Bookmark and Share

Philosophy of Social Science

Edited by Michiru Nagatsu (University of Helsinki)
Assistant editors: Päivi Seppälä, Tarna Kannisto, Alessandra Basso
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 1725
  1. added 2016-04-30
    Julie Zahle (2014). Introduction. In Julie Zahle & Finn Collin (eds.), Rethinking the Individualism-Holism Debate. Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Springer 1-14.
    The introduction provides an overview of the ontological and the methodological individualism-holism debates. Moreover, these debates are briefly discussed in relation to two kindred disputes: The micro-macro and the agency-structure debates. Finally, the contributions to this book are briefly presented.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. added 2016-04-30
    Julie Zahle (2014). Introduction. In Julie Zahle & Finn Collin (eds.), Rethinking the Individualism-Holism Debate. Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Springer 1-14.
    The introduction provides an overview of the ontological and the methodological individualism-holism debates. Moreover, these debates are briefly discussed in relation to two kindred disputes: The micro-macro and the agency-structure debates. Finally, the contributions to this book are briefly presented.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. added 2016-04-30
    Julie Zahle (2013). Holism, in the Social Sciences. In Byron Kaldis (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Sage Publications 425-430.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. added 2016-04-30
    Julie Zahle (2006). Holism and Supervenience. In Stephen Turner & Mark Risjord (eds.), Handbook of Philosophy of Anthropology and Sociology. Elsevier 311-341.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. added 2016-04-29
    Koustab Ghosh (forthcoming). Virtue in School Leadership: Conceptualization and Scale Development Grounded in Aristotelian and Confucian Typology. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-19.
    Six cardinal leadership virtues based on Aristotelian and Confucian typology were advanced through this study by developing a measurement instrument and examining its predictive validity by studying the causal association with perceived leader happiness. Based on a sample of 183 school principals engaged in various types of schools, the results of both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses generated satisfactory empirical outcomes by finding adequate support for the overall leadership virtue scale and the constituent subscale elements. The paper concluded with the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. added 2016-04-29
    Julie Zahle, Methodological Holism in the Social Sciences. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. added 2016-04-29
    Julie Zahle (2016). Methodological Anti-Naturalism, Norms and Participant Observation. In Mark Risjord (ed.), Normativity and Naturalism in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Routledge 78-95.
    This paper examines the methodological anti-naturalist claim that social scientists make indispensably use of a method that is distinct to the social sciences, when studying norms by way of participant observation. Based on a detailed examination of how social scientists use participant observation to study norms, I argue that, on diverse specifications of “method”, the methodological anti-naturalist contention should be rejected.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. added 2016-04-29
    Julie Zahle (2014). Holism, Emergence and the Crucial Distinction. In Julie Zahle & Finn Collin (eds.), Rethinking the Individualism-Holism Debate. Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Springer 177-196.
    One issue of dispute between methodological individualists and methodological holists is whether holist explanations are dispensable in the sense that individualist explanations are able to do their explanatory job. Methodological individualists say they are, whereas methodological holists deny this. In the first part of the paper, I discuss Elder-Vass’ version of an influential argument in support of methodological holism, the argument from emergence. I argue that methodological individualists should reject it: The argument relies on a distinction between individualist and holist (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. added 2016-04-28
    Dustin Garlitz (2015). Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception, The. In Frederick F. Wherry (ed.), The Sage Encyclopedia of Economics and Society. Sage
  10. added 2016-04-28
    Dustin Garlitz (2014). Mass Media. In Andrew Scull (ed.), Cultural Sociology of Mental Illness: An A-to-Z Guide. Sage
  11. added 2016-04-27
    Manfred Lube (forthcoming). Karl Popper, World 3, and the Arts. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116643717.
    The fine arts are considered as one of several pathways toward insight, knowledge, and understanding. My reflections on this are deliberately not based on aesthetics or on philosophy of art. Speculations on fine art observe two characteristics of specific epistemic processes: first, a tacit knowledge that is not enunciated by ordinary language and, second, a present and effective logic, which has a different pattern from the logic of scientific knowledge. The latter leads to change because it is built upon accumulated (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. added 2016-04-27
    Branko MitroviĆ (forthcoming). Is Multiple Realizability a Valid Argument Against Methodological Individualism? Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116643591.
    In recent decades, a number of authors have relied on the multiple realizability argument to reject methodological individualism. In this article, I argue that this strategy results in serious difficulties and makes it impossible to identify social entities and phenomena.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. added 2016-04-27
    Amos Keestra & Machiel Keestra (2015). A ‘Circulation Model’ of Education: A Response to Challenges of Education at the New University. Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy 2015 (2):90-98.
    The protests at the Universiteit van Amsterdam (UvA) that began in November 2014 as a reaction to severe cuts in the department of humanities have sparked a broad debate nationally and even internationally about the future of the university and the values and ideals that should define it. It turned out that dissatisfaction was much more widespread in different parts of the university than some had previously thought, and many turned out to share the concerns first put forward in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. added 2016-04-26
    Jochen Diekmann, Alfred Gierer, Hans-Jürgen Krupp, Klaus Pinkau, Hans-Joachim Queisser, Fritz Peter Schäfer, Helmut Schaefer, Karl Stephan, Dieter Weiß & Horst Tobias Witt (1991). Sonnenenergie. De Gruyter.
    The book (in German) on “Solar Energy – challenge for research, development and international co-operation” is the report of a study group of the Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin. It reviews solar thermal, photovoltaic, and bio mimetic solar energy techniques; prospects of de-central techniques in developing countries; transport and storage of solar energy; and chances for cooperation with Arabic countries and countries of the South of the former Soviet Union. The prospect of large scale energy production in arid areas, and (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. added 2016-04-25
    Brooke Alan Trisel (2016). Human Extinction, Narrative Ending, and Meaning of Life. Journal of Philosophy of Life 6 (1):1-22.
    Some people think that the inevitability of human extinction renders life meaningless. Joshua Seachris has argued that naturalism can be conceptualized as a meta-narrative and that it narrates across important questions of human life, including what is the meaning of life and how life will end. How a narrative ends is important, Seachris argues. In the absence of God, and with knowledge that human extinction is a certainty, is there any way that humanity could be meaningful and have a good (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. added 2016-04-24
    David Simpson & David Beckett (eds.) (2016). Expertise, Pedagogy and Practice. Routledge.
  17. added 2016-04-24
    María G. Navarro & Kamili Posey (2016). Review of Sandra Harding's Objectivity and Diversity. [REVIEW] Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5 (4):60-64.
    Sandra Harding’s <span class='Hi'>Objectivity</span> and Diversity deals with the epistemic and political limitations of a conception of scientific <span class='Hi'>objectivity</span> that, according to the author, is still in force in our societies. However, in this conception of <span class='Hi'>objectivity</span>, diversity (e.g., of individuals and communities of knowledge, but also, and especially, agendas, models of participation and even styles of reasoning in decision making) still plays a limited and undeserved role.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. added 2016-04-23
    Kurt Stemhagen (2016). Deweyan Democratic Agency and School Math: Beyond Constructivism and Critique. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):95-109.
    In this article, Kurt Stemhagen reconstructs mathematics education in light of Dewey's democratic theory and his ideas about mathematics and mathematics education. The resulting democratic philosophy and pedagogy of mathematics education emphasizes agency and the connections between mathematics and students' social experiences. Stemhagen considers questions about the disconnect between constructivist reformers and critical mathematics educators, and he positions Dewey's ideas as a way to draw on the best of both to create an active and more democratic school math experience.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. added 2016-04-23
    Sarah M. Stitzlein & Amy Rector‐Aranda (2016). The Role of “Small Publics” in Teacher Dissent. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):165-180.
    In this essay, Sarah Stitzlein and Amy Rector-Aranda, drawing on John Dewey's theoretical suggestions regarding how to best form publics capable of bringing about change through deliberation and action, offer teachers guidance on how to form and navigate spaces of political protest and become more effective advocates for school reform. Using Aaron Schutz's analysis of teacher activism as a point of departure, Stitzlein and Rector-Aranda argue for the development in schools of “small publics,” that is, Deweyan democratic spaces within which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. added 2016-04-23
    Scott L. Pratt (2016). Geography, History, and the Aims of Education: The Possibility of Multiculturalism in Democracy and Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):199-210.
    In this essay, Scott Pratt develops the tension at work in Democracy and Education between conceptions of multiculturalism that emerge from Dewey's commitment to progress as a process of civilization and from his contrasting commitment to a vision of progress as a localized process that requires respect for boundaries and limits. The first is related to what Patrick Wolfe has called “settler colonialism.” The second conception of multiculturalism, framed by the aims of education and the conception of growth, avoids the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. added 2016-04-23
    Leonard J. Waks (2016). Democracy and Education at 100. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):7-13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. added 2016-04-23
    Terri S. Wilson & David I. Waddington (2016). Introduction to Section II: Dewey's Living Ideas. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):89-94.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. added 2016-04-23
    David L. Hildebrand (2016). The Paramount Importance of Experience and Situations in Dewey's Democracy and Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):73-88.
    In this essay, David Hildebrand connects Democracy and Education to Dewey's wider corpus. Hildebrand argues that Democracy and Education's central objective is to offer a practical and philosophical answer to the question, What is needed to live a meaningful life, and how can education contribute? He argues, further, that this work is still plausible as “summing up” Dewey's overall philosophy due to its focus upon “experience” and “situation,” crucial concepts connecting Dewey's philosophical ideas to one another, to education, and to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. added 2016-04-23
    Doris A. Santoro (2016). “We're Not Going to Do That Because It's Not Right”: Using Pedagogical Responsibility to Reframe the Doublespeak of Fidelity. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):263-277.
    In this essay, Doris Santoro examines the discourse of “fidelity of instruction” to show how it is doublespeak for teacher compliance that is incompatible with democracy and education. Analyzing the distorted use of the term “fidelity” by market-based reformers, Santoro illustrates how it can be used as a weapon against teacher intelligence and moral response. She argues that John Dewey's philosophy provides conceptual resources to reframe some teacher infidelity as intelligent response, the moral agency required for pedagogical responsibility.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. added 2016-04-23
    Barbara S. Stengel (2016). Educating Homo Oeconomicus? “The Disadvantages of a Commercial Spirit” for the Realization of Democracy and Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):245-261.
    At present, the structures, practice, and discourse of schooling are anchored to a “commercial spirit” that understands students, educators, and parents as economic operators trading competitively in human capital and to a discourse of failure that is disabling those who seek to understand and enact John Dewey's notion of education as democratic practice. Here Barbara Stengel illustrates both the commercial spirit in public schools and the discourse of school failure across two geopolitical settings: Shanghai, China, and urban U.S. schools. She (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. added 2016-04-23
    Barbara S. Stengel (2016). Introduction to Section III: Deweyan Growth in Practice. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):227-230.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. added 2016-04-23
    Larry A. Hickman (2016). Introduction to Section I: Contexts of Democracy and Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):15-20.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. added 2016-04-23
    Peter J. Nelsen (2016). Growth and Resistance: How Deweyan Pragmatism Reconstructs Social Justice Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):231-244.
    While Democracy and Education is often cited within the scholarship on and teaching of social justice education, it and Dewey's work generally remain underutilized. Peter Nelsen argues in this essay that Deweyan pragmatism offers rich resources for social justice education by exploring how Dewey's three-part conception of growth has both analytical and normative force. Nelsen makes this case by examining student resistance to engagement with social justice issues, and concludes from this analysis that resistance is an opportunity for growth. Furthermore, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. added 2016-04-23
    David E. Meens (2016). Democratic Education Versus Smithian Efficiency: Prospects for a Deweyan Ideal in the “Neoliberal Age”. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):211-226.
    In this essay, David Meens examines the viability of John Dewey's democratic educational project, as presented in Democracy and Education, under present economic and political conditions. He begins by considering Democracy and Education's central themes in historical context, arguing that Dewey's proposal for democratic education grew out of his recognition of a conflict between how political institutions had traditionally been understood and organized on the one hand, and, on the other, emerging requirements for personal and social development in the increasingly (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. added 2016-04-23
    James Campbell (2016). Democracy and Education: Reconstruction of and Through Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):39-53.
    While focusing on Democracy and Education, James Campbell attempts in this essay to offer a synthesis of the full range of John Dewey's educational thought. Campbell explores in particular Dewey's understanding of the relationship between democracy and education by considering both his ideas on the reconstruction of education and on the role of education in broader social reconstruction. Throughout his philosophical work, Campbell concludes, Dewey offers us a vision of a society self-consciously striving to enable its members to live fully (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. added 2016-04-23
    Kathleen Knight Abowitz (2016). Imagining Democratic Futures for Public Universities: Educational Leadership Against Fatalism's Temptations. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):181-197.
    At current rates, almost all U.S. public universities could reach a point of zero state subsidy within the next fifty years. What is a public university without public funding? In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz considers the future of public universities, drawing upon the analysis provided in John Dewey's Democracy and Education. Knight Abowitz conducts an initial institutional analysis through two broad prisms: that of the political landscape that authorizes universities as public institutions, and that of the present political–economic context (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. added 2016-04-23
    Amy Voss Farris & Pratim Sengupta (2016). Democratizing Children's Computation: Learning Computational Science as Aesthetic Experience. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):279-296.
    In this essay, Amy Voss Farris and Pratim Sengupta argue that a democratic approach to children's computing education in a science class must focus on the aesthetics of children's experience. In Democracy and Education, Dewey links “democracy” with a distinctive understanding of “experience.” For Dewey, the value of educational experiences lies in “the unity or integrity of experience.” In Art as Experience, Dewey presents aesthetic experience as the fundamental form of human experience that undergirds all other forms of experiences (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. added 2016-04-23
    Maura Striano (2016). The Travels of Democracy and Education: A Cross‐Cultural Reception History. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):21-37.
    After its publication in 1916, Democracy and Education opened up a global debate about educational thought that is still ongoing. Various translations of Dewey's work, appearing at different times, have aided in introducing his ideas within different conversations and across different cultures. The introduction of Dewey's masterwork through academic, institutional, or political avenues has influenced its reception within contemporary educational scenarios; these avenues need to be taken into account when analyzing the book's reception as well as its impact on the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. added 2016-04-23
    Emil Višňovský & Štefan Zolcer (2016). Dewey's Participatory Educational Democracy. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):55-71.
    In this essay, Emil Višňovský and Štefan Zolcer outline John Dewey's contribution to democratic theory as presented in his 1916 classic Democracy and Education. The authors begin with a review of the general context of Dewey's conception of democracy, and then focus on particular democratic ideas and concepts as presented in Democracy and Education. This analysis emphasizes not so much the technical elaboration of these ideas and concepts as their philosophical framework and the meanings of democracy for education and education (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. added 2016-04-23
    Terri S. Wilson (2016). Interest, Not Preference: Dewey and Reframing the Conceptual Vocabulary of School Choice. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):147-163.
    School choice positions parents as consumers who select schools that maximize their preferences. This account has been shaped by rational choice theory. In this essay, Terri Wilson contrasts a rational choice framework of preferences with John Dewey's understanding of interest. To illustrate this contrast, she draws on an example of one parent's school decision-making process. Dewey's concept of interest offers an alternative conceptual vocabulary attentive to the complex, value-laden, and evolving process of choosing a school. Her analysis considers how schools (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. added 2016-04-23
    Harry C. Boyte & Margaret J. Finders (2016). “A Liberation of Powers”: Agency and Education for Democracy. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):127-145.
    In this essay Harry Boyte and Margaret Finders argue that addressing the “shrinkage” of education and democracy requires acting politically to reclaim and augment Deweyan agency-focused concepts of democracy and education. Looking at agency from the vantage of civic studies, which advances a politics of agency — a citizen politics that is different from ideological politics — and citizens as cocreators of political communities, Boyte and Finders explore the technocratic trends that have eclipsed agency. These disempower educators, students, and communities. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. added 2016-04-23
    David I. Waddington & Noah Weeth Feinstein (2016). Beyond the Search for Truth: Dewey's Humble and Humanistic Vision of Science Education. Educational Theory 66 (1-2):111-126.
    In this essay, David Waddington and Noah Weeth Feinstein explore how Dewey's conception of science can help us rethink the way science is done in schools. The authors begin by contrasting a view of science that is implicitly accepted by many scientists and science educators — science as a search for truth — with Dewey's instrumentalist, technological, and nonrealist conception of science. After demonstrating that the search-for-truth conception is closely linked to some ongoing difficulties with science curricula that students find (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. added 2016-04-22
    Miloš Taliga (forthcoming). Why the Objectivist Interpretation of Falsification Matters. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116643486.
    The article distinguishes between subjectivist and objectivist interpretations of scientific method, links subjectivism with good reasons, and argues its uselessness for our understanding of science. It applies the distinction to the method of falsification, explains why objectivism regards falsification to be conjectural, immune to the Duhem–Quine thesis, and immune to the problem of underdetermination. It confronts the falsifying mode of inference with the fallacy of begging the question and with the paradox of inference, and suggests how modus tollens helps scientists (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. added 2016-04-22
    Francesco Di Iorio (forthcoming). World 3 and Methodological Individualism in Popper’s Thought. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116642992.
    Popper’s theory of World 3 is often regarded as incongruent with his defense of methodological individualism. This article criticizes this widespread view. Methodological individualism is said to be at odds with three crucial assumptions of the theory of World 3: the impossibility of reducing World 3 to subjective mental states because it exists objectively, the view that the mental functions cannot be explained by assuming that individuals are isolated atoms, and the idea that World 3 has causal power and influences (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. added 2016-04-21
    Jonny Anomaly (2016). Review of Brennan and Jaworski, Markets Without Limits. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:00.
  41. added 2016-04-20
    Marc-Kevin Daoust (ed.) (2016). Capitalisme, propriété et solidarité. Les Cahiers d'Ithaque.
    Le but de ce recueil est d’offrir des commentaires accessibles et introductifs aux textes classiques qu’ils accompagnent, en ouvrant des perspectives de discussion sur le thème du capitalisme. C’est en ce sens qu’Emmanuel Chaput lance le débat en commentant le texte de Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, « Qu’est-ce que la propriété ? ». Les textes de Karl Marx ne sont bien sûr pas laissés pour compte : Samuel-Élie Lesage s’engage fermement dans cette voie en discutant L’idéologie allemande de Karl Marx, Christiane Bailey (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. added 2016-04-19
    Simon Deakin, David Gindis, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Kainan Huang & Katharina Pistor (forthcoming). Legal Institutionalism: Capitalism and the Constitutive Role of Law. Journal of Comparative Economics.
    Social scientists have paid insufficient attention to the role of law in constituting the economic institutions of capitalism. Part of this neglect emanates from inadequate conceptions of the nature of law itself. Spontaneous conceptions of law and property rights that downplay the role of the state are criticized here, because they typically assume relatively small numbers of agents and underplay the complexity and uncertainty in developed capitalist systems. In developed capitalist economies, law is sustained through interaction between private agents, courts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. added 2016-04-19
    Simon Deakin, David Gindis, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Kainan Huang & Katharina Pistor (forthcoming). Legal Institutionalism: Capitalism and the Constitutive Role of Law. Journal of Comparative Economics.
    Social scientists have paid insufficient attention to the role of law in constituting the economic institutions of capitalism. Part of this neglect emanates from inadequate conceptions of the nature of law itself. Spontaneous conceptions of law and property rights that downplay the role of the state are criticized here, because they typically assume relatively small numbers of agents and underplay the complexity and uncertainty in developed capitalist systems. In developed capitalist economies, law is sustained through interaction between private agents, courts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. added 2016-04-18
    Dave Elder-Vass (2015). Of Babies and Bathwater. A Review of Tuukka Kaidesoja Naturalizing Critical Realist Social Ontology. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (2):327–331.
    Tuukka Kaidesoja’s new book is a welcome addition to the literature on critical realism. He shows good judgement in defending Roy Bhaskar’s argument for causal powers while criticising its framing as a transcendental argument. In criticising Bhaskar’s concept of a real-but-not-actual ontological domain, however, he discards an essential element of a realist ontology, even a naturalised one: a recognition of the transfactual aspect of causal power.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. added 2016-04-18
    Tuukka Kaidesoja (2015). Précis of Naturalizing Critical Realist Social Ontology. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (2):321–326.
    This paper introduces and contextualizes my book Naturalizing Critical Realist Social Ontology (London: Routledge, 2013).
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. added 2016-04-18
    Sveinung Sundfør Sivertsen (2015). No Need for Infinite Iteration. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (2):301–319.
    As part of his argument for a “Copernican revolution” in social ontology, Hans Bernhard Schmid (2005) argues that the individualistic approach to social ontology is critically flawed. This article rebuts his claim that the notion of mutual belief necessarily entails infinite iteration of beliefs about the intentions of others, and argues that collective action can arise from individual contributions without such iteration. What matters is whether or when there are grounds for belief, and while extant groups and social structures may (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. added 2016-04-17
    Alfred Gierer (1981). Socioeconomic Inequalities: Effects of Self-Enhancement, Depletion and Redistribution. Jahrbücher für Nationalökonomie Und Statistik 196 (4):309-331.
    Socioeconomic inequalities are functions not only of intrinsic differences between persons or groups, but also of the dynamics of their interactions. Inequalities can arise and become stabilized if there are advantages (such as generalized wealth including “human capital”) which are self-enhancing, whereas depletion of limiting resources is widely distributed. A recent theory of biological pattern formation has been generalized, adapted and applied to deal with this process. Applications include models for the non-Gaussian distribution of personal income and wealth, for overall (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. added 2016-04-16
    Nathaniel T. Wilcox (forthcoming). Robert A. Millikan Meets the Credibility Revolution. Journal of Economic Methodology.
  49. added 2016-04-15
    Dave Elder-Vass (2015). Collective Intentionality and Causal Powers. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (2):251–269.
    Bridging two traditions of social ontology, this paper examines the possibility that the concept of collective intentionality can help to explain the mechanisms underpinning the causal powers of some social entities. In particular, I argue that a minimal form of collective intentionality is part of the mechanism underpinning the causal power of norm circles: the social entities causally responsible for social norms. There are, however, many different forms of social entity with causal power, and the relationship of collective intentionality to (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. added 2016-04-15
    Robert Sugden (2015). Team Reasoning and Intentional Cooperation for Mutual Benefit. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (1):143–166.
    This paper proposes a concept of intentional cooperation for mutual benefit. This concept uses a form of team reasoning in which team members aim to achieve common interests, rather than maximising a common utility function, and in which team reasoners can coordinate their behaviour by following pre-existing practices. I argue that a market transaction can express intentions for mutually beneficial cooperation even if, extensionally, participation in the transaction promotes each party’s self-interest.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1725