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Introductions Stoljar 2010: Physicalism
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  1. Harald Atmanspacher, Loriliai Biernacki, Bernard Carr, Wolfgang Fach, Michael Grosso, Michael Murphy, David E. Presti, Gregory Shaw, Henry P. Stapp, Eric M. Weiss & Ian Whicher (2015). Beyond Physicalism: Toward Reconciliation of Science and Spirituality. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  2. A. J. Ayer (ed.) (1978). Logical Positivism. Greenwood Press.
    Edited by a leading exponent of the school, this book offers--in the words of the movement's founders--logical positivism's revolutionary theories on meaning and metaphysics, the nature of logic and mathematics, the foundations of knowledge ...
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  3. Lynne Rudder Baker (1991). [Book Review] Saving Belief, a Critique of Physicalism. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (4):27-40.
  4. George Bealer (2009). The Self-Consciousness Argument : Functionalism and the Corruption of Intentional Content. In Robert C. Koons & George Bealer (eds.), The Waning of Materialism: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Niels Bohr (1957). Physical Science and Man's Position. Philosophy Today 1 (1):65-69.
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  6. Bill Brewer (1995). Compulsion by Reason (Mental Causation II). Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 69:237-53.
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  7. Robin Brown & James Ladyman (2009). Physicalism, Supervenience and the Fundamental Level. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (234):20-38.
    We provide a formulation of physicalism, and show that this is to be favoured over alternative formulations. Much of the literature on physicalism assumes without argument that there is a fundamental level to reality, and we show that a consideration of the levels problem and its implications for physicalism tells in favour of the form of physicalism proposed here. Its hey elements are, fast, that the empirical and substantive part of physicalism amounts to a prediction that physics will not posit (...)
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  8. R. Philip Buckley (2001). Physicalism and the Problem of Mental Causation. Journal of Philosophical Research 26 (January):155-174.
    In this paper I argue that the problem of mental causation can be solved by distinguishing between classificatory mental properties, like being a pain, and instances of those properties.Antireductive physicalism allows only that the former be irreducibly mental. Consequently, properties like being a pain cannot have causal commerce with the physical without violating causal closure. But instances of painfulness, according to the token identity thesis, are identical with various physical tokens and can therefore have causal efficacy in the physical world. (...)
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  9. Tim Crane (2010). Cosmic Hermeneutics Vs. Emergence: The Challenge of the Explanatory Gap. In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Emergence in Mind. Oup Oxford.
    This paper is a defence of Terence Horgan’s claim that any genuinely physicalist position must distinguish itself from emergentism. I argue that physicalism is necessarily reductive in character -- it must either give a reductive account of apparently non-physical entities, or a reductive explanation of why there are non-physical entities. I argue that many recent ‘nonreductive’ physicalists do not do this, and that because of this they cannot adequately distinguish their view from emergentism. The conclusion is that this is the (...)
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  10. Tim Crane (2000). The Origins of Qualia. In Tim Crane & Sarah A. Patterson (eds.), The History of the Mind-Body Problem. Routledge.
    The mind-body problem in contemporary philosophy has two parts: the problem of mental causation and the problem of consciousness. These two parts are not unrelated; in fact, it can be helpful to see them as two horns of a dilemma. On the one hand, the causal interaction between mental and physical phenomena seems to require that all causally efficacious mental phenomena are physical; but on the other hand, the phenomenon of consciousness seems to entail that not all mental phenomena are (...)
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  11. Chris Daly & David Liggins (2010). Do Object-Dependent Properties Threaten Physicalism? Journal of Philosophy 107 (11):610-614.
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  12. Crawford L. Elder (1999). Physicalism and the Fallacy of Composition. Philosophical Quarterly 49 (200):332-43.
    A mutation alters the hemoglobin in some members of a species of antelope, and as a result the members fare better at high altitudes than their conspecifics do; so high-altitude foraging areas become open to them that are closed to their conspecifics; they thrive, reproduce at a greater rate, and the gene for altered hemoglobin spreads further through the gene pool of the species. That sounds like a classic example (owed to Karen Neander, 1995) of a causal chain traced by (...)
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  13. Colin Farrelly (2005). Historical Materialism and Supervenience. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):420-446.
    In this article I put forth a new interpretation of historical materialism titled the supervenient interpretation . Drawing on the insights of analytical Marxism and utilizing the concept of supervenience, I advance two central claims. First, that Marx's synchronic materialism maintains that the superstructure supervenes naturally on the economic structure. Second, that diachronic materialism maintains that the relations of production supervene naturally on the forces of production. Taken together, these two theses help bring to the fore the central tenets of (...)
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  14. James Kern Feibleman (1970). The New Materialism. The Hague,Nijhoff.
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  15. Frederick Ferré (1977). Language, Logic, and God. Greenwood Press.
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  16. Frederick Ferré (1961/1981). Language, Logic, & God. University of Chicago Press.
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  17. Jeffrey E. Foss (1988). The Percept and Vector Function Theories of the Brain. Philosophy of Science 55 (December):511-537.
    Physicalism is an empirical theory of the mind and its place in nature. So the physicalist must show that current neuroscience does not falsify physicalism, but instead supports it. Current neuroscience shows that a nervous system is what I call a vector function system. I provide a brief outline of the resources that empirical research has made available within the constraints of the vector function approach. Then I argue that these resources are sufficient, indeed apt, for the physicalist enterprise, by (...)
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  18. Oswald Hanfling (1981). Logical Positivism. Columbia University Press.
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  19. Wayne I. Henry (1994). David Charles and Kathleen Lennon, Eds., Reduction, Explanation, and Realism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (2):79-82.
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  20. Jakob Hohwy (2005). Explanation and Two Conceptions of the Physical. Erkenntnis 62 (1):71-89.
    Any position that promises genuine progress on the mind-body problem deserves attention. Recently, Daniel Stoljar has identified a physicalist version of Russells notion of neutral monism; he elegantly argues that with this type of physicalism it is possible to disambiguate on the notion of physicalism in such a way that the problem is resolved. The further issue then arises of whether we have reason to believe that this type of physicalism is in fact true. Ultimately, one needs to argue for (...)
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  21. Terry Horgan (2002). Replies to Papers. Grazer Philosophische Studien 63 (1):302-340.
    Jaegwon Kim argues that one should distinguish naturalism from materialism, and that both should be construed as ontological rather than epistemological. I agree, on both counts. Although I have sometimes tended to slur together materialism and naturalism in of my writings (as is done in much recent philosophy), I do think that it is important to distinguish them. It is a serious philosophical task to get clearer about how each position is best articulated, and about ways that one could embrace (...)
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  22. Hubertus Gezinus Hubbeling (1971). Language, Logic and Criterion. Amsterdam,Born N.V..
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  23. Andrew Jack (1994). Materialism and Supervenience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (4):426-444.
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  24. Jørgen Jørgensen (1951/1970). The Development of Logical Empiricism. New York,Johnson Reprint Corp..
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  25. H. P. K. (1969). Completeness in Science. Review of Metaphysics 22 (4):765-765.
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  26. Jaegwon Kim (2000). How Can My Mind Move My Limbs? Mental Causation From Descartes to Contemporary Physicalism. Philosophic Exchange 30:5-16.
  27. Jaegwon Kim (1999). Physicalism and Panexperientialism: Response to David Ray Griffin. Process Studies 28 (1-2):28-34.
  28. Daniel King (2005). Towards a Physical Theory of the Now. Logique Et Analyse 48 (192):261-277.
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  29. Daniel Lim (2014). Occasionalism and Non-Reductive Physicalism: Another Look at the Continuous Creation Argument. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (1):39-57.
    Malebranche’s so-called conservation is continuous creation (CCC) argument has been celebrated as a powerful and persuasive argument for Occasionalism—the claim that only God has and exercises causal powers. In this paper I want to examine the CCC argument for Occasionalism by comparing it to Jaegwon Kim’s so-called Supervenience argument against non-reductive physicalism. Because the arguments have deep similarities it is interesting and fruitful to consider them in tandem. First I argue that both the CCC argument and the Supervenience argument turn (...)
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  30. Pete Mandik, Fine-Grained Supervenience, Cognitive Neuroscience, and the Future of Functionalism.
    The majority of contemporary philosophers of mind are physicalists. The majority of physicalists, however, are non-reductive physicalists. As nonreductive physicalists, these philosophers hold that a system's mental properties are different from a system's physical properties, that is, they hold that the sum total of mental facts about some system is a different set of facts than the sum total of physical facts about the same system. As physicalists, however, these nonreductivists hold that mental facts are nonetheless determined by physical facts, (...)
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  31. Pete Mandik (2011). Supervenience and Neuroscience. Synthese 180 (3):443 - 463.
    The philosophical technical term "supervenience" is frequently used in the philosophy of mind as a concise way of characterizing the core idea of physicalism in a manner that is neutral with respect to debates between reductive physicalists and nonreductive physicalists. I argue against this alleged neutrality and side with reductive physicalists. I am especially interested here in debates between psychoneural reductionists and nonreductive functionalist physicalists. Central to my arguments will be considerations concerning how best to articulate the spirit of the (...)
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  32. Eric Marcus (2001). Mental Causation: Unnaturalized but Not Unnatural. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):57-83.
    If a woman in the audience at a presentation raises her hand, we would take this as evidence that she intends to ask a question. In normal circumstances, we would be right to say that she raises her hand because she intends to ask a question. We also expect that there could, in principle, be a causal explanation of her hand’s rising in purely physiological terms. Ordinarily, we take the existence and compatibility of both kinds of causes for granted. But (...)
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  33. D. H. Mellor (1993). Supervenience? No Chance! Reply to Menuge. Analysis 53 (4):236-239.
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  34. Paweł Michałowski (2012). Przez filozofię do świadomego umysłu [David Chalmers, Świadomy umysł]. Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia.
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  35. Martin Montminy (2005). Holisme, Référence Et Irréductibilité du Mental. Dialogue 44 (3):419-437.
    J’examine en détail l’argument vaguement suggéré par Davidson selon lequel le holisme entraînerait l’irreductibilité du mental. Je défends cet argument contre deux objections souvent faites contre des arguments visant à dériver des thèses métaphysiques à partir de prémisses portant sur nos critères ordinaires d’application de nos termes. J’invoque la sémantique bidimensionnelle pour expliquer les liensentre ces critères et les questions touchant la référence et la réduction. Je montre comment l’irréductibilité du mental dérive du caractère holiste et flexible des critères d’attribution (...)
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  36. Adam Morton (1985). Review of Armstrong & Malcolm *Consciousness and Causality*. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (3).
    review of David Armstrong and Norman Malcolm *Consciousness and Causality*. Two dramatically opposed positions, each plausible only when contrasted with the other.
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  37. Paul K. Moser (1992). Physicalism and Global Supervenience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):71-82.
    This paper examines a nonreductive supervenience relation central to a philosophically popular version of nonreductive physicalism inspired by Donald Davidson. The paper argues that this global supervenience relation faces a serious epistemological problem that blocks its being superior to weaker, less general supervenience relations.
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  38. Arthur Pap (2006). The Limits of Logical Empiricism: Selected Papers of Arthur Pap. Springer.
    Arthur Pap’s work played an important role in the development of the analytic tradition. This role goes beyond the merely historical fact that Pap’s views of dispositional and modal concepts were influential. As a sympathetic critic of logical empiricism, Pap, like Quine, saw a deep tension in logical empiricism at its very best in the work of Carnap. But Pap’s critique of Carnap is quite different from Quine’s, and represents the discovery of limits beyond which empiricism cannot go, where there (...)
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  39. David Papineau (1995). Arguments for Supervenience and Physical Realization. In Elias E. Savellos & U. Yalcin (eds.), Supervenience: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
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  40. DeWitt H. Parker (1944). Some Comments on "Reformed Materialism and Intrinsic Endurance". Philosophical Review 53 (4):383-391.
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  41. John T. Roberts (2011). Extra-Physical Structure in a Physical World? Or, Is the Study of Life Provincial? The Monist 94 (2):221-243.
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  42. Alexander Rueger (2000). Robust Supervenience and Emergence. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):466-491.
    Non-reductive physicalists have made a number of attempts to provide the relation of supervenience between levels of properties with enough bite to analyze interesting cases without at the same time losing the relation's acceptability for the physicalist. I criticize some of these proposals and suggest an alternative supplementation of the supervenience relation by imposing a requirement of robustness which is motivated by the notion of structural stability familiar from dynamical systems theory. Robust supervenience, I argue, captures what the non-reductive physicalist (...)
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  43. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). Decline and Obsolescence of Logical Empiricism: Carnap Vs. Quine and the Critics. Garland Pub..
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional philosophy (...)
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  44. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). The Emergence of Logical Empiricism: From 1900 to the Vienna Circle. Garland Publishing.
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional philosophy (...)
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  45. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). The Legacy of the Vienna Circle: Modern Reappraisals. Garland Pub..
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional philosophy (...)
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  46. Moritz Schlick, Rudolf Carnap, Otto Neurath & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.) (1996). Logical Empiricism at its Peak: Schlick, Carnap, and Neurath. Garland Pub..
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional philosophy (...)
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  47. Henry Stapp (2005). Quantum Theory of the Human Person. In Avshalom C. Elitzur, Shahar Dolev & Nancy Kolenda (eds.), Quo Vadis Quantum Mechanics? Springer. 397-404.
  48. Henry P. Stapp, Tutorial in Quantum Mechanics and the Mind-Brain Connection.
    I have written extensively of the topic of this tutorial. But in order to reach a broad audience I have in many of my more recent works refrained from using equations. That approach makes those works accessible in principle both to readers who are repelled by equations, and also to quantum physicists who are sufficiently familiar with the details of the quantum theory of measurement to be able to fill in for themselves the omitted equations. However, that approach means also (...)
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  49. Henry P. Stapp (1985). Consciousness and Values in the Quantum Universe. Foundations of Physics 15 (1):35-47.
    Application of quantum mechanical description to neurophysiological processes appears to provide for a natural unification of the physical and humanistic sciences. The categories of thought used to represent physical and psychical processes become united, and the mechanical conception of man created by classical physics is replaced by a profoundly different quantum conception. This revised image of man allows human values to be rooted in contemporary science.
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  50. Ann Thomson (2008). Bodies of Thought: Science, Religion, and the Soul in the Early Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.
    'The church in danger' : latitudinarians, Socinians, and Hobbists -- Animal spirits and living fibres -- Mortalists and materialists -- Journalism, exile, and clandestinity -- Mid-eighteenth-century materialism -- Epilogue : some consequences.
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