Bookmark and Share

Pleasure

Edited by Chris Heathwood (University of Colorado, Boulder)
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:History/traditions: Pleasure
637 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 637
Material to categorize
  1. D. C. B. (1961). The Problem of Tragedy. Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Julian Baggini (2014). The Pleasures of the Table. The Philosophers' Magazine 65:68-74.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Rudolf Bernet (2001). Lust en onlust: Poging tot een filosofische fundering Van de psychoanalytische begrippen. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (3):517 - 541.
    A correct understanding of what Freud means by “pleasure” and what he thinks of the possible ways to obtain pleasure requires an examination of his conceptions of the drive and of the libidinal body. Both theories are built on a variety of traditional philosophical views, the examination of which can help to overcome some of their obscurities. The reference to Leibniz and his Aristotelian understanding of the relation between pleasure and the force (vis activa) which animates the substance and maintains (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. James Bogen & J. M. E. Moravcsik (1982). Aristotle's Forbidden Sweets. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (2):111-127.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. V. C. C. (1955). Man and His Tragic Life. Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):164-164.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus & Others.
    This is a chapter of what was to be a book. It sketches Aristippus’ ethics and some of the arguments generated by that ethics.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lawrence Crocker (1976). Egoistic Hedonism. Analysis 36 (4):168 - 176.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. G. D. D. (1964). The Tragic Protest. Review of Metaphysics 18 (2):378-378.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. James Griffin (1979). Is Unhappiness Morally More Important Than Happiness? Philosophical Quarterly 29 (114):47-55.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. R. Heinaman (2007). Eudaimonia as an Activity in Nicomachean Ethics I. 8-12. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:247-279.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. E. E. Constance Jones (1894). The Rationality of Hedonism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 3 (1):29 - 45.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. D. Lee & M. R. Hyman (2008). Hedonic/Functional Congruity Between Stores and Private Label Brands. Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice 16 (3):219--232.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Karmen Mackendrick (1994). Polymorphous Pleasures: A Study in Grace. Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The dissertation is an exploration of pleasure, particularly in its more intense forms, as a moment of paradox . It is suggested that the paradoxicality of pleasure unfolds particularly in relation to time and to desire. In the case of time, moments of pleasure seem to move between, or to display the paradoxicality of, time as movement and eternity, often considered atemporal. Pleasure likewise seems to move between desire and satisfaction. Theories of pleasure and particular cases of pleasure are examined (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Peter J. Markie (1977). Fred Feldman and the Cartesian Circle. Philosophical Studies 31 (6):429 - 432.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. H. R. Marshall (1893). Ii.--Hedonic Aesthetics. Mind 2 (5):15-41.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1893). Hedonic Æsthetics. Mind 2 (5):15-41.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. W. K. McAllister (1953). Toward a Re-Examination of Psychological Hedonism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (4):499-505.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Robert Nozick, The Experience Machine.
    Robert Nozick (1936-2000) mas a professor of philosopl, at Harvarcl I niversity. In this selection from his Anarchy State, and Utopia. he argues againsr. the hedonism of Ben..
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. D. D. O. (1961). The Tragic Finale. Review of Metaphysics 14 (3):567-567.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael Otsuka, Are Deontological Constraints Irrational?
    Most deontologists find bedrock in the Pauline doctrine that it is morally objectionable to do evil in order that good will come of it. Uncontroversially, this doctrine condemns the killing of an innocent person simply in order to maximize the sum total of happiness. It rules out the conscription of a worker to his or her certain death in order to repair a fault that is interfering with the live broadcast of a World Cup match that a billion spectators have (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. B. R. Philip (1940). Studies in High Speed Continuous Work: IV. Motivation and Hedonic Tone. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):226.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. E. A. R. (1965). Bentham. Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):153-153.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ivan Soll (1986). The Hopelessness of Hedonism and the Will to Power. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (2):97-112.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. J. T. (1968). The Birth of Tragedy. Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):558-558.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. R. F. T. (1958). The Ways of Enjoyment. Review of Metaphysics 12 (2):322-322.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Wladyslaw Tatarkiewicz (1949). Psychological Hedonism. Synthese 8 (1):409-425.
  27. Régis Tomàs (2007). Le plaisir de rire. Multitudes 3 (3):201-208.
    According to Bergson, there is no laugh without an « anaesthesia of the heart ». A kind of malice always ultimately lies in the depths of the pleasure of laughter. Can this pleasure be mora l ? It creates an affective community which can be both the site of identity and that of challenge, of calling everything into question. Cathartic, conservative, revolutionary, philosophical, desperate, the pleasure of laughter is a complex passion which must be taken seriously.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Roslyn Weiss (1990). A Rejoinder to Professors Gosling and Taylor. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (1):117-118.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert E. Wood (1992). Beauty and Holiness. Review of Metaphysics 45 (4):867-868.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Pleasure and Pain
  1. George Ainslie (2009). Pleasure and Aversion: Challenging the Conventional Dichotomy. Inquiry 52 (4):357 – 377.
    Philosophy and its descendents in the behavioral sciences have traditionally divided incentives into those that are sought and those that are avoided. Positive incentives are held to be both attractive and memorable because of the direct effects of pleasure. Negative incentives are held to be unattractive but still memorable (the problem of pain) because they force unpleasant emotions on an individual by an unmotivated process, either a hardwired response (unconditioned response) or one substituted by association (conditioned response). Negative incentives are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Murat Aydede (forthcoming). A Contemporary Account of Sensory Pleasure. In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. Oxford University Press.
    [This is the penultimate version, please send me an email for the final version]. Some sensations are pleasant, some unpleasant, and some are neither. Furthermore, those that are pleasant or unpleasant are so to different degrees. In this essay, I want to explore what kind of a difference is the difference between these three kinds of sensations. I will develop a comprehensive three-level account of sensory pleasure that is simultaneously adverbialist, functionalist and is also a version of an experiential-desire account.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Murat Aydede (2014). How to Unify Theories of Sensory Pleasure: An Adverbialist Proposal. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):119-133.
    A lot of qualitatively very different sensations can be pleasant or unpleasant. The Felt-Quality Views that conceive of sensory affect as having an introspectively available common phenomenology or qualitative character face the “heterogeneity problem” of specifying what that qualitative common phenomenology is. In contrast, according to the Attitudinal Views, what is common to all pleasant or unpleasant sensations is that they are all “wanted” or “unwanted” in a certain sort of way. The commonality is explained not on the basis of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Murat Aydede (2000). An Analysis of Pleasure Vis-a-Vis Pain. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):537-570.
    I take up the issue of whether pleasure is a kind of sensation or not. This issue was much discussed by philosophers of the 1950’s and 1960’s, and apparently no resolution was reached. There were mainly two camps in the discussion: those who argued for a dispositional account, and those who favored an episodic feeling view of pleasure. Here, relying on some recent scientific research I offer an account of pleasure which neither dispositionalizes nor sensationalizes pleasure. As is usual in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Murat Aydede & Matthew Fulkerson (forthcoming). Reasons and Theories of Sensory Affect. In David Bain, Michael Brady & Jennifer Corns (eds.), The Nature of Pain.
    Some sensory experiences are pleasant, some unpleasant. This is a truism. But understanding what makes these experiences pleasant and unpleasant is not an easy job. Various difficulties and puzzles arise as soon as we start theorizing. There are various philosophical theories on offer that seem to give different accounts for the positive or negative affective valences of sensory experiences. In this paper, we will look at the current state of art in the philosophy of mind, present the main contenders, critically (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Murat Aydede & Matthew Fulkerson (2014). Affect: Representationalists' Headache. Philosophical Studies 170 (2):175-198.
    Representationalism is the view that the phenomenal character of experiences is identical to their representational content of a certain sort. This view requires a strong transparency condition on phenomenally conscious experiences. We argue that affective qualities such as experienced pleasantness or unpleasantness are counter-examples to the transparency thesis and thus to the sort of representationalism that implies it.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alexander Bain (1892). Pleasure and Pain. Mind 1 (2):161-187.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Bain (2013). What Makes Pains Unpleasant? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):69-89.
    The unpleasantness of pain motivates action. Hence many philosophers have doubted that it can be accounted for purely in terms of pain’s possession of indicative representational content. Instead, they have explained it in terms of subjects’ inclinations to stop their pains, or in terms of pain’s imperative content. I claim that such “noncognitivist” accounts fail to accommodate unpleasant pain’s reason-giving force. What is needed, I argue, is a view on which pains are unpleasant, motivate, and provide reasons in virtue of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David Bain & Michael Brady (2014). Pain, Pleasure, and Unpleasure. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):1-14.
    Compare your pain when immersing your hand in freezing water and your pleasure when you taste your favourite wine. The relationship seems obvious. Your pain experience is unpleasant, aversive, negative, and bad. Your experience of the wine is pleasant, attractive, positive, and good. Pain and pleasure are straightforwardly opposites. Or that, at any rate, can seem beyond doubt, and to leave little more to be said. But, in fact, it is not beyond doubt. And, true or false, it leaves a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David Benatar (2011). No Life is Good. The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):62-66.
    The worst pains seem to be worse than the best pleasures are good. Anybody who doubts this should consider what choice they would make if they wereoffered the option of securing an hour of the most sublime pleasures possible in exchange for suffering an hour of the worst pain possible.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Yitzchak M. Binik (1997). Pain, Pleasure, and the Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):440-441.
    The target articles by blumberg et al. and berkley reflect some of the recent major theoretical and clinical advances in two areas of pain research. These two articles also represent two very different approaches to which type of variables are considered relevant to the study of pain. These different approaches are contrasted in the context of the different emphases in pain and pleasure research.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alex Blum (1996). The Agony of Pain. Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3-4):117-120.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Francis H. Bradley (1888). On Pleasure, Pain, Desire and Volition. Mind 13 (49):1-36.
  14. Ben Bramble (2013). The Distinctive Feeling Theory of Pleasure. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):201-217.
    In this article, I attempt to resuscitate the perennially unfashionable distinctive feeling theory of pleasure (and pain), according to which for an experience to be pleasant (or unpleasant) is just for it to involve or contain a distinctive kind of feeling. I do this in two ways. First, by offering powerful new arguments against its two chief rivals: attitude theories, on the one hand, and the phenomenological theories of Roger Crisp, Shelly Kagan, and Aaron Smuts, on the other. Second, by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Caroline Walker Bynum (2006). Suspended Animation: Pain, Pleasure, and Punishment in Medieval Culture. Common Knowledge 12 (3):516-517.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. E. J. C. (1969). Pleasure and Pain. Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):126-127.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Roderick M. Chisholm (1987). Brentano's Theory of Pleasure and Pain. Topoi 6 (1):59-64.
  18. Oliver Conolly (2005). Pleasure and Pain in Literature. Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):305-320.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Joseph L. Cowan (1968). Pleasure and Pain: A Study in Philosophical Psychology. Macmillan.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2013). What Role for Emotions in Well-Being? Philosophical Topics 41 (1):123-142.
    It is striking that for each major theory of well-being, there exists a companion theory of the emotions. Thus, to classical hedonic views of well-being, there corresponds no less classical pure feeling views of the emotions; to desire views that conceive of well-being in terms of desire satisfaction, there corresponds a variety of theories approaching the emotions in terms of the satisfaction/frustration of desires; and finally, to so called objective list theories of well-being, there corresponds a variety of theories that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Andreas Dorschel (2011). Music and Pain. In Jane Fulcher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the New Cultural History of Music. Oxford University Press. 68-79.
    Ancient mythology related music to pain in a twofold way. Pain is the punishment inflicted for producing inferior music: the fate of Marsyas; music is sublimation of pain: the achievement of Orpheus and of Philomela. Both aspects have played defining roles in Western musical culture. Pain’s natural expression is the scream. To be present in music at all, pain needs to be transformed. So even where music expresses pain, at the same time it appeases that very pain. Unlike the scream, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 637