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Pleasure

Edited by Chris Heathwood (University of Colorado, Boulder)
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  1. A. H. B. Allen (1931). Pleasure and Instinct. Philosophy 6 (22):267-268.
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  2. D. C. B. (1961). The Problem of Tragedy. Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
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  3. Julian Baggini (2014). The Pleasures of the Table. The Philosophers' Magazine 65:68-74.
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  4. Rudolf Bernet (2001). Lust en onlust: Poging tot een filosofische fundering Van de psychoanalytische begrippen. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (3):517 - 541.
    A correct understanding of what Freud means by “pleasure” and what he thinks of the possible ways to obtain pleasure requires an examination of his conceptions of the drive and of the libidinal body. Both theories are built on a variety of traditional philosophical views, the examination of which can help to overcome some of their obscurities. The reference to Leibniz and his Aristotelian understanding of the relation between pleasure and the force (vis activa) which animates the substance and maintains (...)
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  5. James Bogen & J. M. E. Moravcsik (1982). Aristotle's Forbidden Sweets. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (2):111-127.
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  6. V. C. C. (1955). Man and His Tragic Life. Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):164-164.
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  7. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus & Others.
    This is a chapter of what was to be a book. It sketches Aristippus’ ethics and some of the arguments generated by that ethics.
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  8. Lawrence Crocker (1976). Egoistic Hedonism. Analysis 36 (4):168 - 176.
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  9. G. D. D. (1964). The Tragic Protest. Review of Metaphysics 18 (2):378-378.
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  10. J. Dillon (1997). The Pleasures and Perils of Soul-Gardening. The Studia Philonica Annual 9:190-197.
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  11. Fred Feldman (2005). Pleasure and the Good Life. Mind 114 (454):414-417.
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  12. Michel Foucault & Robert Hurley (1988). The Use of Pleasure. Philosophy and Rhetoric 21 (3):237-240.
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  13. Frank Govett & John Lubbock (1889). The Pains of Life, a Reply to Sir John Lubbock's 'Pleasures of Life'.
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  14. James Griffin (1979). Is Unhappiness Morally More Important Than Happiness? Philosophical Quarterly 29 (114):47-55.
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  15. R. Heinaman (2007). Eudaimonia as an Activity in Nicomachean Ethics I. 8-12. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:247-279.
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  16. C. E. M. Joad (1952). The Pleasure of Being Oneself. Philosophical Review 61 (4):607-608.
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  17. E. E. Constance Jones (1894). The Rationality of Hedonism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 3 (1):29 - 45.
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  18. John Laird (1941). Other People's Pleasures and One's Own: An Ethical Discussion: PHILOSOPHY. Philosophy 16 (61):39-55.
    The opinion that I want to discuss in this essay is fairly commonly although not universally held among moralists. It is the opinion that there is never a moral duty to try to promote one's own pleasure for the sake of that pleasure although, contrariwise, there is often a moral duty to try to promote the pleasure of others for the sake of that pleasure. I cannot myself assent to the view, and I want to explain why I cannot; but (...)
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  19. D. Lee & M. R. Hyman (2008). Hedonic/Functional Congruity Between Stores and Private Label Brands. Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice 16 (3):219--232.
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  20. Jerrold Levinson (1998). The Pleasures of Aesthetics. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):555-556.
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  21. Morgan C. Lloyd (1929). Consonance of Welfare and Pleasure. Mind 38:207.
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  22. John Lubbock (1887). The Pleasures of Life.
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  23. Karmen Mackendrick (1994). Polymorphous Pleasures: A Study in Grace. Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The dissertation is an exploration of pleasure, particularly in its more intense forms, as a moment of paradox . It is suggested that the paradoxicality of pleasure unfolds particularly in relation to time and to desire. In the case of time, moments of pleasure seem to move between, or to display the paradoxicality of, time as movement and eternity, often considered atemporal. Pleasure likewise seems to move between desire and satisfaction. Theories of pleasure and particular cases of pleasure are examined (...)
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  24. Peter J. Markie (1977). Fred Feldman and the Cartesian Circle. Philosophical Studies 31 (6):429 - 432.
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  25. H. R. Marshall (1893). Ii.--Hedonic Aesthetics. Mind 2 (5):15-41.
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  26. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1893). Hedonic Æsthetics. Mind 2 (5):15-41.
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  27. G. Mcaleer (2007). Pleasure: A Reflection on Deus Caritas Est. Nova Et Vetera 5:315-324.
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  28. W. K. McAllister (1953). Toward a Re-Examination of Psychological Hedonism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (4):499-505.
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  29. Robert Nozick, The Experience Machine.
    Robert Nozick (1936-2000) mas a professor of philosopl, at Harvarcl I niversity. In this selection from his Anarchy State, and Utopia. he argues againsr. the hedonism of Ben..
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  30. D. D. O. (1961). The Tragic Finale. Review of Metaphysics 14 (3):567-567.
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  31. Michael Otsuka (2011). Are Deontological Constraints Irrational? In Ralf Bader & John Meadowcroft (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Nozick. Cambridge University Press.
    Most deontologists find bedrock in the Pauline doctrine that it is morally objectionable to do evil in order that good will come of it. Uncontroversially, this doctrine condemns the killing of an innocent person simply in order to maximize the sum total of happiness. It rules out the conscription of a worker to his or her certain death in order to repair a fault that is interfering with the live broadcast of a World Cup match that a billion spectators have (...)
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  32. David L. Perry (1970). Pleasure and Justification. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 51 (2):174.
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  33. B. R. Philip (1940). Studies in High Speed Continuous Work: IV. Motivation and Hedonic Tone. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):226.
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  34. E. A. R. (1965). Bentham. Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):153-153.
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  35. Gilbert Ryle & W. B. Gallie (1954). Pleasure. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 28:135-164.
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  36. Eva Schaper (1984). Pleasure, Preference & Value. Studies in Philosophical Aesthetics. Crítica: Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofía 16 (48):105-109.
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  37. Sibley Sibley (1951). AWTON'S Philosophy for Pleasure. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 12:450.
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  38. Ivan Soll (1986). The Hopelessness of Hedonism and the Will to Power. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (2):97-112.
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  39. J. T. (1968). The Birth of Tragedy. Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):558-558.
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  40. R. F. T. (1958). The Ways of Enjoyment. Review of Metaphysics 12 (2):322-322.
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  41. Wladyslaw Tatarkiewicz (1949). Psychological Hedonism. Synthese 8 (1):409-425.
  42. C. C. W. Taylor (1968). The Concept of Pleasure. Philosophical Books 9 (1):19-21.
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  43. Lauren Tillinghast (2010). The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work. [REVIEW] Philosophical Practice 5 (1):598-599.
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  44. Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoi & M. T. W. (1896). Vicious Pleasures [Articles Tr. From the Fr. By W.M.T.].
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  45. Régis Tomàs (2007). Le plaisir de rire. Multitudes 3 (3):201-208.
    According to Bergson, there is no laugh without an « anaesthesia of the heart ». A kind of malice always ultimately lies in the depths of the pleasure of laughter. Can this pleasure be mora l ? It creates an affective community which can be both the site of identity and that of challenge, of calling everything into question. Cathartic, conservative, revolutionary, philosophical, desperate, the pleasure of laughter is a complex passion which must be taken seriously.
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  46. Roslyn Weiss (1990). A Rejoinder to Professors Gosling and Taylor. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (1):117-118.
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  47. Frederic Lyman Wells (1924). Pleasure and Behavior. Journal of Philosophy 21 (20):558-559.
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  48. Michael Williams (2009). A Traversal Beyond the Pleasure Principle: From Pervert to Schizophrenic: FreudSigmund,.1856-1939Jenseits des Lustprinzips. [REVIEW] Theory and Event 12 (3).
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  49. Robert E. Wood (1992). Beauty and Holiness. Review of Metaphysics 45 (4):867-868.
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  50. William Kelley Wright (1908). The Ethical Significance of Feeling, Pleasure, and Happiness in Modern Non-Hedonistic Systems. Philosophical Review 17 (5):559-560.
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