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  1. A. Abbott (2014). The Problem of Excess. Sociological Theory 32 (1):1-26.
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  2. Andrew Abbott (2007). Against Narrative: A Preface to Lyrical Sociology. Sociological Theory 25 (1):67-99.
    This article develops a concept of lyrical sociology, a sociology I oppose to narrative sociology, by which I mean standard quantitative inquiry with its "narratives" of variables as well as those parts of qualitative sociology that take a narrative and explanatory approach to social life. Lyrical sociology is characterized by an engaged, nonironic stance toward its object of analysis, by specific location of both its subject and its object in social space, and by a momentaneous conception of social time. Lyrical (...)
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  3. Andrew Abbott (2005). Linked Ecologies: States and Universities as Environments for Professions. Sociological Theory 23 (3):245-274.
    In this article I generalize ecological theory by developing the notion of separate but linked ecologies. I characterize an ecology by its set of actors, its set of locations, and the relation it involves between these. I then develop two central concepts for the linkage of ecologies: hinges and avatars. The first are issues or strategies that "work" in both ecologies at once. The second are attempts to institutionalize in one ecology a copy or colony of an actor in another. (...)
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  4. Andrew Abbott (1988). Transcending General Linear Reality. Sociological Theory 6 (2):169-186.
    This paper argues that the dominance of linear models has led many sociologists to construe the social world in terms of a "general linear reality." This reality assumes (1) that the social world consists of fixed entities with variable attributes, (2) that cause cannot flow from "small" to "large" attributes/events, (3) that causal attributes have only one causal pattern at once, (4) that the sequence of events does not influence their outcome, (5) that the "careers" of entities are largely independent, (...)
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  5. James R. Abbott (1999). E. Digby Baltzell Reconsidered: A Reply to Samuel Z. Klausner. Sociological Theory 17 (1):102-107.
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  6. Nahla Abdo-Zubi (ed.) (1996). Sociological Thought: Beyond Eurocentric Theory. Canadian Scholars' Press.
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  7. Peter Abell (2000). Putting Social Theory Right? Sociological Theory 18 (3):518-523.
    The paper considers some of the implications of Coleman Diagrams in the context of the study of social interaction at the microlevel. Such studies cannot be adequately modeled without improved theoretical rigor. The Theory of Comparative Narratives is advanced as one possible analytical framework of the modeling of interactions.
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  8. Peter Abell (1991). Homo Sociologicus: Do We Need Him/Her? Sociological Theory 9 (2):195-198.
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  9. Gabriel Abend (2008). The Meaning of 'Theory'. Sociological Theory 26 (2):173 - 199.
    'Theory' is one of the most important words in the lexicon of contemporary sociology. Yet, their ubiquity notwithstanding, it is quite unclear what sociologists mean by the words 'theory,' 'theoretical,' and 'theorize.' I argue that confusions about the meaning of 'theory' have brought about undesirable consequences, including conceptual muddles and even downright miscommunication. In this paper I tackle two questions: (a) what does 'theory' mean in the sociological language?; and (b) what ought 'theory' to mean in the sociological language? I (...)
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  10. Gabriel Abend (2008). The Meaning of ‘Theory’. Sociological Theory 26 (2):173-199.
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  11. Gabriel Abend (2006). Styles of Sociological Thought: Sociologies, Epistemologies, and the Mexican and U.S. Quests for Truth. Sociological Theory 24 (1):1 - 41.
    Both U.S. and Mexican sociologies allege that they are in the business of making true scientific knowledge claims about the social world. Conventional conceptions of science notwithstanding, I demonstrate that their claims to truth and scientificity are based on alternative epistemological grounds. Drawing a random sample of nonquantitative articles from four leading journals, I show that, first, they assign a different role to theories, and indeed they have dissimilar understandings of what a theory should consist of. Second, whereas U.S. sociology (...)
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  12. Gabriel Abend (2006). Styles of Sociological Thought: Sociologies, Epistemologies, and the Mexican and U.S. Quests for Truth. Sociological Theory 24 (1):1-41.
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  13. S. Abrutyn & A. S. Mueller (2014). The Socioemotional Foundations of Suicide: A Microsociological View of Durkheim's Suicide. Sociological Theory 32 (4):327-351.
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  14. Seth Abrutyn (2009). Toward a General Theory of Institutional Autonomy. Sociological Theory 27 (4):449 - 465.
    Institutional differentiation has been one of the central concerns of sociology since the days of Auguste Comte. However, the overarching tendency among institutionalists such as Durkheim or Spencer has been to treat the process of differentiation from a macro, "outside in" perspective. Missing from this analysis is how institutional differentiation occurs from the "inside out, "or through the efforts and struggles of individual and corporate actors. Despite the recent efforts of the "new institutionalism" to fill in this gap, a closer (...)
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  15. Gabriel A. Acevedo (2005). Turning Anomie on its Head: Fatalism as Durkheim's Concealed and Multidimensional Alienation Theory. Sociological Theory 23 (1):75-85.
    Durkheim's underdeveloped notion of fatalism is the keystone for a bridge between two conceptual categories central to Marxian and Durkheimian theory: alienation and anomie. Durkheim does not necessarily disagree with Marx that excessive regulation can be socially damaging but chooses to highlight the effects of under- regulation. A Durkheimian critique of overregulation becomes possible if we turn away from anomie and toward Durkheim's idea of fatalism-a concept that I will argue here is unexpectedly consistent with Marx's notion of alienation. We (...)
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  16. Christopher Adair-Toteff (1995). Ferdinand Tonnies: Utopian Visionary. Sociological Theory 13 (1):58-65.
    Among the founders of classical German sociology, Ferdinand Tonnies is still relatively neglected. Many reasons are given, but the most widespread and the most damning is that Tonnies is a pessimist who wished, in the face of modernity, to return to the supposed Golden Age of rural Germany, when the community, ruled by patriarchs, gathered on the land. This interpretation is fundamentally flawed: although Tonnies wanted to describe the rootless, ruthless, calculating individuals of modern society, he wished to recall the (...)
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  17. Barbara Adam, Ulrich Beck & Joost van Loon (eds.) (2000). The Risk Society and Beyond: Critical Issues for Social Theory. Sage.
    Ulrich Beck's best selling Risk Society established risk on the sociological agenda. It brought together a wide range of issues centering on environmental, health and personal risk, provided a rallying ground for researchers and activists in a variety of social movements and acted as a reference point for state and local policies in risk management. The Risk Society and Beyond charts the progress of Beck's ideas and traces their evolution. It demonstrates why the issues raised by Beck reverberate widely throughout (...)
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  18. Daniel E. Adkins & Stephen Vaisey (2009). Toward a Unified Stratification Theory: Structure, Genome, and Status Across Human Societies. Sociological Theory 27 (2):99-121.
    While social scientists and geneticists have a shared interest in the personal characteristics instrumental to status attainment, little has been done to integrate these disparate perspectives. This is unfortunate, as the perspectives offer complementary insights, which, if properly combined, stand to substantially improve understanding of the stratification process. This article synthesizes research from the social sciences and genetics to develop a multistage theory of how social structure moderates the influence of the genome on status outcomes. Its thesis is that the (...)
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  19. Daniel E. Adkins & Stephen Vaisey (2009). Toward a Unified Stratification Theory: Structure, Genome, and Status Across Human Societies. Sociological Theory 27 (2):99-121.
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  20. Lisa Adkins (2004). Feminist Social Theory. In Austin Harrington (ed.), Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. OUP Oxford
  21. Theodor W. Adorno, Andrew J. Perrin & Lars Jarkko (2005). Opinion Research and Publicness (Meinungsforschung Und Öffentlichkeit). Sociological Theory 23 (1):116-123.
    We present a short introduction to, and the first English language translation of, Theodor W. Adorno's 1964 article, "Meinungsforschung und Öffentlichkeit." In this article, Adorno situates the misunderstanding of public opinion within a dialectic of elements of publicness itself: empirical publicness' dependence on a normative ideology of publicness, and modern publicness' tendency to undermine its own principles. He also locates it in the dual role of mass media as both fora for the expression of opinion and, as he calls them, (...)
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  22. Theodor W. Adorno, Andrew J. Perrin & Lars Jarkko (2005). Opinion Research and Publicness. Sociological Theory 23 (1):116-123.
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  23. A. Adut (2012). A Theory of the Public Sphere. Sociological Theory 30 (4):238-262.
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  24. Ari Adut (2012). A Theory of the Public Sphere. Sociological Theory 30 (4):238 - 262.
    The dominant approach to the public sphere is characterized by idealism and normativism. It overemphasizes civic-minded or civil discourse, envisions unrealistically egalitarian and widespread participation, has difficulty dealing with consequential public events, and neglects the spatial core of the public sphere and the effects of visibility. I propose a semiotic theory that approaches the public sphere through general sensory access. This approach enables a superior understanding of all public events, discursive or otherwise. It also captures the dialectical relationship between the (...)
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  25. Joseph Agassi (1998). Book Review : Shlomo Deshen, Charles S. Liebman, and Moshe Shokeid, Eds., Israeli Judaism: The Sociology of Religion in Israel, Studies of Israeli Society, Volume VII. Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, Nj, 1995. Pp. XIV + 386. $44.95 (Cloth), $24.95 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (3):471-477.
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  26. Joseph Agassi (1994). "The DC-10 Case: A Study in Applied Ethics, Technology and Society", Edited by John H. Fielder and Douglas Birch. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (3):390.
  27. Maria Carmela Agodi (1991). Rational Fools or Foolish Rationalists?: Bringing Meaning Back In. Sociological Theory 9 (2):199-205.
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  28. Kevin Aho (2007). Simmel on Acceleration, Boredom, and Extreme Aesthesia. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):447-462.
    By focusing on the unique velocity and over-stimulation of metropolitan life, Georg Simmel pioneered an interpretation of cultural boredom that has had a significant impact on contemporary social theory by viewing it through the modern experience of time-pressure and social acceleration. This paper explores Simmel's account of boredom by showing how--in the frenzy of modern life--it has become increasingly difficult to qualitatively distinguish which choices and commitments actually matter to us. Furthermore, this emotional indifference invariably pushes us towards more excessive (...)
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  29. Jeffrey Alexander (1989). Against Historicism/ for Theory: A Reply to Levine. Sociological Theory 7 (1):118-120.
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  30. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2004). Cultural Pragmatics: Social Performance Between Ritual and Strategy. Sociological Theory 22 (4):527-573.
    From its very beginnings, the social study of culture has been polarized between structuralist theories that treat meaning as a text and investigate the patterning that provides relative autonomy and pragmatist theories that treat meaning as emerging from the contingencies of individual and collective action-so-called practices-and that analyze cultural patterns as reflections of power and material interest. In this article, I present a theory of cultural pragmatics that transcends this division, bringing meaning structures, contingency, power, and materiality together in a (...)
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  31. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2004). Cultural Pragmatics: Social Performance Between Ritual and Strategy. Sociological Theory 22 (4):527-573.
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  32. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2004). From the Depths of Despair: Performance, Counterperformance, and "September 11". Sociological Theory 22 (1):88-105.
    After introducing a perspective on terrorism as postpolitical and after establishing the criteria for success that are immanent in this form of antipolitical action, this essay interprets September 11, 2001, and its aftermath inside a cultural-sociological perspective. After introducing a macro-model of social performance that combines structural and semiotic with pragmatic and power-oriented dimensions, I show how the terrorist attack on New York City and the counterattacks that immediately occurred in response can be viewed as an iteration of the performance/counterperformance (...)
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  33. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2004). From the Depths of Despair: Performance, Counterperformance, and "September 11". Sociological Theory 22 (1):88-105.
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  34. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2001). The Long and Winding Road: Civil Repair of Intimate Injustice. Sociological Theory 19 (3):371-400.
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  35. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2001). The Long and Winding Road: Civil Repair of Intimate Injustice. Sociological Theory 19 (3):371-400.
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  36. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2001). Theorizing the "Modes of Incorporation": Assimilation, Hyphenation, and Multiculturalism as Varieties of Civil Participation. Sociological Theory 19 (3):237-249.
  37. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2001). Theorizing the "Modes of Incorporation": Assimilation, Hyphenation, and Multiculturalism as Varieties of Civil Participation. Sociological Theory 19 (3):237-249.
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  38. Jeffrey C. Alexander (ed.) (1998). Neofunctionalism and After. Blackwell Publishers.
    "Neofunctionalism and After" brings together for the first time in one volume all of Alexander's writings on neofunctionalism, the present volume also contains ...
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  39. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1991). Must We Choose Between Criticism and Faith? Reflections on the Later Work of Bernard Barber. Sociological Theory 9 (1):124-128.
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  40. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1991). Sociological Theory and the Claim to Reason: Why the End is Not in Sight. Sociological Theory 9 (2):147-153.
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  41. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1988). Parsons' "Structure" in American Sociology. Sociological Theory 6 (1):96-102.
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  42. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1987). The Social Requisites for Altruism and Voluntarism: Some Notes on What Makes a Sector Independent. Sociological Theory 5 (2):165-171.
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  43. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1984). Three Models of Culture and Society Relations: Toward an Analysis of Watergate. Sociological Theory 2:290-314.
    One of the most important contributions of the Parsonian tradition has been its conceptualization of the relative autonomy and mutual interpenetration of culture and social systems. The first part of this chapter defines three ideal types of empirical relationships between culture and society: specification, refraction, and columnization. Each is related to different configurations of social structure and culture and, in turn, to different degrees of social conflict. The second part of the chapter uses this typology to illuminate critical aspects of (...)
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  44. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1984). The Parsons Revival in German Sociology. Sociological Theory 2:394-412.
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  45. Jeffrey C. Alexander & Paul Colomy (1985). Toward Neo-Functionalism. Sociological Theory 3 (2):11-23.
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  46. Jeffrey C. Alexander & Giuseppe Sciortino (1996). On Choosing One's Intellectual Predecessors: The Reductionism of Camic's Treatment of Parsons and the Institutionalists. Sociological Theory 14 (2):154-171.
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  47. Joan Alway (1995). The Trouble with Gender: Tales of the Still-Missing Feminist Revolution in Sociological Theory. Sociological Theory 13 (3):209-228.
    Why do sociological theorists remain uninterested in and resistant to feminist theory? Notwithstanding indications of increasing openness to feminist theory, journals and texts on sociological theory reflect a continuing pattern of neglect. I identify reasons for this pattern, including tensions resulting from the introduction of gender as a central analytical category: Not only does gender challenge the dichotomous categories that define sociology's boundaries and identity, it also displaces the discipline's central problematic of modernity. The significance of this displacement is apparent (...)
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  48. M. Ananth (2001). Book Review: Explaining Culture: A Naturalistic Approach. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):563-571.
  49. Digby Anderson (1986). Literary Aspects of Sociological Redescription: A Comment on Papers by Mulkay and Gilbert and O'Neill. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 16 (1):83-88.
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  50. Kevin Anderson (1993). On Hegel and the Rise of Social Theory: A Critical Appreciation of Herbert Marcuse's Reason and Revolution, Fifty Years Later. Sociological Theory 11 (3):243-267.
    Marcuse's Reason and Revolution was the first Hegelian Marxist text to appear in English, the first systematic study of Hegel by a Marxist, and the first work in English to discuss the young Marx seriously. It introduced Hegelian and Marxist concepts such as alienation, subjectivity, negativity, and the Frankfurt School's critique of positivism to a wide audience in the United States. When the book first appeared, it was attacked sharply from the standpoint of empiricism and positivism by Sidney Hook, among (...)
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