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  1. John Alderson (1998). [Book Review] Principled Policing, Protecting the Public with Integrity. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (2):55-61.
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  2. Philip Arantz (1993). A Collusion of Powers. P. Arantz.
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  3. Richard Biernacki (2014). Political Epistemics: The Secret Police, the Opposition and the End of East German Socialism. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):e4.
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  4. Irena Blonder (2010). Public Interests and Private Passions: A Peculiar Case of Police Whistleblowing. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):258-277.
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  5. Howard Cohen (1991). Power and Restraint: The Moral Dimension of Police Work. Praeger.
    This book uses a moral perspective grounded in the social contract to define the responsibilities assumed by the police.
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  6. Howard Cohen (1987). Overstepping Police Authority. Criminal Justice Ethics 6 (2):52-60.
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  7. Howard Cohen (1986). Exploiting Police Authority. Criminal Justice Ethics 5 (2):23-31.
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  8. Michael Davis (1991). Do Cops Really Need a Code of Ethics? Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (2):14-28.
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  9. Edwin J. Delattre (2002/2011). Character and Cops: Ethics in Policing. Aei Press.
    Since the first edition was published in 1989, Character and Cops has been considered the bible of police ethics training.
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  10. James F. Doyle (1992). Review Essay / Empowering and Restraining the Police: How to Accomplish Both. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (1):52-57.
    Howard S. Cohen and Michael Feldberg, Power and Restraint: The Moral Dimension of Police Work, New York Praeger, 1991; xvii + 166 pp.
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  11. Frederick Elliston & Michael Feldberg (eds.) (1985). Moral Issues in Police Work. Rowman & Allanheld.
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  12. Debbie J. Goodman (2004). Enforcing Ethics: A Scenario-Based Workbook for Police and Corrections Recruits, Officers, and Supervisors. Pearson/Prentice Hall.
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  13. Alexander Gourevitch (2008). The New Police Science: The Police Power in Domestic and International Governance. Edited by Markus D. Dubber and Mariana Valverde. Constellations 15 (4):590-592.
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  14. David A. Hansen (1973). Police Ethics. Springfield, Ill.,Thomas.
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  15. Clive Harfield (2012). Police Informers and Professional Ethics. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (2):73-95.
    Abstract The use of informers is morally problematic for police institutions, for investigation managers, and for those individuals either who act as informers or who have daily responsibility for handling informers. This paper examines the moral issues concerning informers at each of these levels. Recourse to informers can be accommodated within Miller and Blackler's moral theory of policing. Within this context, criteria for the morally justifiable deployment of informers are proposed and supplemented with further proposed criteria for morally justifiable informer (...)
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  16. Circuit Judge Hatchett (forthcoming). It is Not Entrapment for an Undercover Officer to Tell the Defendant That Making Pcp is as “Easy as Baking a Cake”. Criminal Justice Ethics.
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  17. William C. Heffernan & Timothy Stroup (eds.) (1985). Police Ethics: Hard Choices in Law Enforcement. J. Jay Press.
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  18. Joseph P. Hester (1997). Law Enforcement Ethics. Abc-Clio.
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  19. Miroslav Jevtović (2009). Uvod U Policijsku Etiku. Kriminalističko-Policijska Akademija.
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  20. Iii Joe Frank Jones (2002). Noble Cause Police Corruption. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2).
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  21. John Kleinig (2004). Police Gratuities. Criminal Justice Ethics 23 (1):33-33.
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  22. John Kleinig (2001). The Blue Wall of Silence. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):1-23.
    The “blue wall of silence” -- the rule that police officers will not testify against each other -- has its roots in an important associational virtue, loyalty, which, in the context of friendship and familial relations, is of central importance. This article seeks to distinguish the worthy roots of the “blue wall” from its frequent corruption in the covering up of serious criminality, and attempts to offer criteria for determining when to testify and when to respond in other ways to (...)
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  23. John Kleinig (1998). Civil Rights and Civil Liberties: Videotaping the Police. Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):42.
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  24. John Kleinig (1996). Police Loyalties. Professional Ethics 5 (1/2):29-42.
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  25. John Kleinig (1996). The Ethics of Policing. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the most systematic, comprehensive and philosophically sophisticated discussion of police ethics yet published. It offers an in-depth analysis of the ethical values that police, as servants of the community, should uphold as they go about their task. The book considers the foundations and purpose of police authority in broad terms but also tackles specific problems such as accountability, the use of force, deceptive stratagems used to gain information or trap the criminally intentioned, corruption, and the tension between (...)
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  26. John Kleinig & Yurong Zhang (eds.) (1993). Professional Law Enforcement Codes: A Documentary Collection. Greenwood Press.
    This volume fills that gap and offers teachers in criminal justice ethics and law enforcement practitioners a rich selection of materials that have emerged in ...
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  27. Carl B. Klockars (2006). Enhancing Police Integrity. Springer.
    How can we enhance police integrity? The authors surveyed over 3000 police officers from 30 U.S. police departments on how they would respond to typical scenarios where integrity is challenged. They studied three police agencies which scored highly on the integrity scale: Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; and St. Petersburg, Florida. The authors conclude that enhancing police integrity goes well beyond culling out "bad apple" police officers. Police administrators should focus on four aspects: organizational rulemaking; detecting, investigating and disciplining (...)
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  28. Rickey D. Lashley (1995). Policework: The Need for a Noble Character. Praeger.
    ...argues against the present law enforcement system, and argues that power and politics have prevented police from achieving their sworn mission.
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  29. Annabelle Lever (2011). Treating People as Equals: Ethical Objections to Racial Profiling and the Composition of Juries. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):61 - 78.
    This paper shows that the problem of treating people as equals in a world marked by deep-seated and, often, recalcitrant inequalities has implications for the way we approach the provision of security and justice. On the one hand, it means that racial profiling will generally be unjustified even when it might promote collective interests in security, on the other, it means that we should strive to create racially mixed juries, even in cases where defendant and alleged-victim are of the same (...)
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  30. Annabelle Lever (2007). What's Wrong with Racial Profiling? Another Look at the Problem. Criminal Justice Ethics 26 (1):20-28.
    According to Mathias Risse and Richard Zeckhauser, racial profiling can be justified in a society, such as the contemporary United States, where the legacy of slavery and segregation is found in lesser but, nonetheless, troubling forms of racial inequality. Racial profiling, Risse and Zeckhauser recognize, is often marked by police abuse and the harassment of racial minorities and by the disproportionate use of race in profiling. These, on their view, are unjustified. But, they contend, this does not mean that all (...)
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  31. Annabelle Lever (2005). Why Racial Profiling is Hard to Justify: A Response to Risse and Zeckhauser. Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (1):94–110.
    In their article, “Racial Profiling,” Risse and Zeckhauser offer a qualified defense of racial profiling in a racist society, such as the contemporary United States of America. It is a qualified defense, because they wish to distinguish racial profiling as it is, and as it might be, and to argue that while the former is not justified, the latter might be. Racial profiling as it is, they recognize, is marked by police abuse and the harassment of racial minorities, and by (...)
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  32. Colleen Lewis, Janet Ransley & Ross Homel (eds.) (2010). The Fitzgerald Legacy: Reforming Public Life in Australia and Beyond. Australian Academic Press.
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  33. Edward A. Malloy (1982/1983). The Ethics of Law Enforcement and Criminal Punishment. University Press of America.
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  34. Gary T. Marx (1992). Under‐the‐Covers Undercover Investigations: Some Reflections on the State's Use of Sex and Deception in Law Enforcement. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (1):13-24.
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  35. Thaddeus Metz (2004). The Justice of Crime Prevention. Theoria 51 (105):104-128.
    In this essay, I critically evaluate the new South African state's approach to crime prevention in light of the Kantian principle of respect of persons. I show that the five most common explanations of why the state must fight crime are unconvincing; provide a novel, respect-based account of why justice requires the state to prevent crime; and specify which crime fighting techniques the state must adopt in order to meet this requirement. Reviewing the South African state's criminal justice policies and (...)
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  36. Seumas Miller (2010). Integrity Systems and Professional Reporting in Police Organizations. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):241-257.
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  37. Seumas Miller (1998). Corruption and Anti-Corruption in the Profession of Policing. Professional Ethics 6 (3/4):83-106.
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  38. Seumas Miller (1997). Police Ethics. Allen & Unwin.
    The ethical issues that affect police officers of all ranks and locations are explored in this fascinating introduction to the stark and shocking reality of real-life policing situations. Drawing on examples from the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom, Asia, and South Africa, this book examines policing incidents from the everyday to public events that capture widespread media attention. Fully updated with revised case studies, this edition offers discussion and analysis of current ethical issues, including zero-tolerance policing; community-based policing; private (...)
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  39. Mark H. Moore & Anthony A. Braga (2004). Police Performance Measurement: A Normative Framework. Criminal Justice Ethics 23 (1):3-19.
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  40. Barbara Morgan, Franklyn Morgan, Victoria Foster & Jered Kolbert (2000). Promoting the Moral and Conceptual Development of Law Enforcement Trainees: A Deliberate Psychological Educational Approach. Journal of Moral Education 29 (2):203-218.
    The history of ethical problems and corruption in American law enforcement is well documented. Current law enforcement training lacks a significant focus on ethics training and is in need of modifications which would include a greater emphasis on ethics education. This study drew on cognitive development theory, applied specifically to the domains of moral and conceptual development, to create and implement an educational programme for police officer trainees and college students studying criminal justice. The Deliberate Psychological Education model provided the (...)
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  41. William Ker Muir (1983). Police and Politics. Criminal Justice Ethics 2 (2):3-9.
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  42. Patrick V. Murphy (1985). Commentary: Ethical Issues in Policing. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (2):2-96.
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  43. Peter Neyroud (2006). Ethics in Policing: Performance and the Personalization of Accountability in British Policing and Criminal Justice. Legal Ethics 9:16.
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  44. Thomas W. Nolan (2001). Commentary: Galateas in Blue: Women Police as Decoy Sex Workers. Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (2):2-67.
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  45. Milan Pagon (ed.) (2000). Policing in Central and Eastern Europe: Ethics, Integrity, and Human Rights. College of Police and Security Studies.
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  46. In Policing (forthcoming). Moral Problems. Criminal Justice Ethics.
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  47. Tim Prenzler & Peta Mackay (1995). Police Gratuities: What the Public Think. Criminal Justice Ethics 14 (1):15-25.
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  48. Jeffrey Reiman (1997). Review Essay/the Scope and Limits of Police Ethics. Criminal Justice Ethics 16 (2):41-45.
    John Kleinig, The Ethics of Policing Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. viii + 335pp.
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  49. Neil Richards (2010). Police Loyalty Redux. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):221-240.
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  50. Jim Ruiz & Christine Bono (2004). At What Price a “Freebie"? The Real Cost of Police Gratuities. Criminal Justice Ethics 23 (1):44-54.
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