Related categories
Subcategories:
1751 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 1751
Material to categorize
  1. Annarita Angelini & Pierre Caye (eds.) (2007). Il Pensiero Simbolico Nella Prima Età Moderna. Leo S. Olschki Editore.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Christopher Bartel (2014). Art and Pornography. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (4):510-512.
  3. Joseph Edwin Barton (1932). Purpose and Admiration a Lay Study of the Visual Arts. Christophers.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Burcu Baykan (2015). Into the Body of Another: Strange Couplings and Unnatural Alliances of "Harlequin Coat". In Matthew Causey Emma Meehan (ed.), Through the Virtual, Toward the Real: The Performing Subject in the Space of Technology. Palgrave Macmillan 17-33.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Burcu Baykan (2014). Becoming-Other: Ontology and Aesthetics in the Critical Theory of Gilles Deleuze. In DAKAM LIT CRI '14/ III. Literary Criticism Conference: World Literature and LIterary Criticism Proceedings Book. DAKAM Publishing 55-60.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Errol Bedford & R. M. Meager (1966). Seeing Paintings. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 40:47-84.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Peg Zeglin Brand (2015). The Role of Luck in Originality and Creativity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):31-55.
    In this article I explore the concept of originality from several viewpoints. Within the world of printmaking, I show that while print dealers may draw attention to originality in order to enhance economic value, artists emphasize the aesthetic value of a work based on the freedom to express artistic intent and to experiment with techniques of the medium. Within the worlds of philosophy and to some extent, psychology, “originality” has been misleadingly tied to the notions of “creativity” and “genius,” thereby (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. G. K. Chesterton (1997). Famous Paintings. The Chesterton Review 23 (1/2):21-25.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Christianus (1962). El Greco. Augustinianum 2 (2):460-460.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Pietro Conte (2015). The Panofsky-Newman Controversy. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (2):87-97.
    Starting from Erwin Panofsky’s well-known polemical exchange of letters with Barnett Newman, and taking into account some few hints to contemporary artists which can be found into the Princeton Professor’s private correspondence, this essay deals with the theoretical reasons why one of the most original and influent art historians of the whole 20th Century has never really come to terms with even the notion of “abstract” art. It then focuses on the seemingly paradoxical concept of “abstract sublime” as proposed by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Roy T. Cook & Aaron Meskin (2015). Comics, Prints, and Multiplicity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):57-67.
    Comics comprise a hybrid art form descended from printmaking and mostly made using print technologies. But comics are an art form in their own right and do not belong to the art form of printmaking. We explore some features art comics and fine art prints do and do not have in common. Although most fine art prints and comics are multiple artworks, it is not obvious whether the multiple instances of comics and prints are artworks in their own right. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Jean Dabb (1998). Marginal Sculpture in Medieval France: Towards the Deciphering of an Enigmatic Pictorial Language. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (1):209-211.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Elena Fell (2014). Phenomenologies of Art and Vision: A Post-Analytic Turn. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (4):504-506.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Jane Forsey (2015). Collision: The Puzzle of Chardin. Evental Aesthetics 4 (1):88-95.
    FEATURED IN EVENTAL AESTHETICS RETROSPECTIVE 1. LOOKING BACK AT 10 ISSUES OF EVENTAL AESTHETICS. This paper addresses problems in the interpretation of Chardin’s still life paintings, which are disconcerting because they are so out of step with those of his contemporaries. It is suggested that, with the application of Kantian aesthetics, Chardin can be best understood as representing things in themselves as well as the limits of language and understanding.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Stanislas Fumet (1954). La Poésie À Travers les Arts. Alsatia.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Markus Gabriel (2009). The Art of Skepticism and the Skepticism of Art. Philosophy Today 53 (1):58-69.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Dickie George (1985). Evaluating Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. K. E. Gover (2015). Are All Multiples the Same? The Problematic Nature of the Limited Edition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):69-80.
    The aim of this inquiry is to determine whether printmaking is best understood ontologically as analogous to a work-performance relation. Are prints the visual analogue of symphonies? My motivation for pursuing the comparison of printmaking to music is twofold. First, because relatively little has been written on the ontology of fine art prints, our use of an already developed body of scholarship will help us to gain some traction on the question. Second, within the existing literature on the ontology of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Louise Hanson (2015). Conceptual Art and the Acquaintance Principle. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):247-258.
    The Acquaintance Principle has been the subject of extensive debate in philosophical aesthetics. In one of the most recent developments, it has become popular to claim that some works of conceptual art are counterexamples to it. It is further claimed that this is a genuinely new problem in the sense that it is a problem even for versions of the Acquaintance Principle modified to deal with previous objections. I argue that this is essentially correct; however, the claim as it stands (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Robert Hopkins (2015). Reproductive Prints as Aesthetic Surrogates. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):11-21.
    Reproductive prints allow us to engage with the aesthetic/artistic character of the pictures that are their sources. But prints clearly differ from their sources in various striking ways. How, then, are they able to make engagement possible? I consider various answers. Most treat prints as acting as surrogates for the source: in sharing its aesthetic properties, in resembling it in overall aesthetic character, in being aesthetically transparent to it, or in allowing us to imagine its aesthetic character in sufficiently rich (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Kaifeng Huang (2005). Shen Mei Jia Zhi Lun =. Yunnan Ren Min Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Nobutaka Imamura (2005). The Position of the Narrator in Roger de Piles' Description of Paintings. Bigaku 56 (2):14-27.
    The theory of paintings argued by Roger de Piles laid more emphasis on visual pleasure of paintings than its function of instruction. Therefore, while many contemporaries considered judgement on paintings to be inseparable with such criteria as historical facts, theological validity, geometric correctness of perspective, and verisimilitude borrowed from poesy, de Piles insisted that such criteria were not the essential parts of painting. For de Piles, the fundamental principle of paintings consists in its visual effect and the ability to imitate (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. David W. Janzen (2015). Collision: Poverty/Line: Aesthetic and Political Subjects in Santiago Sierra’s “Line” Photographs. Evental Aesthetics 4 (1):63-70.
    FEATURED IN EVENTAL AESTHETICS RETROSPECTIVE 1. LOOKING BACK AT 10 ISSUES OF EVENTAL AESTHETICS. This Collision examines photographs of Santiago Sierra’s “Line” installations, discovering in these works a unique formulation of the tension between the social and formal aspects of contemporary art. Developing the philosophical implications of this formulation, this essay connects divergent trajectories embodied by the work to divergent trajectories in contemporary aesthetic theory. Developing the socio-political approach, I draw on recent work by Claire Bishop who, emphasizing the distinction (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Christopher D. Johnson (2015). Wandering Towards Bruno: Synderesis and “Synthetic Intuition”. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (2):7-26.
    Focusing on the faculty of intuition, my essay considers different ways that Aby Warburg and Erwin Panofsky interpret the late Renaissance cosmographer, Giordano Bruno. It argues that Warburg, in the last year of his life and with the help of Ernst Cassirer, appropriates the concept of synderesis from Bruno not only to rethink the Nachleben der Antike but also to inscribe himself in the history of word and image, a history that admits the irrational and the mystical as much as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Joachim Knape & Elisabeth Grüner (eds.) (2007). Bildrhetorik. Koerner.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Iro Laskari & Anna Laskari (2010). Live Puzzle: Kaleidoscopic Narratives Through Spatio-Temporal Montage. Technoetic Arts 8 (2):199-206.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Hans Maes (2015). What Is a Portrait? British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (3):303-322.
    What I will aim for in answering the title question is extensional adequacy, that is, I will try to formulate an account that captures as much of the extension as possible of what we ordinarily think counts as a portrait. Two philosophers have recently and independently from one another embarked on the same project. Cynthia Freeland’s theory of portraiture, as it is developed in her book, Portraits and Persons, is discussed in Sections 1 and 2 of this paper. Sections 3 (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Christy Mag Uidhir (2015). Introduction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):1-8.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Dorothea McEwan (2015). Bringing Light Into Darkness. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (2):27-39.
    The art historian Fritz Saxl, Aby Warburg’s librarian and trusted friend, researched apart from art historical topics images of gods of late antiquity, Oriental and Greek mystery cults and the pictorial presentation of dialogue in early Christian art. This research led him to Mithraism, the images and practices of this mystery cult and in particular how Oriental thought flowed into Occidental thought. Saxl was engaged in this work for many years. In this article I touch upon Saxl’s extended correspondence with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Jennifer A. McMahon, Session Title: Art History and Philosophy.
    This symposium is inspired by the round tables organised by James Elkins in Cork, Ireland and Chicago which aimed to create a dialogue between art historians and philosophers on concepts which are central to the way both disciplines conduct their respective endeavours. For our symposium, art historians and philosophers will discuss topics and concepts which are likely to be given different interpretations by the respective disciplines. We will attempt to bridge the gap between the respective interpretations by inviting a closer (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Linnar Priimägi (2002). Pure Visual Metaphor. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):725-739.
    Salvador Dalí’s oilpainting Hallucination partielle. Six apparitions de Lénine sur un piano (1931) has been considered to be one of the most difficult works to interpret. O. Zaslavskii has analyzed it, using the sound of the words in title and the items depicted on the masterpiece, “the phonetic subtext”. Obviously, Zaslavskii’s interpretation is based on Osip Mandelstam’s poem “Grand piano” (1931), that in the context of Russian language associates the piano ( ) with the French Revolution. Nevertheless, Zaslavskii’s final conclusion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Zhenglun Qiu (2007). Shen Mei Jia Zhi Qu Xiang Yan Jiu. Wen Hua Yi Shu Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Stefan Ristic (2010). Identity of the Work of Art. Filozofija I Društvo 21 (2):293-308.
    The paper intends to determine the identity of the work of art in visual arts, music and literature. The discussion is of ontological nature. Particular attention is given to the problem of imitation of works of art in different arts, making a distinction between two types of imitation: fakes and forgeries. The first type is found only within the arts where the work of art is a singular physical object, i.e. with the so called autographic arts, whereas the second type (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Jon Robson (2013). The Art of Comics—A Philosophical Approach. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):ayt001.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Martina Sauer (2013-4-15). John Michael Krois. Bildkörper und Körperschema. Schriften zur Verkörperungstheorie ikonischer Formen. [REVIEW] Sehepunkte. Rezensionsjournal für Geschichtswissenschaften 13 (4).
  36. Saida Seddik, سينما القضية الفلسطينية.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Sonia Sedivy (2016). Beauty and The End of Art, Wittgenstein, Plurality and Perception. Bloomsbury.
  38. Dominic Smith (2015). On Technological Ground: The Art of Torsten Lauschmann. Evental Aesthetics 4 (2):138-170.
    This essay considers the relationship between the work of contemporary artist Torsten Lauschmann and themes in a growing area of research: philosophy of technology. Themes considered include relations between technology and contemporary urban dwelling, technology and the “everyday,” and Heidegger’s problematic but canonical understanding of technology not as a set of “mere means” but as a “way of revealing.” I argue that Lauschmann’s art renders these themes relevant for our increasingly technologically mediated forms of everyday experience by engaging in a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Ken Wilder (2015). Vermeer: Interruptions, Exclusions, and ‘Imagining Seeing’. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):38-59.
    This article proposes an essential interrelatedness of Vermeer’s strategies of inclusion and exclusion of an implied beholder. I will argue that such strategies mutually reinforce each other, to the extent that the plausibility of one is arguably dependent upon the possibility of the other. This is evidenced by Vermeer’s subtle manipulations of pictorial space, and the article traces a decisive shift in his familiar use of barriers from those aimed at an external presence to those oriented towards an internal beholder. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Depiction
  1. Solveig Aasen (2016). Pictures, Presence and Visibility. Philosophical Studies 173 (1):187-203.
    This paper outlines a ‘perceptual account’ of depiction. It centrally contrasts with experiential accounts of depiction in that seeing something in a picture is understood as a visual experience of something present in the picture, rather than as a visual experience of something absent. The experience of a picture is in this respect akin to a veridical rather than hallucinatory perceptual experience on a perceptual account. Thus, the central selling-point of a perceptual account is that it allows taking at face (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. C. Abell (2005). McIntosh's Unrealistic Picture of Peacocke and Hopkins on Realistic Pictures. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):64-68.
    I defend Christopher Peacocke's and Robert Hopkins's experienced resemblance accounts of depiction against criticisms put forward by Gavin McIntosh in a recent article in this journal. I argue that, while there may be reasons for rejecting Peacocke's and Hopkins's accounts, McIntosh fails to provide any.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. C. Abell & K. Bantinaki (eds.) (2010). Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.
    This volume of specially written essays by leading philosophers offers to set the agenda for the philosophy of depiction.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4. Catharine Abell (2013). Expression in the Representational Arts. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):23-36.
    Understanding a work of representational art involves more than simply grasping what it represents. We can distinguish at least three types of content that representational works may possess. First, all representational works have explicit representational content. This includes the literal content of a linguistic work and the depictive content of a pictorial work. Second, they often have a conveyed content, which outstrips their explicit representational content, including much that is merely implicit in the work, and may exclude certain aspects of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Catharine Abell (2010). Cinema as a Representational Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):273-286.
    In this paper, I develop a unified account of cinematic representation as primary depiction. On this account, cinematic representation is a distinctive form of depiction, unique in its capacity to depict temporal properties. I then explore the consequences of this account for the much-contested question of whether cinema is an independent representational art form. I show that it is, and that Scruton’s argument to the contrary relies on an erroneous conception of cinematic representation. CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. Catharine Abell (2010). Of Photographs. In Catharine Abell Katerina Bantinaki (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. 81.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Catharine Abell (2010). The Epistemic Value of Photographs. In Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press
    There is a variety of epistemic roles to which photographs are better suited than non-photographic pictures. Photographs provide more compelling evidence of the existence of the scenes they depict than non-photographic pictures. They are also better sources of information about features of those scenes that are easily overlooked. This chapter examines several different attempts to explain the distinctive epistemic value of photographs, and argues that none is adequate. It then proposes an alternative explanation of their epistemic value. The chapter argues (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Catharine Abell (2009). Canny Resemblance. Philosophical Review 118 (2):183-223.
    Depiction is the form of representation distinctive of figurative paintings, drawings, and photographs. Accounts of depiction attempt to specify the relation something must bear to an object in order to depict it. Resemblance accounts hold that the notion of resemblance is necessary to the specification of this relation. Several difficulties with such analyses have led many philosophers to reject the possibility of an adequate resemblance account of depiction. This essay outlines these difficulties and argues that current resemblance accounts succumb to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  9. Catharine Abell (2007). Pictorial Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):1 – 17.
    I propose a number of criteria for the adequacy of an account of pictorial realism. Such an account must: explain the epistemic significance of realistic pictures; explain why accuracy and detail are salient to realism; be consistent with an accurate account of depiction; and explain the features of pictorial realism. I identify six features of pictorial realism. I then propose an account of realism as a measure of the information pictures provide about how their objects would look, were one to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10. Catharine Abell (2005). On Outlining the Shape of Depiction. Ratio 18 (1):27–38.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Catharine Abell (2005). Pictorial Implicature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):55–66.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1751