
    Theistic metaethics usually places one key restriction on the explanation of moral facts, namely: every moral fact must ultimately be explained by some fact about God. But the widely held belief that moral truths are necessary truths seems to undermine this claim. If a moral truth is necessary, then it seems like it neither needs nor has an explanation. Or so the objection typically goes. Recently, two proponents of theistic metaethics — William Lane Craig and Mark Murphy — have argued (...)
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  36. Gregory W. Dawes (2012). Evolution and the Bible: The Hermeneutical Question. Relegere 2:37-63.
    Theistic evolutionists often suggest that one can reconcile evolutionary theory with biblical teaching. But in fact Christians have accepted Darwinian theory only after reinterpreting the opening chapters of Genesis. Is such a reinterpretation justified? Within Western Christian thought, there exists a hermeneutical tradition that dates back to St Augustine and which offers guidelines regarding apparent conflicts between biblical teaching and natural philosophy (or “science”). These state that the literal meaning of the text may be abandoned only if the natural-philosophical conclusions (...)
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  37. Gregory W. Dawes (2007). Paradigmatic Explanations: Strauss's Dangerous Idea. Louvain Studies 32 (1-2):67-80.
    David Friedrich Strauss is best known for his mythical interpretation of the Gospel narratives. He opposed both the supernaturalists (who regarded the Gospel stories as reliable) and the rationalists (who offered natural explanations of purportedly supernatural events). His mythical interpretation suggests that many of the stories about Jesus were woven out of pre-existing messianic beliefs and expectations. Picking up this suggestion, I argue that the Gospel writers thought paradigmatically rather than historically. A paradigmatic explanation assimilates the event-to-be- explained to what (...)
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  38. Gregory W. Dawes (2007). What is Wrong with Intelligent Design? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):69 - 81.
    While a great deal of abuse has been directed at intelligent design theory (ID), its starting point is a fact about biological organisms that cries out for explanation, namely "specified complexity" (SC). Advocates of ID deploy three kind of argument from specified complexity to the existence of a designer: an eliminative argument, an inductive argument, and an inference to the best explanation. Only the first of these merits the abuse directed at it; the other two arguments are worthy of respect. (...)
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  39. Gregory W. Dawes (2002). Could There Be Another Galileo Case? Journal of Religion and Society 4.
    In his 1615 letter to the Grand Duchess Christina of Lorraine, Galileo argues for a “principle of limitation”: the authority of Scripture should not be invoked in scientific matters. In doing so, he claims to be following the example of St Augustine. But Augustine’s position would be better described as a “principle of differing purpose”: although the Scriptures were not written in order to reveal scientific truths, such matters may still be covered by biblical authority. The Roman Catholic Church has (...)
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  40. Gregory W. Dawes (1996). Religious Studies and Theology in the University: 'Some Ambiguities' Revisited. Religion 26:49-68.
    What is the relationship between religious studies and theology? Do both have a place within the university? This paper will argue that no clear distinction can be drawn between religious studies and theology on the level of the methods they employ. Each is multidisciplinary and each is able to address questions of religious truth. They can be distinguished only by asking `What is the question which each is attempting to answer?'. Religious studies addresses the question of the meaning and truth (...)
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  41. John de Marneffe (1971). Contemporary Christian Philosophy. Madras,University of Madras.
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  42. Matt DeStefano (2012). Plantinga's Innocent Assumption: Self-Defeating Naturalism, and Churchland's Response. Res Cogitans 3 (1):26-33.
    Alvin Plantinga’s Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism argues that given the story of biological evolution and naturalism, we wouldn’t expect our cognitive mechanisms to be reliable, or that the probability of any given belief being true is very low. Given that our beliefs are generated by our cognitive mechanisms we have a defeater for all of our beliefs which include both evolution and naturalism. Paul Churchland responded by arguing that it is not our native cognitive faculties that justify our beliefs of (...)
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  43. R. Dole (1997). Le concept de Kairos dans la théologie de Paul Tillich et dans le Nouveau Testament grec. Revue D'Histoire Et de Philosophie Religieuses 77 (3):301-307.
    This article proposes a new interpretation of the concept of Kairos in Paul Tillich's theology. It suggests that Tillich gave it exactly the same meaning as that of the Greek New Testament, i.e. the propitious moment in history for the advent of the Son of Man. Tillich's writings offer indications of the metaphysical qualities of this mysterious character.
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  44. Robert Dole (2014). My Meeting with Paul Tillich: "Estranged and Re-United". Toronto Journal of Theology 30 (2):301-306.
    Forty-nine years ago, an eighteen-year-old Harvard undergraduate asked Paul Tillich whether his recent vision was religious ecstasy, a conversion experience, or an enlightenment. The student had handed his essay, "The Phenomenological Proof of God," to Tillich. Two days later the young man was hospitalized as a schizophrenic. Ever since, the author has attempted to understand the relationships between religious revelation, mystical ecstasy and psychosis. If his beatific vision was a hallucination, then should not all similar experiences also be diagnosed as (...)
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  45. Trent Dougherty & Scott Cleveland, The Problem of Evil.
    This is a reference guide to contemporary work on the problem of evil with Oxford Bibliographies Online.
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  46. Einar Duenger Bohn (forthcoming). The Logic of the Trinity. Sophia.
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  47. Eduardo Duque & Cícero Pereira (2015). O Sacerdócio Como Vocação: Motivos de Entrada No Seminário. Theologica 50 (1):63-83.
    English: We analyzed the motivations that Catholic seminarians in Portugal evoke as important factors for their decision to follow the priesthood. We proposed working hypotheses according to which the speech of seminarians could reflect both the influence of classical religious socialization, agents like family and the parish community, as well as more subjective elements related to the idea of a vocation to the priesthood. The results indicated the presence of these factors and showed that the reasons related to the priestly (...)
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  48. R. R. E. (1962). Readings in Religious Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 16 (1):170-171.
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  49. S. A. E. (1962). God, Man, and the Thinker. Review of Metaphysics 16 (2):401-401.
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  50. W. G. E. (1965). Classical and Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Religion. Review of Metaphysics 18 (4):781-781.
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