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  1. Tadeusz Batóg (1969). A Reduction in the Number of Primitive Concepts of Phonology. Studia Logica 25 (1):55 - 60.
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  2. Tadeusz Batóg (1962). A Contribution to Axiomatic Phonology. Studia Logica 13 (1):67 - 80.
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  3. Tadeusz Batóg (1961). Critical Remarks on Greenberg's Axiomatic Phonology. Studia Logica 12 (1):195 - 205.
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  4. A. J. Beattie (1954). Winfred P. Lehmann: Proto-Indo-European Phonology. Pp. Xv+129. Austin: University of Texas Press and Linguistic Society of America, 1952. Cloth, $4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):173-174.
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  5. John Coleman & John Local (1991). The “No Crossing Constraint” in Autosegmental Phonology. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (3):295 - 338.
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  6. A. Morpurgo Davies (1976). Attic Phonology Alan H. Sommerstein: The Sound Pattern of Ancient Greek. (Publications of the Philological Society, Xxiii.) Pp. Viii + 216. Oxford: Blackwell, 1973. Cloth, £4·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (01):87-88.
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  7. Giordana Grossi (1999). Which Phonology? Evidence for a Dissociation Between Articulatory and Auditory Phonology From Word-Form Deafness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):290-291.
    Pulvermüller's Hebbian model implies that an impairment in the word form system will affect phonological articulation and phonological comprehension, because there is only a single representation. Clinical evidence from patients with word-form deafness demonstrates a dissociation between input and output phonologies. These data suggest that auditory comprehension and articulatory production depend on discrete phonological representations localized in different cortical networks.
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  8. Charles Hulme & Margaret Snowling (1991). Deficits in Output Phonology Cause Developmental Phonological Dyslexia. Mind and Language 6 (2):130-134.
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  9. Paul Kiparsky, The Amphichronic Program Vs. Evolutionary Phonology.
    Evolutionary Phonology. Evolutionary Phonology seeks to derive typological generalizations from recurrent patterns of language change, themselves assumed to be rooted in perception, production, and acquisition. The goal is to eliminate UG by providing diachronic explanations for the cross-linguistic evidence that has been used to motivate it. (2) shows a schema of this program, where the arrows can be read as “explains” and/or “constrains”.
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  10. Lise Menn (1998). A Multi-Modal, Emergent View of the Development of Syllables in Early Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):523-524.
    A narrow focus on the jaw (or on motor generators) does not account for individual and language-specific differences in babbling and early speech. Furthermore, data from Yoshinaga-Itano's laboratory support earlier findings that show glottal rather than oral stops in deaf infants' babbling: audition is crucial for developing normal syllables.
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  11. Blake Myers-Schulz, Maia Pujara, Richard Wolf & Michael Koenigs (2013). Inherent Emotional Quality of Human Speech Sounds. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1105-1113.
  12. Lorenzo Peña, Phonology.
    Phonemes are minimal segments within the spoken message whose presence is relevant for distinguishing one message from a different one with another meaning. Each phoneme underlies different phonetic realizations. What sets a phoneme from another is fuzzy cluster of the fuzzy features. Thus the study of phonemic structures is likely to have much to gain from a gradualistic approach. Through a gradualistic treatment synchronic phonology could tally with the diachronic study in a simpler way than is customary. In this connection, (...)
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  13. H. W. Penney (1978). The Phonology and Morphology of Ancient Greek Helmut Rix: Historische Grammatik des Griechischen. Laut- Und Formenlehre. Pp. Xx + 297. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1976. Cloth, DM. 69 (for Members DM. 39.50). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):290-292.
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  14. Amanda Seidl (2001). Minimal Indirect Reference: A Theory of the Syntax-Phonology Interface. Routledge.
    This book investigates the nature of the relationship between phonology and syntax and proposes a theory of Minimal Indirect Reference that solves many classic problems relating to the topic. Seidl shows that all variation across languages in phonological domain size is due to syntactic differences and a single domain parameter specific to phonology.
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  15. Mark Sharlow, Phonetic Possibility and Modal Logic.
    In this paper I propose a formalization, using modal logic, of the notion of possibility that phoneticians use when they judge speech sounds to be possible or impossible. I argue that the most natural candidate for a modal logic of phonetic possibility is the modal system T.
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  16. Elena Simonato (2008). 'Social Phonology' in the Ussr in the 1920s. Studies in East European Thought 60 (4):339 - 347.
    In the 1920s and 1930s, some of the most talented linguists of the Soviet Union, among whom one can highlight N.F. Jakovlev and E.D. Polivanov, were involved in the process of “language building”. Their role in the success of this process is examined from the point of view of the phonological theory that they developed for creating scripts for the numerous peoples of the Soviet Union, Turkic and Caucasian above all. Jakovlev’s phonology, that Polivanov termed “social phonology”, was very different (...)
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  17. Alan H. Sommerstein (1979). Sven-Tage Teodorsson: The Phonology of Ptolemaic Koine. (Studia Graeca Et Latina Gothoburgensia, XXXVI.) Pp. 278. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 1977. Paper, Sw.Kr. 125. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):169-170.
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  18. Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (1998). Echo Phonology: Signs of a Link Between Gesture and Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-532.
    This commentary supports MacNeilage's dismissal of an evolutionary development from sign language to spoken language but presents evidence of a feature in sign language (echo phonology) that links iconic signs to abstract vocal syllables. These data provide an insight into possible mechanism by which iconic manual gestures accompanied by vocalisation could have provided a route for the evolution of spoken language with its characteristically arbitrary form–meaning relationship.
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