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  1. Fritz Allhoff & David Monroe (eds.) (2007). Food & Philosophy. Blackwell.
    Provides a critical reflection on what and how we eat can contribute to a robust enjoyment of gastronomic pleasures A thoughtful, yet playful collection which ...
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  2. Julia Annas (1987). Epicurus on Pleasure and Happiness. Philosophical Topics 15 (2):5-21.
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  3. Thordis Arrhenius (2009). The Pleasure of the Surface. In Eva Ebersberger, Daniela Zyman & Thordis Arrhenius (eds.), Jorge Otero-Pailos: The Ethics of Dust. Dist. By Art Publishers.
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  4. Jean Austin (1968). Pleasure and Happiness. Philosophy 43 (163):51 - 62.
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  5. F. Aveling (1931). Pleasure and Instinct. By A. H. B. Allen (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. 1930. Pp. Lx + 336. Price 12s. 6d.). Philosophy 6 (22):267-.
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  6. Glen Baier (1999). A Proper Arbiter of Pleasure: Rousseau on the Control of Sexual Desire. Philosophical Forum 30 (4):249–268.
  7. E. Bedford (1959). Pleasure and Belief, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73:73-92.
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  8. E. E. Benitez (1991). Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being. Review of Metaphysics 45 (2):401-404.
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  9. Howard Berenbaum (2002). Varieties of Joy-Related Pleasurable Activities and Feelings. Cognition and Emotion 16 (4):473-494.
  10. Thomas Blackson (2012). Extrinsic Attitudinal Pleasure. Philosophical Studies 159 (2):277-291.
    I argue for an alternative interpretation of some of the examples Fred Feldman uses to establish his theory of happiness. According to Feldman, the examples show that certain utterances of the form S is pleased/glad that P and S is displeased/sad that P should be interpreted as expressions of extrinsic attitudinal pleasure and displeasure and hence must be excluded from the aggregative sum of attitudinal pleasure and displeasure that constitutes happiness. I develop a new interpretation of Feldman’s examples. My interpretation (...)
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  11. Alex Blum (1991). A Note on Pleasure. Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (October):367-70.
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  12. Johan Brannmark (2006). Like the Bloom on Youths' : How Pleasure Completes Our Lives. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  13. Ralph Wendell Burhoe (1982). Pleasure and Reason as Adaptations to Nature's Requirements. Zygon 17 (2):113-131.
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  14. Paul Carus (1896). The Nature of Pleasure and Pain. The Monist 6 (3):432-442.
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  15. Charles Carver (2003). Pleasure as a Sign You Can Attend to Something Else: Placing Positive Feelings Within a General Model of Affect. Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):241-261.
  16. Shaoming Chen (2010). On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
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  17. Vimala Chenginimattam (2009). Sexual Dilemmas and Moral Reasoning an Approach to Girls' Sexuality and Sexual Pleasure. Journal of Dharma 34 (1):107-116.
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  18. S. Marc Cohen (1969). The Concept of Pleasure. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 78:386-390.
    Review of The Concept of Pleasure, by David L. Perry (Mouton:1967).
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  19. Joseph Corabi (2008). Pleasure's Role in Evolution: A Response to Robinson. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):78-86.
    In this paper, I reconstruct and sketch an evolutionary argument against epiphenomenalism in the spirit of William James'. This version of the argument is more charitable to James than the one attributed to him in William Robinson's recent article 'Evolution and Epiphenomenalism' and here I show how it bypasses Robinson's criticisms.
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  20. Mary F. Dallman (2006). Make Love, Not War: Both Serve to Defuse Stress-Induced Arousal Through the Dopaminergic “Pleasure” Network. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):227-228.
    Nell restricts cruelty to hominids, although good evidence suggests that secondary aggression in rodents and particularly primates may be considered cruel. A considerable literature shows that glucocorticoid secretion stimulated by stress facilitates learning, memory, arousal, and aggressive behavior. Either secondary aggression (to a conspecific) or increased affiliative behavior reduces stressor-induced activity, suggesting the reward system can be satisfied by other behaviors than cruelty.
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  21. Durant Drake (1919). Is Pleasure Objective? Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (24):665-668.
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  22. Paul Draper (1989). Pain and Pleasure: An Evidential Problem for Theists. Noûs 23 (3):331-350.
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  23. Laurette Dubé & Jordan Le Bel (2003). The Content and Structure of Laypeople's Concept of Pleasure. Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):263-295.
  24. C. J. Ducasse (1943). Esthetic Contemplation and Sense Pleasure--A Reply. Journal of Philosophy 40 (6):156-159.
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  25. Steven M. Duncan, Desire, Love, and Happiness.
    In this paper, I explore the concept of happiness by relating it to those of desire, pleasure, and love, arriving at the classical view that objective happiness consists in the possession and enjoyment of the good.
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  26. Karl Duncker (1941). On Pleasure, Emotion, and Striving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1 (June):391-430.
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  27. Fred Feldman (2007). Reply to Elinor Mason and Alastair Norcross. Utilitas 19 (3):398-406.
    In comments originally presented at the ISUS conference at Dartmouth College in 2005, Elinor Mason and Alastair Norcross raised a number of objections to various things I said in Pleasure and the Good Life. One especially interesting objection concerns one of my central claims about the nature of pleasure. I distinguished between sensory pleasure and attitudinal pleasure. I said that a feeling counts as a sensory pleasure if the one who feels it takes intrinsic attitudinal pleasure in the fact that (...)
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  28. Fred Feldman (2007). Precis of Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties, and Plausiblity of Hedonism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):405 - 408.
  29. Fred Feldman (2004). Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties and Plausibility of Hedonism. Clarendon Press.
    Fred Feldman's fascinating new book sets out to defend hedonism as a theory about the Good Life. He tries to show that, when carefully and charitably interpreted, certain forms of hedonism yield plausible evaluations of human lives. Feldman begins by explaining the question about the Good Life. As he understands it, the question is not about the morally good life or about the beneficial life. Rather, the question concerns the general features of the life that is good in itself for (...)
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  30. Fred Feldman (1988). Two Questions About Pleasure. In D. F. Austin (ed.), Philosophical Analysis. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 59--81.
    In this paper, I present my solutions to two closely related questions about pleasure. One of these questions is fairly well known. The second question seems to me to be at least as interesting as the first, but it apparently hasn't interested quite so many philosophers.
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  31. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
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  32. Alan E. Fuchs (1976). The Production of Pleasure by Stimulation of the Brain: An Alleged Conflict Between Science and Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (June):494-505.
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  33. W. B. Gallie (1954). Pleasure, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 147:147-164.
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  34. Adèle Olivia Gladwell (1995). Catamania: The Dissonance of Female Pleasure and Dissent. Distributors to the Us Book Trade, Subterranean Company.
  35. Irwin Goldstein (1988). The Rationality of Pleasure-Seeking Animals. In Sander Lee (ed.), Inquiries Into Value. Edwin Mellen Press.
    Reason guides pleasure-seeking animals in leading them to prefer pleasure to pain.
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  36. Irwin Goldstein (1985). Hedonic Pluralism. Philosophical Studies 48 (1):49 - 55.
    Hedonic pluralism is the thesis that 'pleasure' cannot be given a single, all-embracing definition. In this paper I criticize the reasoning people use to support this thesis and suggest some plausible all-encompassing analyses that easily avoid the kinds of objections people raise to all-encompassing analyses.
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  37. Dane Gordon (1997). Pleasure Now. Philosophy Now 19:15-19.
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  38. P. Hadreas (1999). Intentionality and the Neurobiology of Pleasure. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (2):219-236.
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  39. John C. Hall (1966). Quantity of Pleasure. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 67:35 - 52.
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  40. Raja Halwani (2010). Philosophy of Love, Sex, and Marriage: An Introduction. Routledge.
    Introduction -- Part I: Love -- What is love? -- Romantic love -- The basis of romantic love -- Love and morality -- Part II: Sex -- What is sex? -- Sex, pleasure, and morality -- Sexual objectification -- Sexual perversion and fantasy -- Part III: Marriage -- What is marriage? -- Controversies over same-sex.
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  41. Edwin Hartman (1996). Pleasure and Action. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:125-127.
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  42. Daniel M. Haybron (2001). Happiness and Pleasure. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):501-528.
  43. Chris Heathwood (2007). Review of Roger Crisp, Reasons and the Good. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (7).
  44. Chris Heathwood (2006). Desire Satisfactionism and Hedonism. Philosophical Studies 128 (3):539-563.
    Hedonism and the desire-satisfaction theory of welfare ("desire satisfactionism") are typically seen as archrivals in the contest over identifying what makes one's life go best. It is surprising, then, that the most plausible form of hedonism just is the most plausible form of desire satisfactionism. How can a single theory of welfare be a version of both hedonism and desire satisfactionism? The answer lies in what pleasure is: pleasure is, in my view, the subjective satisfaction of desire. This thesis about (...)
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  45. Bennett W. Helm (2002). Felt Evaluations: A Theory of Pleasure and Pain. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):13-30.
    This paper argues that pleasure and pains are not qualia and they are not to be analyzed in terms of supposedly antecedently intelligible mental states like bodily sensation or desire. Rather, pleasure and pain are char- acteristic of a distinctive kind of evaluation that is common to emotions, desires, and (some) bodily sensations. These are felt evaluations: pas- sive responses to attend to and be motivated by the import of something impressing itself on us, responses that are nonetheless simultaneously con- (...)
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  46. J. F. M. Hunter (1987). Pleasure. Dialogue 26 (03):491-.
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  47. Thomas Hurka (2010). The Best Things in Life: A Guide to What Really Matters. Oxford University Press.
    Feeling good: four ways -- Finding that feeling -- The place of pleasure -- Knowing what's what -- Making things happen -- Being good -- Love and friendship -- Putting it together.
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  48. O. Irrera (2010). Pleasure and Transcendence of the Self: Notes on 'a Dialogue Too Soon Interrupted' Between Michel Foucault and Pierre Hadot. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):995-1017.
    The fact that the notion of ‘practice’ has achieved an ever-increasing relevance in the most various fields of knowledge must not overshadow that it can be interpreted in so many different ways as to orient fairly different historiographical paradigms and philosophical conceptions. Starting with the two main issues of Hadot’s criticism of Foucault (the lack of a distinction between joy and pleasure and the fact that his account does not underscore that the individual Self is ultimately transcended by universal Reason), (...)
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  49. Arnold Isenberg (1964). Comments on "Pleasure and Falsity". American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (2):96 - 100.
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  50. Ingvar Johannson (2001). Species and Dimensions of Pleasure. Metaphysica 2 (2):39-72.
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