Bookmark and Share

Philosophy of Social Science

Edited by Michiru Nagatsu (University of Helsinki, Tallinn University of Technology)
Assistant editors: Alessandra Basso, Tarna Kannisto, Päivi Seppälä
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. added 2014-10-25
    Yair Levy (2014). Money Pumps, Diachronic and Synchronic. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy:XX.
    The Money Pump argument is designed to demonstrate the irrational flaw of having cyclic preferences, by showing how the irrational agent is vulnerable to exploitation. The argument faces some longstanding objections, which point out how one may avoid the threat of exploitation without resolving the associated irrationality. Recently a new, synchronic version of Money Pump has been put forward which promises to undercut those standard objections. However, I argue that the synchronic Money Pump cannot deliver on its promise: parallel objections (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. added 2014-10-23
    Serge Grigoriev (2014). PHILOSOPHY IN TRANSITION: JOHN DEWEY's “LOST” MANUSCRIPT. History and Theory 53 (3):372-386.
    The intention of this essay is to offer a reading of John Dewey’s recently found manuscript (considered lost for decades), Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy, as a kind of philosophical history leading up to the formulation of the key problems to be addressed by the general framework of Dewey’s cultural naturalism. I argue, first, that cultural naturalism has direct implications for the way that we think about history, and that Dewey’s recently recovered manuscript reflects this in its conception of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. added 2014-10-22
    Michael R. Matthews (ed.) (2014). International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer.
    This inaugural handbook documents the distinctive research field that utilizes history and philosophy in investigation of theoretical, curricular and pedagogical issues in the teaching of science and mathematics. It is contributed to by 130 researchers from 30 countries; it provides a logically structured, fully referenced guide to the ways in which science and mathematics education is, informed by the history and philosophy of these disciplines, as well as by the philosophy of education more generally. The first handbook to cover the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. added 2014-10-16
    David Ellerman (2014). On a Fallacy in the Kaldor-Hicks Efficiency-Equity Analysis. Constitutional Political Economy 25 (2):125-136.
    This paper shows that implicit assumptions about the numeraire good in the Kaldor-Hicks efficiency-equity analysis involve a "same-yardstick" fallacy (a fallacy pointed out by Paul Samuelson in another context). These results have negative implications for cost-benefit analysis, the wealth-maximization approach to law and economics, and other parts of applied welfare economics--as well as for the whole vision of economics based on the "production and distribution of social wealth.".
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. added 2014-10-14
    Michael Morreau (2014). Arrow's Theorem. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: N/A.
    Kenneth Arrow’s “impossibility” theorem—or “general possibility” theorem, as he called it—answers a very basic question in the theory of collective decision-making. Say there are some alternatives to choose among. They could be policies, public projects, candidates in an election, distributions of income and labour requirements among the members of a society, or just about anything else. There are some people whose preferences will inform this choice, and the question is: which procedures are there for deriving, from what is known or (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. added 2014-10-08
    Horacio Tignanelli & Yann Benétreau-Dupin (2014). Perspectives of History and Philosophy on Teaching Astronomy. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 603-640.
    The didactics of astronomy is a relatively young field with respect to that of other sciences. Historical issues have most often been part of the teaching of astronomy, although that often does not stem from a specific didactics. The teaching of astronomy is often subsumed under that of physics. One can easily consider that, from an educational standpoint, astronomy requires the same mathematical or physical strategies. This approach may be adequate in many cases but cannot stand as a general principle (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. added 2014-10-06
    Yann Benétreau-Dupin & Guillaume Beaulac (forthcoming). Fair Numbers: What Data Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy. Ergo.
    The low representation of women in philosophy (<30%) in English-speaking countries has generated much discussion, both in academic circles and the public sphere. It is sometimes suggested (Haslanger, 2009) that unconscious biases, acting at every level in the field, may be grounded in gendered schemas of philosophers and the discipline more widely and that actions to make philosophy a more welcoming place for women should address such schemas. However, existing data are too limited to fully warrant such an explanation, which (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. added 2014-09-30
    J. Paul Kelleher (forthcoming). Is There A Sacrifice-Free Solution to Climate Change? Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    John Broome claims that there is a sacrifice-free solution to climate change. He says this is a consequence of elementary economics. After explaining the economic argument in somewhat more detail than Broome, I show that the argument is unsound. A main problem with it stems from Derek Parfit’s “nonidentity effect.” But there is hope, since the nonidentity effect underwrites a more philosophical yet more plausible route to a sacrifice-free solution. So in the end I join Broome in asking economists and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. added 2014-09-26
    J. Paul Kelleher, Efficiency and Equity in Health: Philosophical Considerations. Encyclopedia of Health Economics Vol. 1.
    Efficiency and equity are central concepts for the normative assessment of health policy. Drawing on the work of academic philosophers and philosophically sophisticated economists, this article identifies important philosophical questions implicated by the notions of efficiency and equity and then summarizes influential answers to them. Promising avenues for further philosophical research are also highlighted, especially in the context of health equity and its elusive ethical foundations.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. added 2014-09-25
    Andy Lamey (forthcoming). Ecosystems as Spontaneous Orders. Critical Review.
    The notion of a spontaneous order has a long history in the philosophy of economics, where it has been used to advance a view of markets as complex networks of information that no single mind can apprehend. Traditionally, the impossibility of grasping all of the information present in the spontaneous order of the market has been invoked as grounds for not subjecting markets to central planning. A less noted feature of the spontaneous order concept is that when it is applied (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. added 2014-09-24
    Adrianna C. Jenkins, David Dodell-Feder, Rebecca Saxe & Joshua Knobe, The Neural Bases of Directed and Spontaneous Mental State Attributions to Group Agents.
    In daily life, perceivers often need to predict and interpret the behavior of group agents, such as corporations and governments. Although research has investigated how perceivers reason about individual members of particular groups, less is known about how perceivers reason about group agents themselves. The present studies investigate how perceivers understand group agents by investigating the extent to which understanding the ‘mind’ of the group as a whole shares important properties and processes with understanding the minds of individuals. Experiment 1 (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. added 2014-09-16
    Samuli Pöyhönen (2013). Chasing Phenomena. Studies on Classification and Conceptual Change in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Dissertation, University of Helsinki
  13. added 2014-09-02
    Eric S. Nelson (2014). Heidegger, Levinas, and the Other of History. In John E. Drabinski and Eric S. Nelson (ed.), Between Levinas and Heidegger. SUNY. 51-72.
  14. added 2014-08-29
    Jonny Anomaly & Geoffrey Brennan (forthcoming). Social Norms, The Invisible Hand, and the Law. University of Queensland Law Journal 33.
  15. added 2014-08-23
    Jose Ortega Y. Gasset (1961). History as a System: And Other Essays Toward a Philosophy of History. W. W. Norton & Company.
    Contents: The Sportive Origin of the State – Unity and Diversity of Europe – Man the Technician – History as a System.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. added 2014-08-19
    Peter Garik & Yann Benétreau-Dupin (2014). Report on a Boston University Conference December 7–8, 2012 on 'How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?'. Science and Education 23 (9):1853–1873.
    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. added 2014-08-07
    Danny Frederick, Ceteris-Paribus Law-Statements Are Testable.
    It is often contended that statements of laws of nature are ceteris-paribus in some, or even in all, of the sciences. It is often objected that ceteris-paribus law-statements are vacuous or untestable. I show that such objections are mistaken and depend upon confusions between vacuity, untestability and ad hoc immunity to rejection, and between verifiability and falsifiability. I highlight some of those confusions in opponents of ceteris-paribus law-statements, such as John Earman, John Roberts and Sheldon Smith. I suggest that such (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. added 2014-08-05
    Michael Cholbi (2014). Introduction, Philosophy Through Teaching. In E. Esch R. Kraft & K. Hermberg (eds.), Philosophy through Teaching. Philosophy Documentation Center.