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Philosophy of Social Science

Edited by Michiru Nagatsu (University of Helsinki)
Assistant editors: Tarna Kannisto, Päivi Seppälä, Alessandra Basso
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  1. added 2016-05-29
    Sabina Lovibond (forthcoming). Wittgenstein, Tolstoy, and the “Apocalyptic View”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649715.
    Some aspects of Wittgenstein’s thought are considered in the light of a remark he makes about the “apocalyptic” view of the world. The influence of Tolstoy on Wittgenstein is discussed and elaborated with reference to the idea of a “form of life” as a locus of order, and also to that of “exceptionality” in an unfolding course of events—the latter setting up a connection with the “apocalyptic” theme. This imaginative backdrop remains discernible in Wittgenstein’s later philosophy, which draws upon it (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-28
    Daniel Dohrn (2011). Counterfactual Explanation in Literature and the Social Sciences. In D. Birke & M. Butter (eds.), Counterfactual Thinking, Counterfactual Writing. DeGruyter 45-61.
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  3. added 2016-05-27
    John G. Gunnell (forthcoming). Social Inquiry and the Pursuit of Reality Cora Diamond and the Problem of Criticizing From “Outside”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649714.
    Although social scientists have been devoted to discovering specific realities of social life, many theorists devoted to critical judgment have turned to philosophy in search of universal grounds of truth and reality. They have, however, worried about the problem of relativism. Although Wittgenstein has often been characterized as a relativist, Cora Diamond, inspired by G. E. M Anscombe, argues that his work, despite internal tensions, provides rational grounds for external criticism of social practices. Her argument and her critique of the (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-27
    Itay Snir & Yuval Eylon (forthcoming). Pedagogy of Non-Domination: Neo-Republican Political Theory and Critical Education. Policy Futures in Education.
    The neo-republican political philosophy (sometimes referred to as civic republicanism) advances the idea of freedom as non-domination, in an attempt to provide democracy with a solid normative foundation upon which concrete principles and institutions can be erected so as to make freedom a reality. However, attempts to develop a republican educational theory are still hesitant, and fail to take the republican radical conception of freedom to its full conclusions. This article suggests that dialogue between neo-republicanism and critical pedagogy can be (...)
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  5. added 2016-05-27
    Albert Ogien (forthcoming). Obligation and Impersonality Wittgenstein and the Nature of the Social. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649970.
    Although sociologists conceive obligation as an objective force that compels individuals to act and think according to pre-defined norms of conduct and ways of reasoning, philosophers view it as an imperative that is met through the agent’s deliberation. The aim of this article is to undermine the standard dichotomy between the deterministically sociological and the moral–philosophical views of obligation by way of contending that Wittgenstein’s view on blind obedience bears a conception of the social. I will then argue that Wittgenstein’s (...)
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  6. added 2016-05-26
    Steven James Bartlett, The Case for Government by Artificial Intelligence. Willamette University Faculty Research Website: Http://Www.Willamette.Edu/~Sbartlet/Documents/Bartlett_The%20Case%20for%20Government%20by%20Artifici al%20Intelligence.Pdf.
    THE CASE FOR GOVERNMENT BY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE -/-  Tired of election madness?  The rhetoric of politicians?  Their unreliable promises?  And less than good government? -/- Until recently, it hasn’t been hard for people to give up control to computers. Not very many people miss the effort and time required to do calculations by hand, to keep track of their finances, or to complete their tax returns manually. But relinquishing direct human control to self-driving cars (...)
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  7. added 2016-05-25
    John Dupré (forthcoming). Social Science City Center or Leafy Suburb. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649713.
    This article argues, in opposition to a common interpretation of Wittgenstein deriving from Winch, that there is nothing especially problematic about the social sciences. Familiar Wittgensteinian theses about language, notably on the open-endedness of linguistic rules and on the importance of family resemblance concepts, have great relevance not only to the social sciences but also to much of the natural sciences. The differences between scientific and ordinary language are much less sharp than Winch, and probably Wittgenstein, supposed.
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  8. added 2016-05-25
    Steven Geisz (forthcoming). Body Practice and Meditation as Philosophy in Advance. Teaching Philosophy.
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  9. added 2016-05-24
    Megan Henricks Stotts (forthcoming). Walking the Tightrope: Unrecognized Conventions and Arbitrariness. Inquiry:1-21.
    Unrecognized conventions—practices that are conventional even though their participants do not recognize them as such—play central roles in shaping our lives. They range from the indispensable (e.g. unrecognized linguistic conventions) to the insidious (e.g. some of our gender conventions). Unrecognized conventions pose a challenge for accounts of conventions because it is difficult to incorporate the distinctive arbitrariness of conventions—the fact that conventions always have alternatives—without accidentally excluding many unrecognized conventions. I develop an Accessibility Requirement that allows us to account for (...)
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  10. added 2016-05-23
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). Authenticity in Education: From Narcissism and Freedom to the Messy Interplay of Self-Exploration and Acceptable Tension. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):603-618.
    The problem with authenticity—the idea of being “true to one’s self”—is that its somewhat checkered reputation garners a complete range of favorable and unfavorable reactions. In educational settings, authenticity is lauded as one of the top two traits students desire in their teachers. Yet, authenticity is criticized for its tendency towards narcissism and self-entitlement. So, is authenticity a good or a bad thing? The purpose of this article is to develop an intimate understanding of authenticity by investigating its current interpretation (...)
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  11. added 2016-05-23
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). ‘It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times …’: Philosophy of Education in the Contemporary World. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):623-634.
    This article considers the state of philosophy of education in our current age and assesses prospects for the future of the field. I argue that as philosophers of education, we live in both the best of times and the worst of times. Developments in one key organisation, the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, are examined in relation to broader international trends. Informed by the work of Pierre Hadot, I also reflect on what it might mean to talk of philosophy (...)
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  12. added 2016-05-23
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). The Philosophy of Education as the Economy and Ecology of Pedagogical Knowledge. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):651-664.
    What does reflection on educational theory and education today actually aim at, if theory and practice can no longer be formulated as a unity? This article describes the German discourse of educational philosophy and outlines its critical view discussing the “limits of understanding subjectivity”. In the following parts it is argued that the philosophy of education of the future will encompass an “economy” as well as an “ecology” of pedagogical or educational knowledge. Here, analyses of contemporary educational practices are brought (...)
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  13. added 2016-05-23
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). Sonorous Voice and Feminist Teaching: Lessons From Cavarero. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):587-602.
    I claim that Adriana Cavarero’s concept of sonorous voice is significant in feminist teaching because, as she argues, dominant concepts of voice refer to voice in semantic terms thereby discounting voice in sonorous terms. This process of ‘devocalization’, spanning the history of Western philosophy, devalues the uniqueness embodied in each sonorous voice effecting a bias against female-sounding voices. In light of women’s history and experience of being silenced, this devaluing of sonorous voice has distinct implications for feminist teaching. A person’s (...)
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  14. added 2016-05-22
    Roberto Fumagalli (forthcoming). Decision Sciences and the New Case for Paternalism: Three Welfare-Related Justificatory Challenges. Social Choice and Welfare.
    Several authors have recently advocated a so-called new case for paternalism, according to which empirical findings from distinct decision sciences provide compelling reasons in favour of paternalistic interference. In their view, the available behavioural and neuro-psychological findings enable paternalists to address traditional anti-paternalistic objections and reliably enhance the well-being of their target agents. In this paper, I combine insights from decision-making research, moral philosophy and evidence-based policy evaluation to assess the merits of this case. In particular, I articulate and defend (...)
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  15. added 2016-05-22
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). Movement, Memory and Mathematics: Henri Bergson and the Ontology of Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):565-585.
    Using the work of philosopher Henri Bergson to examine the nature of movement and memory, this article contributes to recent research on the role of the body in learning mathematics. Our aim in this paper is to introduce the ideas of Bergson and to show how these ideas shed light on mathematics classroom activity. Bergson’s monist philosophy provides a framework for understanding the materiality of both bodies and mathematical concepts. We discuss two case studies of classrooms to show how the (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-22
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). Towards Intercultural Philosophy of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):635-649.
    In this paper, we propose an understanding of philosophy of education as cultural and intercultural work and philosophers of education as cultural and intercultural workers. In our view, the discipline of philosophy of education in North America is currently suffering from measures of insularity and singularity. It is vital that we justly and respectfully engage with and expand our knowledge and understanding of sets of conceptual and life-practice resources, and honor and learn from diverse histories, cultures, and traditions. Such honoring (...)
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  17. added 2016-05-22
    Michael A. Peters & Gert Biesta (2015). Professionalization of the University and the Profession as Macintyrean Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):551-564.
    Since the nineteenth century, the debate around the process of professionalization of higher education has been characterized by two extreme positions. For some critics the process carries the risks of instrumentalizing knowledge and of leading the university to succumb under the demands of the market or the state; for other theorists it represents a concrete opportunity for the university to open up to the real needs of society and for reorienting theoretical and fragmented disciplines towards the resolution of concrete and (...)
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  18. added 2016-05-21
    Cheshko Valentin & S. Peredyadenko, A. (2015). GENDER, REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND TECHNO<hUMANITARIAN BALANCE AS COMPONENTS OF EVOLUTIONARY RISK (EVOLUTIONAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS). In GENDER. ECOLOGY. HEALTHMaterials IV International scientific Conference dedicated to 210.anniversary of Kharkiv National Medical University (Kharkiv, 21-22 April 2015). 13-15.
    Accordingly to the concept of the three.modular evolutionary strategy of Homo sapiens developed in recent years [1] gender (self)identification should be considered as a superposition of biological, socio.cultural and techno.rational determinational adaptive systems. Each of these systems includes adaptation as a standalone unit in the co.evolutionary complex of stable evolutionary strategy of Homo sapiens. Accordingly, the content of gender (self)identity and gender – 14 – norms should be considered in three interrelated aspects . individual (ontogenetic), genetical, populational and socio.cultural ones. (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-20
    Nicolas Brisset (2016). Economics is Not Always Performative: Some Limits for Performativity. Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):160-184.
    The phenomenon of performativity has recently sparked debates about the status of the economic discourse. This paper aims to discuss the subjectivist idea that if economics ‘performs’ social reality, rather than merely reflects it, then every theory can be considered ‘true.’ My main goal is to point out three limits of performativity. First, not all theories can be performative since some do not produce empirical landmarks for agents. Second, social institutions restrict performativity. Third, I emphasize the necessity that a theory (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-20
    Nathaniel T. Wilcox (2016). Robert A. Millikan Meets the Credibility Revolution: Comment on Harrison , ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’1. Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):130-138.
    Millikan's famous oil drop experiment is scrutinized from the viewpoint of the methodological dicta of the credibility revolution.
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  21. added 2016-05-20
    Judith Favereau (2016). On the Analogy Between Field Experiments in Economics and Clinical Trials in Medicine. Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):203-222.
    Randomized experiments, as developed by Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, offer a novel, evidence-based approach to fighting poverty. This approach is original, in that it imports the methodology of clinical trials for application in development economics. This paper examines the analogy between J-PAL’s field experiments in development economics and randomized controlled trials in medicine. RCTs and randomized field experiments are commonly treated as identical, but such treatment neglects some of the major distinguishing (...)
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  22. added 2016-05-19
    Meg Stalcup & Charles Hahn (forthcoming). Cops, Cameras and the Policing of Ethics. Theoretical Criminology 20 (4).
    In this article, we explore some of the roles of cameras in policing in the United States. We outline the trajectory of key new media technologies, arguing that cameras and social media together generate the ambient surveillance through which graphic violence is now routinely captured and circulated. Drawing on Michel Foucault, we suggest that there are important intersections between this video footage and police subjectivity, and propose to look at two: recruit training at the Washington state Basic Law Enforcement Academy (...)
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  23. added 2016-05-19
    Justin P. McBrayer & Dugald Owen (forthcoming). What Quantum Mechanics Doesn't Show in Advance. Teaching Philosophy.
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  24. added 2016-05-16
    Kay Herrmann (forthcoming). Umweltmanagement und Rationalität. Der Schatten von VW: Betrieblicher Umweltschutz auf dem Prüfstand. WiSt.
    Economic pressures, mounting environmental, security and health requirements, are all critical factors that shape economic action. With regard to environmental protection, an economic entity acting as homo oeconomicus finds himself in a situation resembling a prisoner’s dilemma. Signposts for a possible resolution of this dilemma include an environmental management system, a system of environmental law based on the principles of environmental ethics, and a new conception of human nature.
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  25. added 2016-05-16
    Eric Brandstedt & Maria Emmelin (2016). The Concept of Sustainable Welfare. In Max Koch & Oksana Mont (eds.), Sustainability and the Political Economy of Welfare. Routledge 15-28.
  26. added 2016-05-15
    Cheshko Valentin & Yulia Kosova (2015). The Semantics of Transdisciplinary Concepts of Socio-Natural Co-Evolution: A Constructive Utopia, Social Verification and Evolutionary Risk. In Teodor N. Țîrdea (ed.), Strategia supravie uirii din perspectiva bioeticii, filosofiei și medicinei. Culegere de articole științifice. Vol. 21 / Sub redacția prof. univrsitar, dr. hab. în filosofie . – Chișinău: Print-Caro. Print-Caro 112-116.
    The utopian character of modern scientific theories, with the human nature as a subject, is an inevitable consequence of the presence of an imperative component of transdisciplinary human dimensional scientific knowledge. Its social function is the adaptation of the descriptive component of the theory to the given socio-cultural type that simplifies the passage of the process of social verification of the theory. The genesis of bioethics can be seen as one of the basic premises for the actualization of the anthropic (...)
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  27. added 2016-05-14
    Valentin Cheshko & Valery Glazko (2016). Сo-evolutionary biosemantics of evolutionary risk at technogenic civilization: Hiroshima, Chernobyl – Fukushima and further…. International Journal of Environmental Problems 3 (1):14-25.
    From Chernobyl to Fukushima, it became clear that the technology is a system evolutionary factor, and the consequences of man-made disasters, as the actualization of risk related to changes in the social heredity (cultural transmission) elements. The uniqueness of the human phenomenon is a characteristic of the system arising out of the nonlinear interaction of biological, cultural and techno-rationalistic adaptive modules. Distribution emerging adaptive innovation within each module is in accordance with the two algorithms that are characterized by the dominance (...)
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  28. added 2016-05-14
    V. Cheshko & O. Kuss (2016). bio-power and bio-policy: anthropological and socio-political dimensions of techno-humanitarian balance. Hyleya 107 (4):267-272.
    The sociobiological and socio-political aspects of human existence have been the subject of techno-rationalistic control and manipulation. The investigation of the mutual complementarity of anthropological and ontological paradigms under these circumstances is the main purpose of present publication. The comparative conceptual analysis of the bio-power and bio-politics in the mentality of the modern technological civilization is a main method of the research. The methodological and philosophical analogy of biological and social engineering allows combining them in the nature and social (...)
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  29. added 2016-05-14
    Valentin T. Cheshko, Lida V. Ivanitskaya & Yulia V. Kosova (2014). Configuration of Stable Evolutionary Strategy of Homo Sapiens and Evolutionary Risks of Technological Civilization (the Conceptual Model Essay). Biogeosystem Technique, 1 (1):58-68.
    Stable evolutionary strategy of Homo sapiens (SESH) is built in accordance with the modular and hierarchical principle and consists of the same type of self-replicating elements, i.e. is a system of systems. On the top level of the organization of SESH is the superposition of genetic, social, cultural and techno-rationalistic complexes. The components of this triad differ in the mechanism of cycles of generation - replication - transmission - fixing/elimination of adoptively relevant information. This mechanism is implemented either in accordance (...)
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  30. added 2016-05-14
    Valentin Cheshko & Valery Glazko (2013). August - 48. The phenomenon of "proletarian science". Publ House NEFTEGAZ.
    The book is an attempt to comparative system investigation of the phenomenon of politicized science - primarily in an example of the so-called "Soviet Michurin genetics and creative Darwinism". The main system factor was long-term competition between schools and groups in scientific community in a totalitarian social environment\. In accordance to this concept politicization of science is not unique feathure of totalitarian political regimes but an extreme manifestation of typical for post-academician science at modern society processes of interaction tions between (...)
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  31. added 2016-05-14
    Cheshko Valentin Glazko Valery I. (ed.) (2009). High Hume (Bio-power and Bio-policy in Society of Risk). Russian State Agrarian University - Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy.
    Human simultaneously is the acting person of a few autonomous and interdepending forms of evolutional process. Accordingly, it is possible to select three forms of adaptation and three constituents of evolutional strategy of survival of humanity – biological, sociocultural and technological adaptations. The actual and potential consequences of development of so-called High Hume technologies (technologies of the guided evolution)  most essential from major technological adaptations of humanity  are analyzed. The phenomenon of bio-power within the framework of global coevolutional (...)
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  32. added 2016-05-14
    V. Cheshko & Valery Glazko (eds.) (2009). High Hume (Bio-power and Bio-policy in Society of Risk). Russian State Agrarian University - Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy.
    Human simultaneously is the acting person of a few autonomous and interdepending forms of evolutional process. Accordingly, it is possible to select three forms of adaptation and three constituents of evolutional strategy of survival of humanity – biological, sociocultural and technological adaptations. The actual and potential consequences of development of so-called High Hume technologies (technologies of the guided evolution)  most essential from major technological adaptations of humanity  are analyzed. The phenomenon of bio-power within the framework of global coevolutional (...)
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  33. added 2016-05-11
    Marc Champagne (2016). Diagrams of the Past: How Timelines Can Aid the Growth of Historical Knowledge. Cognitive Semiotics 9 (1):11-44.
    Historians occasionally use timelines, but many seem to regard such signs merely as ways of visually summarizing results that are presumably better expressed in prose. Challenging this language-centered view, I suggest that timelines might assist the generation of novel historical insights. To show this, I begin by looking at studies confirming the cognitive benefits of diagrams like timelines. I then try to survey the remarkable diversity of timelines by analyzing actual examples. Finally, having conveyed this (mostly untapped) potential, I argue (...)
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  34. added 2016-05-11
    David G. Dick (2016). Transformable Goods and the Limits of What Money Can Buy. Moral Philosophy and Politics:online.
    There are some things money literally cannot buy. Invariably transformable goods are such things because when they are exchanged for money, they become something else. These goods are destroyed rather than transferred in monetary exchanges. They mark out an impassable limit beyond which money and the market cannot reach. They cannot be for sale, in the strongest and most literal sense. Variably transformable goods are similar. They can be destroyed when offered or exchanged for money, but they differ in their (...)
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  35. added 2016-05-11
    Chris Walmsley, Karolina Staros, Amanda Meyer, Amy Ing, Andrew Evans, Wayne Fuqua, David Hartmann & Thomas Valey (2015). The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices. Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical tensions in research. The method employed was “protocol analysis,” a talk-aloud technique pioneered by cognitive scientists for the analysis of expert performance. The participants were asked to verbalize their normally unexpressed thought processes as they responded to the scenarios, and to make recommendations for courses of action. We found that experts spent more (...)
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  36. added 2016-05-11
    Sandel Michael (2012). What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets. Macmillan.
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  37. added 2016-05-10
    Alin Olteanu, Maria Kambouri & Andrew Stables (forthcoming). Predicating From an Early Age: Edusemiotics and the Potential of Children’s Preconceptions. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    This paper aims to explain how semiotics and constructivism can collaborate in an educational epistemology by developing a joint approach to prescientific conceptions. Empirical data and findings of constructivist research are interpreted in the light of Peirce’s semiotics. Peirce’s semiotics is an anti-psychologistic logic and relational logic. Constructivism was traditionally developed within psychology and sociology and, therefore, some incompatibilities can be expected between these two schools. While acknowledging the differences, we explain that constructivism and semiotics share the assumption of realism (...)
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  38. added 2016-05-10
    Daniel Nolan (forthcoming). The Possibilities of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History.
  39. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). Review of Gert J.J. Biesta, The Beautiful Risk of Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):413-418.
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  40. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). Jesuit Eloquentia Perfecta and Theotropic Logology. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):403-412.
    This essay takes a rhetorical pragmatist perspective on current questions concerning educational goals and pedagogical practices. It begins by considering some challenges to rhetorical approaches to education, placing those challenges in the theoretical context of their posing. The essay then describes one current rhetorical approach—based on Kenneth Burke’s dramatism and logology—and uses it to understand and redescribe another rhetorical approach—Jesuit teaching of eloquentia perfecta. Proceeding in this way, the essay presents both a general theoretical framework for discussing educational aims and (...)
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  41. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). Equipment for Thinking: Or Why Kenneth Burke is Still Worth Reading. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):363-375.
    In a market place crowded with practical rhetoric books what educational value could a challenging work such as Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric of Motives possibly have? Burke knows but doesn’t use the terminology of the classical art and rather than analysing the persuasive rhetoric of well-known speeches to equip us with strategies, he weaves his way around literary texts, teasing out meanings that their authors something intended, sometimes did not. Yet, despite such difficulties, A Rhetoric of Motives is a practical (...)
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  42. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). The Who and the What of Educational Cosmopolitanism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):423-440.
    In the educational strand of cosmopolitanism, much attention has been placed on theorizing and describing who is cosmopolitan. It has been argued that cosmopolitan sensibilities negotiate and/or embody such paradoxes as rootedness and rootlessness, local and global concerns, private and public identities. Concurrently, cosmopolitanism has also been formulated as a globally-minded project for and ethico-political responsibility to human rights and global justice. Such articulations underscore cosmopolitanism in anthropocentric terms. People can be cosmopolitan and cosmopolitan projects aim to cultivate cosmopolitan subjectivities. (...)
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  43. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). An Appetite for Transcendence: A Response to Doris Santoro’s and Samuel Rocha’s Review of The Beautiful Risk of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):419-422.
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  44. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). National Identity Within the National Museum: Subjectification Within Socialization. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):385-402.
    Rhetorician Kenneth Burke’s theory of identification usefully demonstrates how communities are able to engage with difficult, opposing viewpoints as they develop or maintain a sense of shared identity. Identification, “establishing a shared sense of values, attitudes, and interests with [an audience],” is promoted dialogically in the modern national museum in a way that it is difficult for classrooms to emulate. This article examines dialogic national identification particularly through the focus in museums on certain key objects that serve as what Burke (...)
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  45. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). Form, Experience and the Centrality of Rhetoric to Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):377-384.
    This essay notes a resurgence of interest in rhetorical studies on the appeal of form, grounded in the work of rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke. The essay argues that form is not only a way to structure discourses, it is a way to structure experience. Form is foundational in creating perceptions and thus experiences. Form is also highly rhetorical, in that how we structure our world carries social and ideological implications. The essay thus argues that an understanding of form as foundational (...)
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  46. added 2016-05-10
    Ronald Soetaert & Kris Rutten (2015). Burke’s Pentad as a Guide for Symbol-Using Citizens. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):349-362.
    Ever since the rhetorical turn in education, education scholars have recognized the importance of rhetoric in constructing and mediating human society. They have turned to rhetorical theory to come to terms with this rhetorically mediated reality and to engage students as critical citizens within it. Much of this work draws on rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke, but much of Burke’s work remains unexplored in this area. We argue that his theories can be part of a user’s guide to educate students about (...)
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  47. added 2016-05-10
    Julie Zahle, Byron Kaldis, Alban Bouvier, Paul Roth, Eleonora Montuschi, James Bohman, Stephen Turner, Alison Wylie & Jesus Zamora-Bonilla (2014). Special Issue: Selected Papers From the ENPOSS Meeting, Venice 3-4 September 2013. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (1).
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  48. added 2016-05-09
    Antti Saari (forthcoming). Knowledge Without Contexts? A Foucauldian Analysis of E.L. Thorndike’s Positivist Educational Research. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    The article discusses the allegedly decontextualized and ahistorical traits in positivist educational research and curriculum by examining its emergence in early twentieth-century empirical education. Edward Lee Thorndike’s educational psychology is analyzed as a case in point. It will be shown that Thorndike’s positivist educational psychology stressed the need to account for the reality of schooling and to produce knowledge of the actual contexts of education. Furthermore, a historical analysis informed by Michel Foucault’s history of the human sciences reveals that there (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-07
    Áine Mahon (2016). Moral Education and Literature: On Cora Diamond and Eimear McBride. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (1).
    I argue in this paper for the rich and subtle connections between moral philosophy and literature as they are articulated and explored in the work of the contemporary American philosopher, Cora Diamond. In its significance for broader educational debates—specifically, debates regarding the value of the arts and humanities in a context of global economic collapse—Diamond's work is strikingly original. I argue that it offers much more to educators than the related work of her Anglo-American contemporaries, among them Martha Nussbaum and (...)
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  50. added 2016-05-07
    Vasco D'agnese (2016). The Essential Uncertainty of Thinking: Education and Subject in John Dewey. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (1):n/a-n/a.
    In this paper, I analyse the Deweyan account of thinking and subject and discuss the educational consequences that follow from such an account. I argue that despite the grouping of thinking and reflective thought that has largely appeared in the interpretation of Deweyan work, Dewey discloses an inescapable uncertainty at the core of human thinking. This move is even more challenging given Dewey's firm faith in the power of intelligent action, and in education as the means by which human beings (...)
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