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  1. Harry Adams (2008). Against Plutocracies: Fighting Political Corruption. Constellations 15 (1):126-147.
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  2. Timo Airaksinen (1984). Coercion, Deterrence, and Authority. Theory and Decision 17 (2):105-117.
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  3. Thornton Anderson (1982). Book Review:The Practice of Political Authority: Authority and the Authoritative. Richard E. Flathman. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (1):164-.
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  4. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2010). Legitimacy Without the Duty to Obey. Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (3):215-239.
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  5. Sven Arntzen (1996). Kant on Duty to Oneself and Resistance to Political Authority. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):409-424.
  6. Iain Atack (2006). Nonviolent Political Action and the Limits of Consent. Theoria 53 (111):87-107.
    The consent theory of power, whereby ruling elites depend ultimately on the submission, cooperation and obedience of the governed as their source of power, is often linked to debates about the effectiveness of non-violent political action. According to this theory, ruling elites depend ultimately on the submission, cooperation and obedience of the governed as their source of power. If this cooperation is with-drawn, then this power is undermined. Iain Atack outlines this theory and examines its strengths and weaknesses. Atack argues (...)
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  7. Harry Beran (1983). What is the Basis of Political Authority? The Monist 66 (4):487-499.
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  8. G. S. Brett (1931). Book Review:The Ethical Basis of Political Authority. W. W. Willoughby. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (2):238-.
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  9. D. J. C. Carmichael (1989). Book Review:The Consent Theory of Political Obligation. Harry Beran. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (4):949-.
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  10. Craig L. Carr (1983). The Problem of Political Authority. The Monist 66 (4):472-486.
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  11. Joseph Chan (2012). Political Authority and Perfectionism: A Response to Quong. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  12. Thomas Christiano (1999). Justice and Disagreement at the Foundations of Political Authority. Ethics 110 (1):165-187.
  13. Meir Dan-cohen (1994). In Defense of Defiance. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (1):24–51.
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  14. François De Smet (2011). Le Tiers Autoritaire: Essai Sur la Nature de l'Autorité Politique. Les Éditions du Cerf.
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  15. William A. Edmundson (2010). Political Authority, Moral Powers and the Intrinsic Value of Obedience. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (1):179-191.
    Three concepts—authority, obedience and obligation—are central to understanding law and political institutions. The three are also involved in the legitimation of the state: an apology for the state has to make a normative case for the state’s authority, for its right to command obedience, and for the citizen’s obligation to obey the state’s commands. Recent discussions manifest a cumulative scepticism about the apologist’s task. Getting clear about the three concepts is, of..
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  16. David Estlund (2005). Political Authority and the Tyranny of Non‐Consent. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):351–367.
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  17. J. P. Euben (1977). Books in Review : TWILIGHT OF AUTHORITY by Robert Nisbet. Oxford University Press, 1975. Pp. Vii, 287. $10.95. Political Theory 5 (1):119-124.
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  18. Walter Farrell (1938). The Philosophy of Sovereignty. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 14:103-111.
  19. James Fishkin (1980). Book Review:Principles of Legislation: The Uses of Political Authority. Michael D. Bayles. [REVIEW] Ethics 90 (4):618-.
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  20. Charles Frankel (1972). Political Disobedience and the Denial of Political Authority. Social Theory and Practice 2 (1):85-98.
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  21. Michael Fœssel (2006). Legitimations of the State: The Weakening of Authority and the Restoration of Power. Constellations 13 (3):308-319.
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  22. Paul Guyer (2012). Hobbes Is of the Opposite Opinion Kant and Hobbes on the Three Authorities in the State. Hobbes Studies 25 (1):91-119.
    Like Hobbes and unlike Locke, Kant denied the possibility of a right to rebellion. But unlike Hobbes, Kant did not argue for a unitary head of state in whom legislative, judicial, and executive powers are inseparable, and thus did not believe that the executive power in a state to whom must be conceded a monopoly of coercion also defines all rights in the state. Instead, Kant insisted upon the necessary division of authority in a state into a separate legislature, executive, (...)
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  23. Elizabeth Gyori (2007). Philosophy as a Threat to Government. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 7:2-3.
    Examination of the subversive nature of philosophy as its students challenge the authority and practices of government agencies and organizations. Draws a series of connections between philosophically oriented protesters and questioners of authority ranging from Socrates to 2004 protesters at the U.S. Republican party’s presidential convention in 2004.
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  24. Toby Handfield & Patrick Emerton (2009). Order and Affray: Defensive Privileges in Warfare. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):382 - 414.
    Just war theory is a difficult, even paradoxical, philosophical topic. It is not just that warfare involves large-scale, organised, deliberate killing, and hence might seem the very paradigm of immorality. The just war tradition sharply divorces the question of whether or not it is permissible to resort to war – the question of jus ad bellum – from the question of how and against whom one may inflict harm once at war – the question of jus in bello. As Michael (...)
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  25. Rebecca Roman Hanrahan & Louise M. Antony (2005). Because I Said So: Toward a Feminist Theory of Authority. Hypatia 20 (4):59-79.
    : Feminism is an antiauthoritarian movement that has sought to unmask many traditional "authorities" as ungrounded. Given this, it might seem as if feminists are required to abandon the concept of authority altogether. But, we argue, the exercise of authority enables us to coordinate our efforts to achieve larger social goods and, hence, should be preserved. Instead, what is needed and what we provide for here is a way to distinguish legitimate authority from objectionable authoritarianism.
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  26. Virginia Held (2005). Legitimate Authority in Non-State Groups Using Violence. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):175–193.
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  27. David Henreckson (2010). A Gift Half Understood: Rediscovering an Incarnational View of Political Authority. Heythrop Journal 51 (4):554-566.
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  28. Timothy Hinton (2010). Naturalism and Authority. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):152-168.
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  29. John Horton (2005). Peter Winch and Political Authority. Philosophical Investigations 28 (3):235–252.
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  30. Curtis Johnson (2008). Political Authority and Obligation in Aristotle. Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):439-447.
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  31. Derek Kelly (1973). Reason and Political Authority. Journal of Value Inquiry 7 (4):261-273.
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  32. Stephen J. Kobrin (2009). Private Political Authority and Public Responsibility. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):349-374.
    Transnational corporations have become actors with significant political power and authority which should entail responsibility and liability, specifically direct liability for complicity in human rights violations. Holding TNCs liable for human rights violations is complicated by the discontinuity between the fragmented legal/political structure of the TNC and its integrated strategic reality and the international state system which privileges sovereignty and non-intervention over the protection of individual rights. However, the post-Westphalian transition—the emergence of multiple authorities, increasing ambiguity of borders and jurisdiction (...)
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  33. Bernd Krehoff (2008). Legitimate Political Authority and Sovereignty: Why States Cannot Be the Whole Story. Res Publica 14 (4):283-297.
    States are believed to be the paradigmatic instances of legitimate political authority. But is their prominence justified? The classic concept of state sovereignty predicts the danger of a fatal deadlock among conflicting authorities unless there is an ultimate authority within a given jurisdiction. This scenario is misguided because the notion of an ultimate authority is conceptually unclear. The exercise of authority is multidimensional and multiattributive, and to understand the relations among authorities we need to analyse this complexity into its different (...)
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  34. Donald J. Kreitzer (1960). Problems of the Origin of Political Authority. Philosophical Studies 10 (10):190-203.
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  35. Robert F. Ladenson & Martin H. Malin (1998). On the Scope of Legitimate Authority. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):59-73.
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  36. Olli Lagerspetz (2012). Peter Winch on Political Authority and Political Culture. Philosophical Investigations 35 (3-4):277-302.
    Peter Winch, in his political philosophy, wanted to rethink the concepts of political authority, legitimacy and political culture, with a starting point in Wittgensteinian ideas. This essay brings together Winch's thoughts on political authority. Developing insights from Wittgenstein's work on certainty, Winch emphasised the unstated background behind any normative stand concerning authority. Ideas of legitimacy and civil society are formed within historically specific political cultures. In the 1990s, Winch was increasingly inclined to emphasise disagreement, which was related to his developing (...)
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  37. B. M. Laing (1930). The Ethical Basis of Political Authority. By Westel W. Willoughby. (New York: The Macmillan Company. 1930. Pp. Viii + 460. Price 15s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 5 (20):627-.
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  38. David Lefkowitz (2004). Legitimate Political Authority and the Duty of Those Subject to It: A Critique of Edmundson. Law and Philosophy 23 (4):399 - 435.
    According to <span class='Hi'>William</span> Edmundson, a legitimatepolitical authority is one that claims tocreate in its subjects a general duty ofobedience to the law, and that succeeds increating in its subjects a duty to obey stateofficials when they apply the law in particularcases. His argument that legitimate politicalauthority does not require the state''s claim tobe true rests on his analysis of legitimatetheoretical authority, and the assumption thattheoretical and practical authority are thesame in the relevant respects, both of whichare challenged here. In (...)
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  39. Murray Low (2006). Democratic Autonomy: Public Reasoning About the Ends of Policy. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):220-224.
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  40. C. M. (1997). Surrender of Judgment and the Consent Theory of Political Authority. Law and Philosophy 16 (2):115-143.
    The aim of this paper is to take the first steps toward providing a refurbished consent theory of political authority, one that rests in part on a reconception of the relationship between the surrender of judgment and the authoritativeness of political institutions. On the standard view, whatever grounds political authority implies that one ought to surrender one's judgment to that of one's political institutions. On the refurbished view, it is the surrender of one's judgment ndash which can plausibly be considered (...)
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  41. Dean J. Machin (2009). The Irrelevance of Democracy to the Public Justification of Political Authority. Res Publica 15 (2):103-120.
    Democracy can be a means to independently valuable ends and/or it can be intrinsically (or non-instrumentally) valuable. One powerful non-instrumental defence of democracy is based on the idea that only it can publicly justify political authority. I contend that this is an argument about the reasonable acceptability of political authority and about the requirements of publicity and that satisfying these requirements has nothing to do with whether a society is democratic or not. Democracy, then, plays no role in publicly justifying (...)
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  42. Avishai Margalit (2005). Political Theology: The Authority of God. Theoria 44 (106):37-50.
    In this article, I will explore an idea of authority as depicted by a religious picture (note the indefinite article). It is a picture, not the picture. It is the picture of God as the supreme decision maker without him being a deliberator. I shall call it the decisionist picture of God. His authority is based on his absolute will unhindered by any laws and rules and in particular by any laws of morality. One may call the decisionist picture of (...)
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  43. Rex Martin (1975). Two Models for Justifying Political Authority. Ethics 86 (1):70-75.
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  44. Thomas May (2004). Political Authority in a Bioterror Emergency. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):159-163.
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  45. Graham McAleer (1999). Giles of Rome on Political Authority. Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (1):21-36.
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  46. Donald Meiklejohn (1966). Book Review:Government Action and Morality. R. S. Downie; Political Authority and Moral Judgment. Glenn Negley. [REVIEW] Ethics 77 (1):73-.
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  47. N. S. Melissidis (2005). Human Condition and Political Authority in Sophocles' Antigone. Philosophical Inquiry 27 (1-2):203-210.
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  48. William J. Meyer (1975). Political Ethics and Political Authority. Ethics 86 (1):61-69.
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  49. Bertram Morris (1973). Gauthier on Hobbes' Moral and Political Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (3):387-392.
    GAUTHIER'S IMPRESSIVE ACCOUNT RESTS ON A SUSTAINED ATTEMPT\nTO RECONSTRUCT HOBBES' THOUGHT FROM MAN AS A\nSELF-MAINTAINING ENGINE TO AN AUTHOR WHO BINDS HIMSELF TO\nAN AGENT (SOVEREIGN), SANCTIONED BY A NONTERMINABLE\nCOVENANT. TO THIS END HE EMPLOYS THE DEVICE OF\nDISTINGUISHING BETWEEN FORMAL AND MATERIAL DEFINITIONS IN\nHOBBES' MORAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. THE VALIDITY OF\nTHIS PROCEDURE IS CALLED INTO QUESTION BY INSISTING THAT\nHOBBES' CONCLUSION CANNOT BE DISSOCIATED FROM HIS\nINSTITUTIONAL ACCOUNT OF THE ARTS OF PEACE.
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  50. Mark C. Murphy (1997). Surrender of Judgment and the Consent Theory of Political Authority. Law and Philosophy 16 (2):115 - 143.
    The aim of this paper is to take the first steps toward providing a refurbished consent theory of political authority, one that rests in part on a reconception of the relationship between the surrender of judgment and the authoritativeness of political institutions. On the standard view, whatever grounds political authority implies that one ought to surrender one's judgment to that of one's political institutions. On the refurbished view, it is the surrender of one's judgment – which can plausibly be considered (...)
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