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Philosophy of Social Science

Edited by Michiru Nagatsu (University of Helsinki)
Assistant editors: Päivi Seppälä, Tarna Kannisto, Alessandra Basso
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  1. added 2016-06-29
    Michael Cholbi & Jaime Ahlberg (forthcoming). Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights Ethical and Philosophical Issues. Routledge.
    Table of Contents -/- Introduction -/- Section I: Procreation and the Sources of Parental Rights and Obligations -/- 1. The Compensatory Basis of Procreative Parental Rights Michael Cholbi -/- 2. Teach Your Children Well Russell DiSilvestro -/- 3. Why Parental Interests Cannot Justify Unlimited Procreation Sarah Hannan -/- Section II: Choosing Our Children -/- 4. Children of Choice and Educational Responsibility Jaime Ahlberg -/- 5. The Problem of Choosing (For) Our Children Lindsey Chambers -/- 6. A Chip off the Old (...)
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  2. added 2016-06-28
    Daniela C. Wilks, José Neves Cruz & Pedro Sousa (forthcoming). Personality Traits and Plagiarism: An Empirical Study with Portuguese Undergraduate Students. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-11.
    Academic dishonesty is a major problem and is thus a highly relevant area of inquiry. Considerable research has shown that key traits from the Big Five model of personality are associated with various forms of anti-social behaviour. To date, however, relatively little research interest has been devoted to study the relationship between personality traits and plagiarism. This study attempts to fill this gap by examining the relationship between the Big Five personality traits and the inclination to commit plagiarism by undergraduate (...)
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  3. added 2016-06-28
    Ernst D. Thoutenhoofd (forthcoming). New Techniques of Difference: On Data as School Pupils. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    Pupils—the learners of both educational thought and of educational practice—exist ever more as data, as do the strictures and goals through which these pupils are pedagogically managed. I elaborate this thought by way of a single example: a particular kind of pupils whose number is reportedly on the increase, namely pupils diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In my analysis I combine Hacking’s nominalist conception of human kinds and Weber’s instrumental rationalism with recent thinking about the effects of digital technologies (...)
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  4. added 2016-06-25
    Simon Lohse (forthcoming). Pragmatism, Ontology, and Philosophy of the Social Sciences in Practice. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116654869.
    In this article, I will discuss two prominent views on the relevance and irrelevance of ontological investigations for the social sciences, namely, ontological foundationalism and anti-ontological pragmatism. I will argue that both views are unsatisfactory. The subsequent part of the article will introduce an alternative role for ontological projects in the philosophy of the social sciences that fares better in this respect by paying attention to the ontological assumptions of actual social scientific theories, models, and related explanatory practices. I will (...)
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  5. added 2016-06-25
    Kevin M. Cahill (forthcoming). The Habitus, Coping Practices, and the Search for the Ground of Action. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116654664.
    The article shows how in Outline of a Theory of Practice Pierre Bourdieu relies on a kind of philosophical myth in his attempt to dispel structuralist accounts of action. Section 2 is a summary of Bourdieu’s use of the concept of habitus against intellectualism and structuralism. Schatzki’s criticism of Bourdieu from a purportedly Wittgensteinian perspective is also examined. Section 3 relates Bourdieu’s use of habitus to a debate between Hubert Dreyfus and John McDowell about the role of concepts in action. (...)
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  6. added 2016-06-24
    Ian Jarvie (forthcoming). Mead and the Trajectory of Anthropology in the United States. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116654860.
    Peter Mandler’s Return from the Natives examines Margaret Mead mid-career when she devoted much energy to promoting anthropology and anthropologists to government and industry and positioned herself as a prominent social commentator. By the time she returned to the field after an interlude of 14 years, something had happened to her professionally: she was treated as a bit of an embarrassment, no longer a scientific heavyweight, and much of this stems from the rather hare-brained “culture cracking” she engaged in during (...)
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  7. added 2016-06-24
    Mark Helmsing (forthcoming). Becoming-American: Experiencing the Nation Through LGBT Fabulation in a Ninth Grade U.S. History Class. Journal of Social Studies Research.
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  8. added 2016-06-24
    V. T. Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko (2016). EVOLUTIONARY RISK OF HIGH HUME TECHNOLOGIES. Article 3. EVOLUTIONARY SEMANTICS AND BIOETHICS. Integrative Annthropology (1):21-27.
    The co-evolutionary concept of three-modal stable evolutionary strategy of Homo sapiens is developed. The concept based on the principle of evolutionary complementarity of anthropogenesis: value of evolutionary risk and evolutionary path of human evolution are defined by descriptive (evolutionary efficiency) and creative-teleological (evolutionary correctness) parameters simultaneously, that cannot be instrumental reduced to other ones. Resulting volume of both parameters define the vectors of biological, social, cultural and techno-rationalistic human evolution by two gear mechanism — genetic and cultural co-evolution and techno-humanitarian (...)
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  9. added 2016-06-24
    V. T. Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko (2015). EVOLUTIONARY RISK OF HIGH HUME TECHNOLOGIES. Article 2. THE GENESIS AND MECHANISMS OF EVOLUTIONARY RISK. Integrative Anthropology (1):4-15.
    Sources of evolutionary risk for stable strategy of adaptive Homo sapiens are an imbalance of: (1) the intra-genomic co-evolution (intragenomic conflicts); (2) the gene-cultural co-evolution; (3) inter-cultural co-evolution; (4) techno-humanitarian balance; (5) inter-technological conflicts (technological traps). At least phenomenologically the components of the evolutionary risk are reversible, but in the aggregate they are in potentio irreversible destructive ones for biosocial, and cultural self-identity of Homo sapiens. When the actual evolution is the subject of a rationalist control and/or manipulation, the magnitude (...)
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  10. added 2016-06-24
    V. T. Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko (2014). EVOLUTIONARY RISK OF HIGH HUME TECHNOLOGIES. Article 1. STABLE ADAPTIVE STRATEGY OF HOMO SAPIENS. Integrative Anthropology (2):4-14.
    Stable adaptive strategy of Homo sapiens (SASH) is a result of the integration in the three-module fractal adaptations based on three independent processes of generation, replication, and the implementation of adaptations — genetic, socio-cultural and symbolic ones. The evolutionary landscape SASH is a topos of several evolutionary multi-dimensional vectors: 1) extraversional projective-activity behavioral intention (adaptive inversion 1), 2) mimesis (socio-cultural inheritance), 3) social (Machiavellian) intelligence, 4) the extension of inter-individual communication beyond their own social groups and their own species in (...)
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  11. added 2016-06-23
    Ken Binmore (forthcoming). Patrick Suppes and Game Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology:1-11.
    This article is a contribution to a symposium celebrating the life of Patrick Suppes. It describes the context in which he made contributions relevant to two extremes of the game theory spectrum. At one extreme, he made an experimental study of whether laboratory subjects learn to use Von Neumann’s minimax theory in games of pure conflict. At the other extreme, he invented a theory of empathetic identification that lies at the root of an approach to making interpersonal comparisons needed for (...)
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  12. added 2016-06-22
    Michael Beaney (2016). Historiography, Philosophy of History and the Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):211-234.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 211 - 234 This article has three main interconnected aims. First, I illustrate the historiographical conceptions of three early analytic philosophers: Frege, Russell and Wittgenstein. Second, I consider some of the historiographical debates that have been generated by the recent historical turn in analytic philosophy, looking at the work of Scott Soames and Hans-Johann Glock, in particular. Third, I discuss Arthur Danto’s _Analytic Philosophy of History_, published 50 years ago, and argue for a (...)
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  13. added 2016-06-22
    D. Timothy Goering (2016). Absolutized Logic is Ideology. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):170-194.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 170 - 194 This essay wishes to probe why in the 1960s and 1970s the German historical discipline did not integrate debates promoted by analytic philosophy into its own debates about theory of history, even though the topics debated by both camps were strikingly similar. I concentrate on the so-called Positivism Dispute, the Ritter School and research group “Poetik und Hermeneutik” and show how some of the writings of analytic philosophers were received and (...)
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  14. added 2016-06-22
    Mark A. Winstanley (2016). Genetic Epistemology, a Universalist Approach to the History of Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):249-278.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 249 - 278 GER Lloyd discerns two conflicting hypotheses concerning human cognition: cross-cultural universality and cultural relativity. The history of science is one discipline among many actively contributing to our understanding of human cognition at present. Not surprisingly, then, the dichotomy is also present in the history of science. In contrast to current approaches to the history of science, which highlight cultural relativity, genetic epistemology, which is conceived by Jean Piaget as a science (...)
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  15. added 2016-06-22
    Doris Gerber (2016). The Concept of Action and the Relevance of Intentional Collective Action in History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):235-247.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 235 - 247 The article starts with the theses that it is the very concept of action that is at stake in many debates between philosophers and historians. Whereas in philosophy actions are conceptualized by reference to their beginning, namely their motives or intentions, in historiography the consequences of actions are much more in the focus of interest. Especially the debate about the dualism of structure and agency is characterized by different concepts of (...)
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  16. added 2016-06-22
    D. Timothy Goering (2016). Introduction to the Forum. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):163-169.
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  17. added 2016-06-22
    James Alexander (2016). The Philosophy of Political History in Oakeshott and Collingwood. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):279-303.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 279 - 303 Every political philosopher has a philosophy of political history, if sometimes not a very good one. Oakeshott and Collingwood are two twentieth century political philosophers who were particularly concerned with the significance of history for political philosophy; and who both, in the 1940s, sketched what I call philosophies of political history: that is, systematic schemes which could make sense of the entire history of political philosophy. In this article I observe (...)
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  18. added 2016-06-22
    Peter Vogt (2016). What Was “Geschichtsphilosophie”? Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):195-210.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 195 - 210 This paper looks at modern philosophy of history in the sense of the German concept of “Geschichtsphilosophie”. “Geschichtsphilosophie”, as it was formulated since the heydays of German Idealism, always implied the belief that it is possible to make true statements about the future. I will take a closer look at such a version of philosophy of history by reconstructing Odo Marquard’s arguments against “Geschichtsphilosophie” and Heinz Dieter Kittsteiner’s defense of it. (...)
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  19. added 2016-06-22
    James Connelly (2016). Italian Triangulations: R.G. Collingwood and His Italian Colleagues. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):305-324.
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  20. added 2016-06-22
    Martin Jay (2016). Experience and History: Phenomenological Perspectives and the Historical World_ _, Written by David Carr. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):325-331.
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  21. added 2016-06-20
    Stefan Schindler (unknown1991). Tao of Teaching. College Teaching 39.
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  22. added 2016-06-19
    Stefan Schindler, A Pedagogy of Bliss.
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  23. added 2016-06-19
    Stefan Schindler, A Pedagogy of Bliss.
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  24. added 2016-06-19
    Kathleen Knight Abowitz (2016). Introduction: Maxine Greene on Democracy and the Social Imagination. Education and Culture 32 (1):1-3.
    In assembling scholars for the John Dewey Symposium for the 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago, I sought thinkers who would critically engage Maxine Greene’s philosophy of democratic education. The recent death of Greene, long-time member of the Society, friend and teacher of many members, and John Dewey Lecturer in 1988, had left a powerful absence among educational philosophers, and many had honored her legacy with loving tributes. The Symposium’s aim was to bring together scholars in critical engagement with her work.Greene (...)
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  25. added 2016-06-19
    Maxine Greene (2016). Liberalism and Beyond: Toward a Public Philosophy of Education. Education and Culture 32 (1):41-51.
    The educational philosophers who wrote in The Social Frontier dealt unabashedly with problems arising out of the social conflicts of their time. Their universe of discourse opened outward to the turbulent domains of politics, economics, and the ideational changes occurring all·around. Fundamental to their concern was the question of liberty in its relation to equality and social control. Rejecting 18th century atomistic notions, persistent dualisms, and the association of liberalism with laissez-faire ideas, they sought a view that “combined equality and (...)
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  26. added 2016-06-19
    P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Christy McConnell Moroye & Bradley Conrad (2016). Aesthetic, Spiritual, And Flow Experiences: Contrasts And Educational Implications. Education and Culture 32 (1):131-151.
    The idea for our paper began with a practical problem. As curricularists dedicated to an aesthetic approach to teaching, curriculum, and learning, we regularly provide workshops on this topic for teachers in K–12 schools. Our own work is based on Dewey’s aesthetic ideas1 and we have developed a theory called CRISPA2 that teachers may employ to create what we might call “wow” experiences in their own classrooms.3 That is, they can set up the conditions for students to have aesthetic experiences (...)
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  27. added 2016-06-19
    Douglas J. Simpson & Donal M. Sacken (2016). Ethical Principles and School Challenges: A Deweyan Analysis. Education and Culture 32 (1):63-86.
    John Dewey is a well-known proponent of certain aspects of progressive education, including the idea that students and teachers should be reflective co-inquirers, not just acquirers of information.1 Among his many other educational ideas are the continuing need to reconstruct school conditions and environments, pedagogical thinking and practice, curricular planning and development, and educational activities and outcomes.2 In the field of education, however, his ideas of ethical inquiry, thinking, and decision-making are not as widely known as his views of teaching (...)
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  28. added 2016-06-19
    Jared Kemling (2016). Richard J. Bernstein and the Pragmatist Turn in Contemporary Philosophy: Rekindling Pragmatism's Fire. Education and Culture 32 (1):163-167.
    As the title of the book indicates, Bernstein’s 2010 work The Pragmatic Turn is the common ground for this collection of twelve essays, with each contributor taking a theme from Bernstein’s volume and using it as a foundation to raise further issues concerning pragmatism after the “pragmatic turn.” Many essays also offer constructive criticism of Bernstein’s thought and positions, often suggesting possible alternatives. In a style reminiscent of the long-running Library of Living Philosophers series, Bernstein provides a short response to (...)
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  29. added 2016-06-19
    Brian W. Dotts (2016). Dewey Anticipates Habermas's Paradigm of Communication: The Critique of Individualism and the Basis for Moral Authority In Democracy and Education. Education and Culture 32 (1):111-129.
    Of unparalleled importance in John Dewey’s democratic philosophy is his focus on the process of change, or the “continuous reconstruction of experience.”1 But how is change to take place and under what circumstances does it best occur? What are the ramifications of Dewey’s theory of change and reconstruction on representative government and political rule? Is change expected to occur pragmatically as a planned process, or is change understood as inchoate phenomena occurring sporadically in Dewey’s philosophy? Who determines change and the (...)
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  30. added 2016-06-19
    Steven Fesmire (2016). Democracy and the Industrial Imagination in American Education. Education and Culture 32 (1):53-61.
    Media fact-checkers promptly corrected Marco Rubio when he called for more vocational education during the November 2015 GOP presidential debate: “Welders make more money than philosophers,” he said. “We need more welders than philosophers.” It was widely pointed out in response to Senator Rubio’s remark that, on average, those who major in philosophy at a college or university tend to have higher salaries than professional welders. But this point, despite its utility for promoting philosophy as an academic major, is a (...)
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  31. added 2016-06-19
    Jon G. Bradley (2016). Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: Essays by John Dewey. Education and Culture 32 (1):153-155.
    Collections demand great care. In any attempt to select, sift, and/or package the literary efforts of a major literary figure, whatever is included will be debated and found wanting. For example, what short stories of Ernest Hemingway or sonnets of William Shakespeare or pithy comments of Winston Churchill would make up a selected collection? The choices and possibilities are numerous, and the possible repercussions mind bending. Arguments are sure to ensue, and even like-minded advocates will fiercely debate the inclusion or (...)
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  32. added 2016-06-19
    Lance E. Mason (2016). Cultivating Civic Habits: A Deweyan Analysis of the National Council for the Social Studies Position Statement on Guidelines for Social Studies Teaching and Learning. Education and Culture 32 (1):87-110.
    The National Council for the Social Studies position statement on “Curriculum Guidelines for Social Studies Teaching and Learning” provides a conceptual outline for contemporary social studies curriculum. The purported goal is to “promote civic competence” in order to “help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.”1 The statement reaffirms the importance of social studies in the wake of No Child Left (...)
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  33. added 2016-06-19
    Eric A. Evans (2016). John Dewey and the Artful Life: Pragmatism, Aesthetics, and Morality. Education and Culture 32 (1):157-162.
    The overriding question Stroud confronts in John Dewey and the Artful Life is how to render more of life’s experiences, including the ensuing benefits, as aesthetic or artful as possible. The answer to this question is challenging and complex. The claim most aesthetic theories make is that an object, activity, or experience is artful if and only if it has intrinsic value. Although what constitutes intrinsic value is widely contested, having value in and of itself is a necessary and sufficient (...)
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  34. added 2016-06-19
    James M. Giarelli (2016). Maxine Greene on Progressive Education: Toward a Public Philosophy of Education. Education and Culture 32 (1):5-14.
    I have been reading and teaching Maxine Greene’s work for many years. I began teaching philosophy and education classes forty years ago as a doctoral student and have used a Maxine Greene text in every one. I’ve used The Public School and the Private Vision, Teacher as Stranger, Landscapes of Learning, Dialectic of Freedom, Releasing the Imagination, Variations on a Blue Guitar, and many other chapters, articles, and essays.1 I’ve had several opportunities to write about her work, her standing within (...)
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  35. added 2016-06-19
    Wendy Kohli (2016). The Dialectical Imagination of Maxine Greene: Social Imagination as Critical Pedagogy. Education and Culture 32 (1):15-24.
    Over 25 years ago, 1988 to be exact, Maxine Greene delivered the annual John Dewey Lecture. That lecture, “The Dialectic of Freedom,” was the foundation for her book of the same title, also published in 1988 by Teachers College Press. In his foreword to the book, the late Bob Gowin, a philosopher of education at Cornell University, introduced the text with the following:Many dialectics are working in this beautifully written book, and no single formulation will capture the whole. It is (...)
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  36. added 2016-06-19
    James Stillwaggon (2016). Two Functions of the Imagination in Greene's Aesthetic Educational Theory. Education and Culture 32 (1):25-39.
    In Art as Experience, Dewey claims that “‘imagination’ shares with ‘beauty’ the doubtful honor of being the chief theme in esthetic writings of enthusiastic ignorance. More perhaps than any other phase of the human contribution, it has been treated as a special and self-contained faculty, differing from others in possession of mysterious potencies.”1 Despite this “doubtful honor,” or as some might claim, because of it, imagination seems to have become a matter of unquestionable value in educational rhetoric over the last (...)
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  37. added 2016-06-18
    Adolfo García de la Sienra (forthcoming). Freedom and Choice in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology:1-17.
    Even though Patrick Suppes made important contributions to utility theory, his final views on economic choice are quite critical of the expected-utility theories of rational choice. The aim of the present paper is to expose in a unified way his final views on economic choice and freedom. These views are part of his conception of causality and rationality.
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  38. added 2016-06-18
    Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (2016). Philosophy Goes to School in Australia: A History 1982-2016. Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):59-83.
    This paper is an attempt to highlight significant developments in the history of philosophy in schools in Australia. We commence by looking at the early years when Laurance Splitter visited the Institute for the Advancement for Philosophy for Children (IAPC). Then we offer an account of the events that led to the formation of what is now the Federation of Australasian Philosophy in Schools Associations (FAPSA), the development and production of a diverse range of curriculum and supporting materials for philosophy (...)
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  39. added 2016-06-18
    Ray Scott Percival (1996). The Metaphysics of Scarcity. The Critical Rationalist 1 (2):1 - 31.
    Natural resources are infinite. This is possible because humans can create theories whose potential goes beyond the limited imaginative capacity of the inventor. For instance, no number of people can work out all the economic potential of quantum theory. Economic Resources are created by an interaction of Karl Popper's Worlds 1, 2 k 3, the worlds of physics, psychology and the abstract products of the human mind, such as scientific theories. Knowledge such as scientific theories has unfathomable information content, is (...)
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  40. added 2016-06-18
    Ray Scott Percival (1996). The Metaphysics of Scarcity. The Critical Rationalist 1 (2):1 - 31.
    Natural resources are infinite. This is possible because humans can create theories whose potential goes beyond the limited imaginative capacity of the inventor. For instance, no number of people can work out all the economic potential of quantum theory. Economic Resources are created by an interaction of Karl Popper's Worlds 1, 2 k 3, the worlds of physics, psychology and the abstract products of the human mind, such as scientific theories. Knowledge such as scientific theories has unfathomable information content, is (...)
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  41. added 2016-06-17
    Mark E. Jonas (2016). Plato's Anti‐Kohlbergian Program for Moral Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):205-217.
    Following Lawrence Kohlberg it has been commonplace to regard Plato's moral theory as ‘intellectualist’, where Plato supposedly believes that becoming virtuous requires nothing other than ‘philosophical knowledge or intuition of the ideal form of the good’. This is a radical misunderstanding of Plato's educational programme, however. While Plato claims that knowledge is extremely important in the initial stages of the moral development of young adults, he also claims that knowledge must be followed by a rigorous process of imitation and habituation. (...)
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  42. added 2016-06-17
    Elisabet Langmann (2016). My Way to You: How to Make Room for Transformative Communication in Intercultural Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):233-245.
    As populations around the globe become increasingly culturally diverse, just inter-personal relations seem dependent on our ability to find new ways of communicating with people from other cultures whose values and linguistic strategies may vary from our own cultural practices. Hence, in the increasing body of literature on intercultural education, intercultural education means helping students to acquire the right language and communication skills for enabling mutual understanding and transformation between cultures. However, several post-colonial scholars have pointed out that there is (...)
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  43. added 2016-06-17
    Mario di Paolantonio (2016). The Cruel Optimism of Education and Education's Implication with ‘Passing‐On’. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):147-159.
    In this article I draw on Lauren Berlant's notion of ‘cruel optimism’ to identify and untangle how the prevailing sense of ‘optimism’ in education works against our common hope or collective striving for what is educational in education. In particular, I discuss how the ‘cruel optimism’ that invites individuals to constantly innovate and improve themselves through ever more learning leads ultimately to a sense of ‘presentism’, ‘privation’ and ‘loneliness’, which comes to threaten the role that education plays in sustaining and (...)
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  44. added 2016-06-17
    Gilberto Scaramuzzo (2016). Aristotle's Homo Mimeticus as an Educational Paradigm for Human Coexistence. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):246-260.
    In the Poetics of Aristotle there is a definition of the human being that perhaps has not yet been well considered in educational theory and practice. This definition calls into question a dynamism that according to Plato was unavoidable for an appropriate understanding of the educational process that turns a human being into a beautiful, good and just citizen: mimesis. The paper's intent is to reconsider the definition of the human being, centred on mimesis, presented by Aristotle in the Poetics (...)
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  45. added 2016-06-17
    Naomi Hodgson & Amanda Fulford (2016). The Hermit and The Poet. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):191-204.
    The notions of literacy and citizenship have become technologised through the demands for measurable learning outcomes and the reduction of these aspects of education to sets of skills and competencies. Technologisation is understood here as the systematisation of an art, rather than as intending to understand technology itself in negative terms or to comment on the way technology is used in teaching and learning for literacy and citizenship. Technologisation is approached here in terms of the understanding of literacy and citizenship (...)
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  46. added 2016-06-17
    Penny Enslin & Kai Horsthemke (2016). Philosophy of Education: Becoming Less Western, More African? Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):177-190.
    Posing the question ‘How diverse is philosophy of education in the West?’ this paper responds to two recent defences of African philosophy of education which endorse its communitarianism and oppose individualism in Western philosophy of education. After outlining Thaddeus Metz's argument that Western philosophy of education should become more African by being more communitarian, and Yusef Waghid's defence of communitarianism in African philosophy of education, we develop a qualified defence of aspects of individualism in education. Our reservations about some aspects (...)
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  47. added 2016-06-17
    Steinar Bøyum (2016). Thomas Piketty and the Justice of Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):135-146.
    Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century is best known for its documentation of increasing social inequality, but it also has a notable normative aspect. Although Piketty is far less clear on the normative level than on the empirical, his view of justice can be summarised as meritocratic luck egalitarianism. This leads him to condemn as unjust the fact that inheritance is once again becoming more important than education for determining social position. In this paper, I discuss whether Piketty's normative (...)
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  48. added 2016-06-17
    Judith Suissa (2016). Testimony, Holocaust Education and Making the Unthinkable Thinkable. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):285-299.
    A great deal of philosophical work has explored the complex conceptual intersection between ethics and epistemology in the context of issues of testimony and belief, and much of this work has significant educational implications. In this paper, I discuss a troubling example of a case of testimony that seems to pose a problem for some established ways of thinking about these issues and that, in turn, suggests some equally troubling educational conclusions.
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  49. added 2016-06-17
    Ben Kotzee (2016). Learning How. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):218-232.
    In this paper, I consider intellectualist and anti-intellectualist approaches to knowledge-how and propose a third solution: a virtue-based account of knowledge-how. I sketch the advantages of a virtue-based account of knowledge-how and consider whether we should prefer a reliabilist or a responsibilist virtue-account of knowledge-how. I argue that only a responsibilist account will maintain the crucial distinction between knowing how to do something and merely being able to do it. Such an account, I hold, must incorporate ‘learning how to do (...)
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  50. added 2016-06-17
    Richard Smith (2016). The Virtues of Unknowing. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):272-284.
    Traditional epistemology is often said to have reached an impasse, and recent interest in virtue epistemology supposedly marks a turn away from philosophers’ traditional focus on problems of knowledge and truth. Yet that focus re-emerges, especially among ‘reliabilist’ virtue epistemologists. I argue for a more ‘responsibilist’ approach and for the importance of some of the quieter and gentler epistemic virtues, by contrast with the tough-minded ones that are currently popular in education. In particular I make a case for what I (...)
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