Bookmark and Share

Physics of Time

Edited by Virendra Tripathi (University of Nebraska, Lincoln, University of Nebraska, Omaha)
Related categories
Siblings:
235 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 235
  1. A. Agodi & M. A. Cassarino (1982). Time Ordering and the Lorentz Group. Foundations of Physics 12 (2):137-152.
    A simplified definition of point local clocks and the relationship between an inertial reference frame and a class of such clocks, at rest with respect to each other, are used for an algebraic determination of the geometry of Minkowski's space-time on the set of point events. The group of all automorphisms that preserve the time ordering induced by the set of all equivalent local clocks is shown to be generated by the inhomogeneous orthochronous Lorentz group and dilatations, consistently with a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Horst Aichmann & Günter Nimtz (2014). On the Traversal Time of Barriers. Foundations of Physics 44 (6):678-688.
    Fifty years ago Hartman studied the barrier transmission time of wave packets (J Appl Phys 33:3427–3433, 1962). He was inspired by the tunneling experiments across thin insulating layers at that time. For opaque barriers he calculated faster than light propagation and a transmission time independent of barrier length, which is called the Hartman effect. A faster than light (FTL or superluminal) wave packet velocity was deduced in analog tunneling experiments with microwaves and with infrared light thirty years later. Recently, the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. J. Anandan (1999). Are There Dynamical Laws? Foundations of Physics 29 (11):1647-1672.
    The nature of a physical law is examined, and it is suggested that there may not be any fundamental dynamical laws. This explains the intrinsic indeterminism of quantum theory. The probabilities for transition from a given initial state to a final state then depends on the quantum geometry that is determined by symmetries, which may exist as relations between states in the absence of dynamical laws. This enables the experimentally well-confirmed quantum probabilities to be derived from the geometry of Hilbert (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Henryk Arodź & Maria Massalska-Arodź (2008). Physics of Time. Dialogue and Universalism 18 (9-10):55-69.
    Our article is an overview of a selection of findings in physics relating to the issue of time—we do not present in it any “time theory” of our own. After making some general remarks on the issue of time, we present historical outline and a brief description of the current state of time interval measurements. Subsequently, we go on to discuss certain (relating to the concept of time) consequences of both theories of relativity: special and general. Here, time is a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard T. W. Arthur, Time Lapse and the Degeneracy of Time: Gödel, Proper Time and Becoming in Relativity Theory.
    In the transition to Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity (SR), certain concepts that had previously been thought to be univocal or absolute properties of systems turn out not to be. For instance, mass bifurcates into (i) the relativistically invariant proper mass m0, and (ii) the mass relative to an inertial frame in which it is moving at a speed v = βc, its relative mass m, whose quantity is a factor γ = (1 – β2) -1/2 times the proper mass, (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard T. W. Arthur, Time, Inertia and the Relativity Principle.
    In this paper I try to sort out a tangle of issues regarding time, inertia, proper time and the so-called “clock hypothesis” raised by Harvey Brown's discussion of them in his recent book, Physical Relativity. I attempt to clarify the connection between time and inertia, as well as the deficiencies in Newton's “derivation” of Corollary 5, by giving a group theoretic treatment original with J.-P. Provost. This shows how both the Galilei and Lorentz transformations may be derived from the relativity (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lynne Rudder Baker (1974). Temporal Becoming: The Argument From Physics. Philosophical Forum 6:218-236.
    Arguments about temporal becoming often get nowhere. One reason for the impasse lies in the fact that the issue has been formulated as a choice between science on the one hand and common sense (or ordinary language) on the other as the primary source of ontological commitment.' Often' proponents of attributing temporal becoming to the physical universe look to everyday temporal concepts, find them infested with notions involving temporal becoming and conclude that becoming is a basic feature of the physical (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Yuri Balashov, Enduring and Perduring Objects in Minkowski.
    I examine the issue of persistence over time in the context of the special theory of relativity (SR). The four-dimensional ontology of perduring objects is clearly favored by SR. But it is a different question if and to what extent this ontology is required, and the rival endurantist ontology ruled out, by this theory. In addressing this question, I take the essential idea of endurantism, that objects are wholly present at single moments of time, and argue that it commits one (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Julian Barbour (1999). The End of Time: The Next Revolution in Physics. Weidenfeld and Nicholson.
    In a revolutionary new book, a theoretical physicist attacks the foundations of modern scientific theory, including the notion of time, as he shares evidence of ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Adrian Bardon (ed.) (2011). The Future of the Philosophy of Time. Routledge.

    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of time. This volume features original essays by the foremost philosophers of time discussing the goals and methodology of the philosophy of time, and examining the best way to move forward with regard to the field's core issues.

    The collection is unique in combining cutting edge work on time with a focus on the big picture of time studies as a discipline. The major questions asked include:

    • What are (...)
    • Is the passage of time real, or just a subjective phenomenon?
    • Are the past and future real, or is the present all that exists?
    • If the future is real and unchanging (as contemporary physics seems to suggest), how is free will possible?
    • Since only the present moment is perceived, how does the experience as we know it come about? How does experience take on its character of a continuous flow of moments or events?
    • What explains the apparent one-way direction of time?
    • Is time travel a logical/metaphysical possibility?
    . (shrink)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Sam Baron, Peter Evans & Kristie Miller (2010). From Timeless Physical Theory to Timelessness. Humana.Mente 13:35-59.
    This paper addresses the extent to which both Julian Barbour‘s Machian formulation of general relativity and his interpretation of canonical quantum gravity can be called timeless. We differentiate two types of timelessness in Barbour‘s (1994a, 1994b and 1999c). We argue that Barbour‘s metaphysical contention that ours is a timeless world is crucially lacking an account of the essential features of time—an account of what features our world would need to have if it were to count as being one in which (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. B. Baumgartner (1994). Postulates for Time Evolution in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 24 (6):855-872.
    A detailed list of postulates is formulated in an algebraic setting. These postulates are sufficient to entail the standard time evolution governed by the Schrödinger or Dirac equation. They are also necessary in a strong sense: Dropping any one of the postulates allows for other types of time evolution, as is demonstrated with examples. Some philosophical remarks hint on possible further investigations.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Bell, Time and Causation in Gödel's Universe.
    In 1949 the great logician Kurt Gödel constructed the first mathematical models of the universe in which travel into the past is, in theory at least, possible. Within the framework of Einstein’s general theory of relativity Gödel produced cosmological solutions to Einstein’s field equations which contain closed time-like curves, that is, curves in spacetime which, despite being closed, still represent possible paths of bodies. An object moving along such a path would travel back into its own past, to the very (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Nuel Belnap, From Newtonian Determinism to Branching-Space-Time Indeterminism.
    Logik, Begriffe, Prinzipien des Handelns (Logic, Concepts, Principles of Action). Thomas Müller/ Albert Newen (eds.), mentis Verlag GmbII, 2007, pp. 13–31.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Nuel Belnap (1992). Branching Space-Time. Synthese 92 (3):385 - 434.
    Branching space-time is a simple blend of relativity and indeterminism. Postulates and definitions rigorously describe the causal order relation between possible point events. The key postulate is a version of everything has a causal origin; key defined terms include history and choice point. Some elementary but helpful facts are proved. Application is made to the status of causal contemporaries of indeterministic events, to how splitting of histories happens, to indeterminism without choice, and to Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen distant correlations.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Gordon Belot (2007). The Representation of Time and Change in Mechanics. In John Earman & Jeremy Butterfield (eds.), Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier. 133--227.
    This chapter is concerned with the representation of time and change in classical (i.e., non-quantum) physical theories. One of the main goals of the chapter is to attempt to clarify the nature and scope of the so-called problem of time: a knot of technical and interpretative problems that appear to stand in the way of attempts to quantize general relativity, and which have their roots in the general covariance of that theory. The most natural approach to these questions is via (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hanoch Ben-Yami (forthcoming). Causal Order, Temporal Order, and Becoming in Special Relativity. Topoi:1-5.
    I reconstruct from Rietdijk and Putnam’s well-known papers an argument against the applicability of the concept of becoming in Special Relativity, which I think is unaffected by some of the objections found in the literature. I then consider a line of thought found in the discussion of the possible conventionality of simultaneity in Special Relativity, beginning with Reichenbach, and apply it to the debate over becoming. We see that it immediately renders Rietdijk and Putnam’s argument unsound. I end by comparing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. George Berger (1972). Temporally Symmetric Causal Relations in Minkowski Space-Time. Synthese 24 (1-2):58 - 73.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Craig Bourne (2004). Becoming Inflated. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):107-119.
    Some have thought that the process of the expansion of the universe can be used to define an absolute ‘cosmic time’ which then serves as the absolute time required by tensed theories of time. Indeed, this is the very reason why many tense theorists are happy to concede that special relativity is incompatible with the tense thesis, because they think that general relativity, which trumps special relativity, and on which modern cosmology rests, supplies the means of defining temporal becoming using (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dennis E. Boyle (1998). Far Away Now: Time and Distance Revisited. Metaphilosophy 29 (4):306-312.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael Bradie (1985). Recent Developments in the Physics of Time and General Cosmology. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (4):371-395.
  22. Jeremy Butterfield, Against Pointillisme: A Call to Arms.
    This paper forms part of a wider campaign: to deny pointillisme. That is the doctrine that a physical theory's fundamental quantities are defined at points of space or of spacetime, and represent intrinsic properties of such points or point-sized objects located there; so that properties of spatial or spatiotemporal regions and their material contents are determined by the point-by-point facts. Elsewhere, I argued against pointillisme about chrono-geometry, and about velocity in classical mechanics. In both cases, attention focussed on temporal extrinsicality: (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jeremy Butterfield (ed.) (1999). The Arguments of Time. Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press.
    These nine essays address fundamental questions about time in philosophy, physics, linguistics, and psychology. Are there facts about the future? Could we affect the past? In physics, general relativity and quantum theory give contradictory treatments of time. So in the current search for a theory of quantum gravity, which should give way: general relativity or quantum theory? In linguistics and psychology, how does our language represent time, and how do our minds keep track of it?
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jeremy Butterfield (1989). The Hole Truth. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):1-28.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael Byrd (1978). Megarian Necessity in Forward-Branching, Backward-Linear Time. Noûs 12 (4):463-469.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Mary Whiton Calkins (1899). Time as Related to Causality and to Space. Mind 8 (30):216-232.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Craig Callender, Time in Physics.
    No one conception of time emerges from a study of physics. As science changes—over time or through varying interpretations at a time—our conception of physical time changes. Each of these changes and resulting theories of time has been the subject of philosophical scrutiny, so there are many philosophical controversies internal to particular physical theories. For instance, the move to special relativity radically transformed our understanding of time, but it also gave rise to debates about the nature of simultaneity within the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Craig Callender, What Makes Time Special.
    What is the difference between time and space? This question, once a central one in metaphysics, has not been treated kindly by recent history. By joining together space and time into spacetime Minkowski sapped some of the spirit out of this project. That is unfortunate, however, for even in relativistic theories there remain sharp and important metrical and topological distinctions between the timelike and spacelike directions of spacetime. Questions about what these differences are, why they exist and how they are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Craig Callender (ed.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive book on the philosophy of time. Leading philosophers discuss the metaphysics of time, our experience and representation of time, the role of time in ethics and action, and philosophical issues in the sciences of time, especially quantum mechanics and relativity theory.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Craig Callender (2008). The Common Now. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):339-361.
    The manifest image is teeming with activity. Objects are booming and buzzing by, changing their locations and properties, vivid perceptions are replaced, and we seem to be inexorably slipping into the future. Time—or at least our experience in time— seems a very turbulent sort of thing. By contrast, time in the scientist image seems very still. The fundamental laws of physics don’t differentiate between past and future, nor do they pick out a present moment that flows. Except for a minus (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Craig Callender, The Past Hypothesis Meets Gravity.
    The Past Hypothesis is the claim that the Boltzmann entropy of the universe was extremely low when the universe began. Can we make sense of this claim when *classical* gravitation is included in the system? I first show that the standard rationale for not worrying about gravity is too quick. If the paper does nothing else, my hope is that it gets the problems induced by gravity the attention they deserve in the foundations of physics. I then try to make (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Craig Callender & Robert Weingard (1994). The Bohmian Model of Quantum Cosmology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:218 - 227.
    A realist causal model of quantum cosmology (QC) is developed. By applying the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics to QC, we resolve the notorious 'problem of time' in QC, and derive exact equations of motion for cosmological dynamical variables. Due to this success, it is argued that if the situation in QC is used as a yardstick by which other interpretations are measured, the de Broglie-Bohm theory seems uniquely fit as an interpretation of quantum mechanics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Milic Capek (1960). The Theory of Eternal Recurrence in Modern Philosophy of Science, with Special Reference to C. S. Peirce. Journal of Philosophy 57 (9):289-296.
    The cyclical theory f time, which is better known under the name of the 'theory of eternal recurrence,' is usually associated with certain ancient thinkers--in particular, Pythagoreans and Stoics. The most famous among those who have tried to revive the theory in the modern era is unquestionably Friedrich Nietzsche. It is less well known that the theory was defended also by C.S. Peirce and, as late as 1927, by the French historian of science, Abel Rey. The contemporary discussion of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mario Castagnino, Olimpia Lombardi & Luis Lara (2003). The Global Arrow of Time as a Geometrical Property of the Universe. Foundations of Physics 33 (6):877-912.
    Traditional discussions about the arrow of time in general involve the concept of entropy. In the cosmological context, the direction past-to-future is usually related to the direction of the gradient of the entropy function of the universe. But the definition of the entropy of the universe is a very controversial matter. Moreover, thermodynamics is a phenomenological theory. Geometrical properties of space-time provide a more fundamental and less controversial way of defining an arrow of time for the universe as a whole. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Mario Castagnino, Olimpia Lombardi & Luis Lara, The Arrow of Time in Cosmology.
    Scientific cosmology is an empirical discipline whose objects of study are the large-scale properties of the universe. In this context, it is usual to call the direction of the expansion of the universe the "cosmological arrow of time". However, there is no reason for privileging the ‘radius’ of the universe for defining the arrow of time over other geometrical properties of the space-time. Traditional discussions about the arrow of time in general involve the concept of entropy. In the cosmological context, (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. P. Catillon, N. Cue, M. J. Gaillard, R. Genre, M. Gouanère, R. G. Kirsch, J.-C. Poizat, J. Remillieux, L. Roussel & M. Spighel (2008). A Search for the de Broglie Particle Internal Clock by Means of Electron Channeling. Foundations of Physics 38 (7):659-664.
    The particle internal clock conjectured by de Broglie in 1924 was investigated in a channeling experiment using a beam of ∼80 MeV electrons aligned along the 〈110〉 direction of a 1 μm thick silicon crystal. Some of the electrons undergo a rosette motion, in which they interact with a single atomic row. When the electron energy is finely varied, the rate of electron transmission at 0° shows a 8% dip within 0.5% of the resonance energy, 80.874 MeV, for which the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Peter Caws (1965). On Being in the Same Place at the Same Time. American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (1):63 - 66.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. C. T. K. Chari (1949). On Representations of Time as "the Fourth Dimension" and Their Metaphysical Inadequacy. Mind 58 (230):218-221.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Peter D. B. Collins & Euan J. Squires (1993). Time in a Quantum Universe. Foundations of Physics 23 (6):913-921.
    The relevance of observations in introducing time dependence into quantum cosmology is discussed, some of the important features being illustrated by a simple example. Although the concept of time arises in a natural way even with a constant wave function, there are some conceptual difficulties in understanding how arguments which are familiar in classical cosmology translate to the quantum case.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. F. I. Cooperstock & S. Tieu (2005). Closed Timelike Curves and Time Travel: Dispelling the Myth. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (9):1497-1509.
    Gödel’s contention that closed timelike curves (CTC’s) are a necessary consequence of the Einstein equations for his metric is challenged. It is seen that the imposition of periodicity in a timelike coordinate is the actual source of CTC’s rather than the physics of general relativity. This conclusion is supported by the creation of Gödel-like CTC’s in flat space by the correct choice of coordinate system and identifications. Thus, the indications are that the notion of a time machine remains exclusively an (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Newton C. A. Costdaa, Otávio Bueno & Steven French (1997). Suppes Predicates for Space-Time. Synthese 112 (2):271-279.
    We formulate Suppes predicates for various kinds of space-time: classical Euclidean, Minkowski's, and that of General Relativity. Starting with topological properties, these continua are mathematically constructed with the help of a basic algebra of events; this algebra constitutes a kind of mereology, in the sense of Lesniewski. There are several alternative, possible constructions, depending, for instance, on the use of the common field of reals or of a non-Archimedian field (with infinitesimals). Our approach was inspired by the work of (...) (1919), though our philosophical stance is completely different from his. The structures obtained are idealized constructs underlying extant, physical space-time. (shrink)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John Cramer, Back in Time Through Other Dimensions.
    The physics behind the limerick is that within Einstein’s special theory of relativity there is a subtle connection between faster-than-light and backwards-in-time travel. If you could do one, then in principle you could also do the other. But relativity is carefully contrived to prevent superluminal and back-in-time travel and communication.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John G. Cramer, More About Wormholes - To the Stars in No Time.
    This column is a followup to a previous Alternate View column [Analog, June-'89] about "wormholes", faster-than-light travel, and time machines, which was based on a spectacular theoretical breakthrough in general relativity. It described how a sufficiently advanced civilization might construct a stable wormhole (a curved-space shortcut between one region of space and another) and use it both for faster-than-light travel and for time travel, with no laws of physics violated in the process except causality (the principle that a cause must (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. John G. Cramer (1983). The Arrow of Electromagnetic Time and the Generalized Absorber Theory. Foundations of Physics 13 (9):887-902.
    The problem of the direction of electromagnetic time, i.e., the complete dominance of retarded electromagnetic radiation over advanced radiation in the universe, is considered in the context of a generalized form of the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory in an open expanding universe with a singularity atT=0. It is shown that the application of a four-vector reflection boundary condition at the singularity leads to the observed dominance of retarded radiation; it also clarifies the role of advanced and retarded waves in the emission (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. John G. Cramer, Wormholes and Time Machines.
    Science fiction writers, to avoid undue delays in the story's plot line, need a way of beating the speed of light speed limit of the universe. Most readers of this magazine are familiar with the gimmicks that have been used for faster than light travel: warp drives, detours through hyperspace, matter to tachyon conversion, trans spatial jumps, and dives past the singularity of a rotating black hole. But perhaps the faster than light mechanism which has the best credentials in orthodox (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Newton C. A. Da Costa, Otávio Bueno & Steven French (1997). Suppes Predicates for Space-Time. Synthese 112 (2):271-279.
    We formulate Suppes predicates for various kinds of space-time: classical Euclidean, Minkowski's, and that of General Relativity. Starting with topological properties, these continua are mathematically constructed with the help of a basic algebra of events; this algebra constitutes a kind of mereology, in the sense of Lesniewski. There are several alternative, possible constructions, depending, for instance, on the use of the common field of reals or of a non-Archimedian field (with infinitesimals). Our approach was inspired by the work of Whitehead (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Newton C. A. Da Costa & Adonai S. Sant'Anna (2002). Time in Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 32 (11):1785-1796.
    We use Padoa's principle of independence of primitive symbols in axiomatic systems in order to show that time is dispensable in continuum thermodynamics, according to the axiomatic formulation of Gurtin and Williams. We also show how to define time by means of the remaining primitive concepts of Gurtin and Williams system. Finally, we introduce thermodynamics without time as a primitive concept.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Charles B. Daniels (1970). Seeing Through a Time-Gap. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):354 – 359.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Paul Davies (1977). The Physics of Time Asymmetry. University of California Press.
    The physics of time asymmetry has never been a single well-defined subject, but more a collection of consistency problems which arise in almost all branches ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. O. Costa de Beauregard (1976). Time Symmetry and Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 6 (5):539-559.
    A drastic resolution of the quantum paradoxes is proposed, combining (I) von Neumann's postulate that collapse of the state vector is due to the act of observation, and (II) my reinterpretation of von Neumann's quantal irreversibility as an equivalence between wave retardation and entropy increase, both being “factlike” rather than “lawlike” (Mehlberg). This entails a coupling of the two de jure symmetries between (I) retarded and (II) advanced waves, and between Aristotle's information as (I) learning and (II) willing awareness. Symmetric (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 235