This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
45 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. Tadeusz Batóg (1969). A Reduction in the Number of Primitive Concepts of Phonology. Studia Logica 25 (1):55 - 60.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Tadeusz Batóg (1962). A Contribution to Axiomatic Phonology. Studia Logica 13 (1):67 - 80.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Tadeusz Batóg (1961). Critical Remarks on Greenberg's Axiomatic Phonology. Studia Logica 12 (1):195 - 205.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. A. J. Beattie (1954). Winfred P. Lehmann: Proto-Indo-European Phonology. Pp. Xv+129. Austin: University of Texas Press and Linguistic Society of America, 1952. Cloth, $4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):173-174.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Madeleine E. L. Beveridge & Thomas H. Bak (2012). Beyond One-Way Streets: The Interaction of Phonology, Morphology, and Culture with Orthography. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):280-281.
    Frost's claim that universal models of reading require linguistically diverse data is relevant and justified. We support it with evidence demonstrating the extent of the bias towards some Indo-European languages and alphabetic scripts in scientific literature. However, some of his examples are incorrect, and he neglects the complex interaction of writing system and language structure with history and cultural environment.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Steven Bird (1995). Computational Phonology a Constraint-Based Approach. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Robert Bjork (1994). A Grammar Of Old English, 1: Phonology. [REVIEW] Speculum 69 (3):800-802.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Reinhard Blutner (2002). Bruce Tesar and Paul Smolensky, Learnability in Optimality Theory. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (1):65-80.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Fernando Orphão de Carvalho (2009). On a Supposed Dogma of Speech Perception Research: A Response to Appelbaum (1999). Principia 13 (1):93-103.
    In this paper we purport to qualify the claim, advanced by Appelbaum (1999) that speech perception research, in the last 70 years or so, has endorsed a view on the nature of speech for which no evidence can be adduced and which has resisted falsification through active ad hoc “theoretical repair” carried by speech scientists. We show that the author’s qualms on the putative dogmatic status of speech research are utterly unwarranted, if not misconstrued as a whole. On more general (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. John Coleman (2006). Declarative Approaches to Phonology. In Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. 3--374.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. John Coleman & John Local (1991). The “No Crossing Constraint” in Autosegmental Phonology. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (3):295 - 338.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Carlos Conant (1915). Notes on the Phonology of the Palau Language. Journal of the American Oriental Society 35:1-15.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Carlos Conant (1913). Notes on the Phonology of the Tirurai Language. Journal of the American Oriental Society 33:150-157.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. A. Morpurgo Davies (1976). Attic Phonology Alan H. Sommerstein: The Sound Pattern of Ancient Greek. (Publications of the Philological Society, Xxiii.) Pp. Viii + 216. Oxford: Blackwell, 1973. Cloth, £4·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (01):87-88.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Diana Dimitrova, Gisela Redeker, Markus Egg & John Hoeks (2008). Linguistic and Extra-Linguistic Determinants of Accentuation in Dutch. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. B. Elan Dresher (2005). 5 Chomsky and Halle's Revolution in Phonology. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press 102.
  17. San Duanmu (2005). Chinese (Mandarin): Phonology. In Alex Barber (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier 2.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Marc Ettlinger & Jennifer A. Zapf (2008). Phonological Constraints on Children's Use of the Plural. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 41--45.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Edwin Fay (1920). Phonetic and Lexical Notes. Journal of the American Oriental Society 40:81-84.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Caroline Féry & Shinichiro Ishihara (eds.) (2016). The Oxford Handbook of Information Structure. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book provides linguists with a clear, critical, and comprehensive overview of theoretical and experimental work on information structure. Leading researchers survey the main theories of information structure in syntax, phonology, and semantics as well as perspectives from psycholinguistics and other relevant fields. Following the editors' introduction the book is divided into four parts. The first, on theories of and theoretical perspectives on information structure, includes chapters on topic, prosody, and implicature. Part 2 covers a range of current issues in (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Giordana Grossi (1999). Which Phonology? Evidence for a Dissociation Between Articulatory and Auditory Phonology From Word-Form Deafness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):290-291.
    Pulvermüller's Hebbian model implies that an impairment in the word form system will affect phonological articulation and phonological comprehension, because there is only a single representation. Clinical evidence from patients with word-form deafness demonstrates a dissociation between input and output phonologies. These data suggest that auditory comprehension and articulatory production depend on discrete phonological representations localized in different cortical networks.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Prahlad Gupta & David S. Touretzky (1994). Connectionist Models and Linguistic Theory: Investigations of Stress Systems in Language. Cognitive Science 18 (1):1-50.
  23. Michael Henderson (1975). Diglossia in Kabul Persian Phonology. Journal of the American Oriental Society 95 (4):651-654.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Charles Hulme & Margaret Snowling (1991). Deficits in Output Phonology Cause Developmental Phonological Dyslexia. Mind and Language 6 (2):130-134.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. O. C. Irwin & H. P. Chen (1946). Development of Speech During Infancy: Curve of Phonemic Types. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (5):431.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Jj Jenkins, E. Campbell & Js Pruitt (1989). Naive Phonology-Students Tacit Knowledge of Articulatory Linguistic Features. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):497-497.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Malone Jl (1976). Messrs Sampson, Chomsky and Halle, and Hebrew Phonology. Foundations of Language 14 (2):251-256.
  28. Peter W. Jusczyk (2003). Phonology and Phonetics, Acquisition Of. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group 3--645.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Paul Kiparsky, P ¯ Aninian Linguistics.
    It is the foundation of all traditional and modern analyses of Sanskrit, as well as having great historical and theoretical interest in its own right. Western grammatical theory has been influenced by it at every stage of its development for the last two centuries. The early 19th century comparativists learned from it the principles of morphological analysis. Bloomfield modeled both his classic Algonquian grammars and the logical-positivist axiomatization of his Postulates on it. Modern linguistics acknowledges it as the most complete (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Paul Kiparsky, The Amphichronic Program Vs. Evolutionary Phonology.
    Evolutionary Phonology. Evolutionary Phonology seeks to derive typological generalizations from recurrent patterns of language change, themselves assumed to be rooted in perception, production, and acquisition. The goal is to eliminate UG by providing diachronic explanations for the cross-linguistic evidence that has been used to motivate it. (2) shows a schema of this program, where the arrows can be read as “explains” and/or “constrains”.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Joseph L. Malone (1976). Messrs Sampson, Chomsky and Halle, and Hebrew Phonology. Foundations of Language 14 (2):251-256.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Effort and Displeasure in People Who Are Hard of Hearing. Ear and Hearing.
    Listening effort helps explain why people who are hard of hearing are prone to fatigue and social withdrawal. However, a one-factor model that cites only effort due to hardness of hearing is insufficient as there are many who lead happy lives despite their disability. This paper explores other contributory factors, in particular motivational arousal and pleasure. The theory of rational motivational arousal predicts that some people forego listening comprehension because they believe it to be impossible and hence worth no effort (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Lise Menn (1998). A Multi-Modal, Emergent View of the Development of Syllables in Early Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):523-524.
    A narrow focus on the jaw (or on motor generators) does not account for individual and language-specific differences in babbling and early speech. Furthermore, data from Yoshinaga-Itano's laboratory support earlier findings that show glottal rather than oral stops in deaf infants' babbling: audition is crucial for developing normal syllables.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Blake Myers-Schulz, Maia Pujara, Richard Wolf & Michael Koenigs (2013). Inherent Emotional Quality of Human Speech Sounds. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1105-1113.
    During much of the past century, it was widely believed that phonemes--the human speech sounds that constitute words--have no inherent semantic meaning, and that the relationship between a combination of phonemes (a word) and its referent is simply arbitrary. Although recent work has challenged this picture by revealing psychological associations between certain phonemes and particular semantic contents, the precise mechanisms underlying these associations have not been fully elucidated. Here we provide novel evidence that certain phonemes have an inherent, non-arbitrary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Andrew Nevins (2009). On Formal Universals in Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):461-462.
    Understanding the universal aspects of human language structure requires comparison at multiple levels of analysis. While Evans & Levinson (E&L) focus mostly on substantive variation in language, equally revealing insights can come from studying formal universals. I first discuss how Artificial Grammar Experiments can test universal preferences for certain types of abstract phonological generalizations over others. I then discuss moraic onsets in the language Arrernte, and how its apparent substantive variation ultimately rests on a formal universal regarding syllable-weight sensitivity.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Lorenzo Peña, Phonology.
    Phonemes are minimal segments within the spoken message whose presence is relevant for distinguishing one message from a different one with another meaning. Each phoneme underlies different phonetic realizations. What sets a phoneme from another is fuzzy cluster of the fuzzy features. Thus the study of phonemic structures is likely to have much to gain from a gradualistic approach. Through a gradualistic treatment synchronic phonology could tally with the diachronic study in a simpler way than is customary. In this connection, (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. H. W. Penney (1978). The Phonology and Morphology of Ancient Greek Helmut Rix: Historische Grammatik des Griechischen. Laut- Und Formenlehre. Pp. Xx + 297. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1976. Cloth, DM. 69 (for Members DM. 39.50). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):290-292.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Gillian Ramchand & Charles Reiss (eds.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Interfaces. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This state-of-the-art guide to some of the most exciting work in current linguistics explores how the core components of the language faculty interact. It examines how these interactions are reflected in linguistic and cognitive theory, considers what they reveal about the operations of language within the mind, and looks at their reflections in expression and communication. Leading international scholars present cutting-edge accounts of developments in the interfaces between phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. They bring to bear a rich (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Amanda Seidl (2001). Minimal Indirect Reference: A Theory of the Syntax-Phonology Interface. Routledge.
    This book investigates the nature of the relationship between phonology and syntax and proposes a theory of Minimal Indirect Reference that solves many classic problems relating to the topic. Seidl shows that all variation across languages in phonological domain size is due to syntactic differences and a single domain parameter specific to phonology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Elisabeth O. Selkirk & Jean-Roger Vergnaud (1973). How Abstract is French Phonology? Foundations of Language 10 (2):249-254.
  41. Mark Sharlow, Phonetic Possibility and Modal Logic.
    In this paper I propose a formalization, using modal logic, of the notion of possibility that phoneticians use when they judge speech sounds to be possible or impossible. I argue that the most natural candidate for a modal logic of phonetic possibility is the modal system T.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Elena Simonato (2008). 'Social Phonology' in the Ussr in the 1920s. Studies in East European Thought 60 (4):339 - 347.
    In the 1920s and 1930s, some of the most talented linguists of the Soviet Union, among whom one can highlight N.F. Jakovlev and E.D. Polivanov, were involved in the process of “language building”. Their role in the success of this process is examined from the point of view of the phonological theory that they developed for creating scripts for the numerous peoples of the Soviet Union, Turkic and Caucasian above all. Jakovlev’s phonology, that Polivanov termed “social phonology”, was very different (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Alan H. Sommerstein (1979). Sven-Tage Teodorsson: The Phonology of Ptolemaic Koine. (Studia Graeca Et Latina Gothoburgensia, XXXVI.) Pp. 278. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 1977. Paper, Sw.Kr. 125. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):169-170.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Bert Vaux & Andrew Nevins (eds.) (2008). Rules, Constraints, and Phonological Phenomena. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume of new work by prominent phonologists goes to the heart of current debates in phonological and linguistic theory: should the explanation of phonological variety be constraint or rule-based and, in the light of the resolution of this question, how in the mind does phonology interface with other components of the grammar. The book includes contributions from leading proponents of both sides of the argument and an extensive introduction setting out the history, nature, and more general linguistic implications of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (1998). Echo Phonology: Signs of a Link Between Gesture and Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-532.
    This commentary supports MacNeilage's dismissal of an evolutionary development from sign language to spoken language but presents evidence of a feature in sign language (echo phonology) that links iconic signs to abstract vocal syllables. These data provide an insight into possible mechanism by which iconic manual gestures accompanied by vocalisation could have provided a route for the evolution of spoken language with its characteristically arbitrary form–meaning relationship.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography