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Philosophy of Social Science

Edited by Michiru Nagatsu (University of Helsinki)
Assistant editors: Päivi Seppälä, Tarna Kannisto, Alessandra Basso
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  1. added 2016-08-30
    Joris Vlieghe (2016). Schooling Bodies to Read and Write: A Technosomatic Perspective. Educational Theory 66 (4):441-455.
    In this article Joris Vlieghe defends the view that technologies of reading and writing are more than merely instruments that support education, arguing that these technologies themselves decide what education is all about and that they form subjectivity in substantial ways. Expanding on insights taken from media theory, Vlieghe uses the work of Bernard Stiegler in order to develop a “technosomatic” account of literacy initiation, that is, a perspective that zooms in on the physical dimensions of how to operate writing (...)
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  2. added 2016-08-30
    Jon Igelmo Zaldívar (2016). In Defense of the School: A Public Issue. Educational Theory 66 (4):567-573.
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  3. added 2016-08-30
    Anne Mangen (2016). What Hands May Tell Us About Reading and Writing. Educational Theory 66 (4):457-477.
    Reading and writing are increasingly performed with digital, screen-based technologies rather than with analogue technologies such as paper and pen. The current digitization is an occasion to “unpack,” theoretically and conceptually, what is entailed in reading and writing as embodied, multisensory processes involving audiovisual and ergonomic interaction with devices having particular affordances. Highlighting the sensorimotor contingencies of substrates and technologies — how movement and object manipulation affect perception, experience, and sensory “feel” — this article presents an embodied approach to reading, (...)
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  4. added 2016-08-30
    Catherine Adams (2016). Programming the Gesture of Writing: On the Algorithmic Paratexts of the Digital. Educational Theory 66 (4):479-497.
    In the wake of the digital, some have recommended that we abandon the tedium of teaching handwriting to children in service of promoting “more creative” digital literacies. Others worry that an early diet of keyboard and screen may have deleterious effects on children's social, emotional, and cognitive development, as well as their physical well-being. Yet in this debate, the algorithmic scripts and digital surfaces underwriting these new reading, writing, and mathematical practices are, with a few notable exceptions, almost exclusively ignored. (...)
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  5. added 2016-08-30
    Amanda Fulford, Naomi Hodgson, Anna Kouppanou & Joris Vlieghe (2016). Technologies of Reading and Writing: Transformation and Subjectivation in Digital Times. Educational Theory 66 (4):435-440.
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  6. added 2016-08-30
    Naomi Hodgson (2016). Research, Governance, and Technologies of Openness. Educational Theory 66 (4):535-549.
    Recent policy changes in the European Union have introduced the requirement for publicly funded research to be published in open access. This can be seen as part of a mode of democratic accountability that not only promotes transparency but also, Naomi Hodgson argues, is constituted by visibility and openness. By drawing attention to the way in which the researcher is asked to understand herself in this policy context, Hodgson illustrates how particular technologies of performance measurement and management, and of publication, (...)
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  7. added 2016-08-30
    Nicholas C. Burbules (2016). How We Use and Are Used by Social Media in Education. Educational Theory 66 (4):551-565.
    In this article, Nicholas C. Burbules explores the effects of various social media on the ways people communicate, and the implications of these effects for the use of social media in educational contexts. Facebook, Twitter, and a host of other applications are being used in increasing numbers, especially by young people. It is where they live, share, and learn, so it is to be expected that educators would want to find ways to use these technologies to engage them. At the (...)
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  8. added 2016-08-30
    Anna Kouppanou (2016). Texts as Metaphoric Machines and the Challenge of the Digital. Educational Theory 66 (4):499-518.
    In this essay Anna Kouppanou expands the notion of metaphor from its received meaning to refer to an embodied and material process of connectedness that transforms the domains that it brings together. Because of metaphor's reliance on materiality and exteriority Kouppanou turns to literary texts, which she calls “metaphoric machines.” In doing so she sheds light on the specific way texts, as reading/writing technologies, work through metaphorical processes of association. Through the study of print and electronic literary texts Kouppanou shows (...)
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  9. added 2016-08-30
    Amanda Fulford (2016). Learning to Write: Plowing and Hoeing, Labor and Essaying. Educational Theory 66 (4):519-534.
    In this paper Amanda Fulford addresses the issue of student writing in the university, and explores how the increasing dominance of outcome-driven modes of learning and assessment is changing the understanding of what it is to write, what is expected of students in their writing, and how academic writing should best be supported. The starting point is the increasing use of what are termed “technologies” of writing — “handbooks” for students that address issues of academic writing — that systematize, and (...)
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  10. added 2016-08-29
    Juan Espindola (forthcoming). Why Historical Injustice Must Be Taught in Schools. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-12.
    In societies that have failed to confront past injustice, the most common justifications for the inclusion of history education within the school curriculum invoke the idea that those who cannot learn from the past are doomed to repeat it; or they appeal to goals such as reconciliation, or to the importance of recognizing and morally redressing the harm done to victims. These justifications are all sound and important. However, they must be supplemented with a justification of a different kind, one (...)
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  11. added 2016-08-29
    Cédric Paternotte (forthcoming). The Fragility of Common Knowledge. Erkenntnis:1-22.
    Ordinary common knowledge is formally expressed by strong probabilistic common belief. How strong exactly? The question can be answered by drawing from the similar equivalence, recently explored, between plain and probabilistic individual beliefs. I argue that such a move entails that common knowledge displays a double fragility: as a description of a collective state and as a phenomenon, because it can respectively disappear as group size increases, or more worryingly as the epistemic context changes. I argue that despite this latter (...)
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  12. added 2016-08-28
    David Carr (forthcoming). Virtue and Character in Higher Education. British Journal of Educational Studies:1-16.
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  13. added 2016-08-28
    Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, David Wendler & Govind Persad (2015). Clinical Research: Should Patients Pay to Play? Science Translational Medicine 7 (298):298ps16.
    We argue that charging people to participate in research is likely to undermine the fundamental ethical bases of clinical research, especially the principles of social value, scientific validity, and fair subject selection.
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  14. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1994). On 'Capturing Facts Alive in the Past': Response to Fotiadis and Little. American Antiquity 59 (3):556-560.
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  15. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1993). Comments on Analogy in Danish Prehistoric Studies. Norwegian Archaeological Review 26 (2).
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  16. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1992). The 'Illusion of Concreteness' and the Prospects for an Anthropology of Archaeology: Review of Explanation in Archaeology by Guy Gibbon. American Anthropologist 94 (1).
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  17. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1991). Review of Women in Prehistory by Margaret Ehrenberg, and Women in Roman Britain by Lindsay Allason-Jones. Journal of Field Archaeology 18:501-507.
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  18. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1987). Commentary on 'Toward a Critical Archaeology' by Mark P. Leone, Parker B. Potter, and Paul A. Shackel. Current Anthropology 28:247-298.
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  19. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1982). Review of Naturalism and Social Science by David Thomas. International Studies in Philosophy 14:104-106.
  20. added 2016-08-27
    Alison Wylie (1982). An Analogy by Any Other Name is Just as Analogical: A Commentary on the Gould-Watson Dialogue,. Anthropological Archaeology 1:382-401.
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  21. added 2016-08-24
    David Kennedy (forthcoming). Anarchism, Schooling, and Democratic Sensibility. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-18.
    This paper seeks to address the question of schooling for democracy by, first, identifying at least one form of social character, dependent, after Marcuse, on the historical emergence of a “new sensibility.” It then explores one pedagogical thread related to the emergence of this form of subjectivity over the course of the last two centuries in the west, and traces its influence in the educational counter-tradition associated with philosophical anarchism, which is based on principles of dialogue and social reconstruction as (...)
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  22. added 2016-08-24
    Robert A. Wilson (forthcoming). Thinking About Relations: Strathern, Sahlins, and Locke on Anthropological Knowledge. Anthropological Theory.
    John Locke is known within anthropology primarily for his empiricism, his views of natural laws, and his discussion of the state of nature and the social contract. Marilyn Strathern and Marshall Sahlins, however, have offered distinctive, novel, and broad reflections on the nature of anthropological knowledge that appeal explicitly to a lesser-known aspect of Locke’s work: his metaphysical views of relations. This paper examines their distinctive conclusions – Sahlins’ about cultural relativism, Strathern’s about relatives and kinship – both of which (...)
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  23. added 2016-08-24
    Robert A. Wilson (2016). Kinship Past, Kinship Present. American Anthropologist 118 (3).
    In this article, I reconsider bio-essentialism in the study of kinship, centering on David Schneider’s influential critique that concluded that kinship was “a non-subject” (1972:51). Schneider’s critique is often taken to have shown the limitations of and problems with past views of kinship based on biology, genealogy, and reproduction, a critique that subsequently led those reworking kinship as relatedness in the new kinship studies to view their enterprise as divorced from such bio-essentialist studies. Beginning with an alternative narrative connecting kinship (...)
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  24. added 2016-08-20
    Heidi Gauder & Fred W. Jenkins (forthcoming). The Research Skills of Undergraduate Philosophy Majors in Advance. Teaching Philosophy.
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  25. added 2016-08-19
    Lukasz Hardt (2016). Between Isolations and Constructions: Economic Models as Believable Worlds. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 106.
    As the title of this essay suggests, my concern is with the issue of what are economic models. However, the goal of the paper is not to offer an in-depth study on multiple approaches to modelling in economics, but rather to overcome the dichotomical divide between conceptualizing models as isolations and constructions. This is done by introducing the idea of economic models as believable worlds, precisely descriptions of mechanisms that refer to the essentials of the modelled targets. In doing so (...)
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  26. added 2016-08-19
    J. P. Smit, Filip Buekens & Stan du Plessis (2016). Cigarettes, Dollars and Bitcoins – an Essay on the Ontology of Money. Journal of Institutional Economics 12 (2):327 - 347.
    What does being money consist in? We argue that something is money if, and only if, it is typically acquired in order to realise the reduction in transaction costs that accrues in virtue of agents coordinating on acquiring the same thing when deciding what thing to acquire in order to exchange. What kinds of things can be money? We argue against the common view that a variety of things (notes, coins, gold, cigarettes, etc.) can be money. All monetary systems are (...)
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  27. added 2016-08-17
    Michalinos Zembylas (2016). Foucault and Human Rights: Seeking the Renewal of Human Rights Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):384-397.
    This article takes up Foucault's politics of human rights and suggests that it may constitute a point of departure for the renewal of HRE, not only because it rejects the moral superiority of humanism—the grounding for the dominant liberal framework of international human rights—but also because it makes visible the complexities of human rights as illimitable and as strategic tools for new political struggles. Enriching human rights critiques has important implications for HRE, precisely because these critiques prevent the dominance of (...)
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  28. added 2016-08-17
    Patrick R. Frierson (2016). Making Room for Children's Autonomy: Maria Montessori's Case for Seeing Children's Incapacity for Autonomy as an External Failing. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):332-350.
    This article draws on Martha Nussbaum's distinction between basic, internal, and external capacities to better specify possible locations for children's ‘incapacity’ for autonomy. I then examine Maria Montessori's work on what she calls ‘normalization’, which involves a release of children's capacities for autonomy and self-governance made possible by being provided with the right kind of environment. Using Montessori, I argue that, in contrast to many ordinary and philosophical assumptions, children's incapacities for autonomy are best understood as consequences of an absence (...)
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  29. added 2016-08-17
    E. Jayne White (2016). A Philosophy of Seeing: The Work of the Eye/‘I’ in Early Years Educational Practice. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):474-489.
    The work of the eye has a powerful influence across culture and philosophy—not least in Goethe's approach to understanding. Aligned to aesthetic appreciation, seeing has the potential to offer an authorial gift of ‘other-ness’ when brought to bear on evaluative relationships. Yet this penetrating gaze might also be seen as limiting when put to work in the services of ‘other’. From the subtle sideways glance, to the lingering gaze of lovers, a look can mean many things. But the eye does (...)
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  30. added 2016-08-17
    Eric Dayton (2016). On the Spiritual Dimension of Education: Finding a Common Ground. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):432-447.
    Questions about the place of spirituality in publicly funded schools are made difficult in a multicultural secular society. I discuss the work of Paulus Geheeb and Rabindranath Tagore, two great 20th century educational innovators, to offer, by way of an argument from analogy with the social importance of moral education, a common ground for spiritual education.
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  31. added 2016-08-17
    Amanda Fulford (2016). Higher Education, Collaboration and a New Economics. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):371-383.
    In this article I take as my starting point the economist, Jeremy Rifkin's, claims about the rise of what he calls the ‘collaborative commons’. For Rifkin, this is nothing less than the emergence of a new economic paradigm where traditional consumers exploit the possibilities of technology, and position themselves as ‘pro-sumers’. This emphasises their role in production rather than consumption alone, and shows how they aim to bypass a range of capitalist markets, from publishing to the music industry. In asking (...)
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  32. added 2016-08-17
    John White (2016). Moral Education and Education in Altruism: Two Replies to Michael Hand. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):448-460.
    This article is a critical discussion of two recent papers by Michael Hand on moral education. The first is his ‘Towards a Theory of Moral Education’, published in the Journal of Philosophy of Education in 2014. The second is a chapter called ‘Beyond Moral Education?’ in an edited book of new perspectives on my own work in philosophy and history of education, published in the same year. His two papers are linked in that he applies the theory outlined in the (...)
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  33. added 2016-08-17
    Anders Schinkel, Doret J. de Ruyter & Aharon Aviram (2016). Education and Life's Meaning. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):398-418.
    There are deep connections between education and the question of life's meaning, which derive, ultimately, from the fact that, for human beings, how to live—and therefore, how to raise one's children—is not a given but a question. One might see the meaning of life as constitutive of the meaning of education, and answers to the question of life's meaning might be seen as justifying education. Our focus, however, lies on the contributory relation: our primary purpose is to investigate whether and (...)
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  34. added 2016-08-17
    Christopher Martin (2016). Should Students Have to Borrow? Autonomy, Wellbeing and Student Debt. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):351-370.
    The orthodox view on higher education financing is that students should bear some of the costs of attending and, where necessary, meet that cost through debt financing. New economic realties, including protracted economic slowdown and increasing austerity of the state with respect to the public funding of goods and services has meant that the same generation who have to borrow the most in order to attend face significantly fewer employment prospects upon graduation. In this context, is the current approach of (...)
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  35. added 2016-08-17
    Pinhas Luzon (2016). The Eros of Counter Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):461-473.
    Erotic Counter Education is the educational position of the late Ilan Gur- Ze'ev. In ECE Gur-Ze'ev combines two opposing positions in the philosophy of education, one teleological and anti-utopian, the other teleological and utopian. In light of this unique combination, I ask what mediates between these two poles and suggest that the answer lies in the concept of eros. Following a preliminary presentation of the concept of eros in ECE, I define it as a form of transcendental cognition that distinguishes (...)
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  36. added 2016-08-17
    Michael Fordham (2016). Teachers and the Academic Disciplines. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):419-431.
    Alasdair MacIntyre's argument, that teaching is not a social practice, has been extensively criticised, and indeed teaching is normally understood more generally to be a form of generic activity that is a practice in its own right. His associated proposition, that teachers are practitioners of the discipline they teach, has, however, received considerably less attention. MacIntyre himself recognised that for teachers to be understood as being part of the discipline they teach, a broader definition of what is meant by ‘discipline’ (...)
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  37. added 2016-08-15
    Katherine Thomson-Jones (forthcoming). How to Teach Philosophy of Film in Advance. Teaching Philosophy.
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  38. added 2016-08-14
    Dana Delibovi (forthcoming). Four Volumes in the Philosophy of Education in Advance. Teaching Philosophy.
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  39. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2013). Interdisciplinary Practice. In William Rathie, Michael Shanks, Timothy Webmoor & Christopher Witmore (eds.), Archaeology in the Making: Conversations Through a Discipline. Routledge 93-121.
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  40. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2009). What’s Feminist About Gender Archaeology? In Que(e)rying Archaeology: Proceedings of the 36th Annual Chacmool Conference. University of Calgary Archaeology Association 282-289.
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  41. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2007). Introduction: Doing Archaeology as a Feminist. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 14 (3).
  42. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2006). Afterword: On Waves. In Pamela L. Geller & Miranda K. Stockett (eds.), Feminist Anthropology: Past, Present, and Future. University of Pennsylvania Press 167-176.
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  43. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2003). On Ethics. In Larry Zimmerman, Karen D. Vitelli & Julie Hollowell-Zimmer (eds.), Handbook on Ethical Issues in Archaeology. Altamira Press 3-16.
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  44. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2001). Archaeology and Philosophy of Science. In N. J. Smelser & Paul B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Pergamon 614-617.
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  45. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2001). Reflections on the Work of the SAA Committee for Ethics in Archaeology. Canadian Journal of Archaeology 24 (2):151-156.
  46. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2000). Philosophy From the Ground Up: An Interview with Alison Wylie. Assemblages 5.
    Alison Wylie is one of the few full-time academic philosophers of the social and historical sciences on the planet today. And fortunately for us, she happens to specialise in archaeology! After emerging onto the archaeological theory scene in the mid-1980s with her work on analogy, she has continued to work on philosophical questions raised by archaeological practice. In particular, she explores the status of evidence and ideals of objectivity in contemporary archaeology: how do we think we know about the past? (...)
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  47. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2000). Foreword. In Kurt E. Dongoske, Mark Aldenderfer & Karen Doehner (eds.), Working Together: Native Americans and Archaeologists. Society for American Archaeology
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  48. added 2016-08-14
    Roberto Casati, Barry Smith & Achille Varzi (1998). Ontological Tools for Geographic Representation. In Nicola Guarino (ed.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. IOS Press 77-85.
    This paper is concerned with certain ontological issues in the foundations of geographic representation. It sets out what these basic issues are, describes the tools needed to deal with them, and draws some implications for a general theory of spatial representation. Our approach has ramifications in the domains of mereology, topology, and the theory of location, and the question of the interaction of these three domains within a unified spatial representation theory is addressed. In the final part we also consider (...)
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  49. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (1998). Feminism and Social Science. In Edward Craig (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge 588-593.
  50. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (1998). Philosophy of Archaeology. In Edward Craig (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge 354-359.
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