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  1. Pablo Gilabert (2013). How Should We Think About the Relation Between Principles and Agency? Ethics and Global Politics 6 (2):75-83.
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  2. Pablo Gilabert (2012). Comparative Assessments of Justice, Political Feasibility, and Ideal Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):39-56.
    What should our theorizing about social justice aim at? Many political philosophers think that a crucial goal is to identify a perfectly just society. Amartya Sen disagrees. In The Idea of Justice, he argues that the proper goal of an inquiry about justice is to undertake comparative assessments of feasible social scenarios in order to identify reforms that involve justice-enhancement, or injustice-reduction, even if the results fall short of perfect justice. Sen calls this the “comparative approach” to the theory of (...)
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  3. Pablo Gilabert (2012). From Global Poverty to Global Equality: A Philosophical Exploration. Oxford University Press, UK.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction: The complexity of the debate on global justice -- Part I: Beyond Global Poverty -- 2. Basic positive duties of justice: A contractualist defense -- 3. Negative duties and the libertarian challenge -- 4. The feasibility of global poverty eradication in nonideal circumstances -- Part II: Toward Global Equality -- 5. Humanist versus associativist accounts of global equality -- 6. A humanist defense of global equality -- 7. The feasibility of global (...)
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  4. Pablo Gilabert (2011). Feasibility and Socialism. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (1):52-63.
  5. Pablo Gilabert (2009). The Feasibility of Basic Socioeconomic Human Rights: A Conceptual Exploration. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):659-681.
    To be justifiable, the demands of a conception of human rights and global justice must be such that (a) they focus on the protection of important human interests, and (b) their fulfilment is feasible. I discuss the feasibility condition. I present a general account of the relation between moral desirability, feasibility and obligation within a conception of justice. I analyse feasibility, a complex idea including different types, domains and degrees. It is possible to respond in various ways if the fulfilment (...)
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  6. Pablo Gilabert (2008). Global Justice and Poverty Relief in Nonideal Circumstances. Social Theory and Practice 34 (3):411-438.
  7. Pablo Gilabert & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Political Feasibility. A Conceptual Exploration. Political Studies 60 (4):809-825.
  8. Henning Hahn (2012). Justifying Feasibility Constraints on Human Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):143-157.
    It is a crucial question whether practicalities should have an impact in developing an applicable theory of human rights—and if, how (far) such constraints can be justified. In the course of the non-ideal turn of today’s political philosophy, any entitlements (and social entitlements in particular) stand under the proviso of practical feasibility. It would, after all, be unreasonable to demand something which is, under the given political and economic circumstances, unachievable. Thus, many theorist—particularly those belonging to the liberal camp—begin to (...)
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  9. Waheed Hussain (2009). The Most Stable Just Regime. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):412-433.
  10. Holly Lawford-Smith (2013). Understanding Political Feasibility. Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (3):243-259.
  11. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Feasibility of Collectives' Actions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (3):453-467.
    Does ?ought? imply ?can? for collectives' obligations? In this paper I want to establish two things. The first, what a collective obligation means for members of the collective. The second, how collective ability can be ascertained. I argue that there are four general kinds of obligation, which devolve from collectives to members in different ways, and I give an account of the distribution of obligation from collectives to members for each of these kinds. One implication of understanding collective obligation and (...)
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  12. Holly Lawford-Smith (2011). Cosmopolitan Global Justice: Brock Vs. The Feasibility Sceptic. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric (4).
  13. Holly Lawford-Smith (2010). Feasibility Constraints for Political Theories. Dissertation, Australian National University
  14. Hsin-wen Lee (forthcoming). Institutional Morality and the Principle of National Self-Determination. Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Allen Buchanan proposes a methodological framework with which theorists may evaluate different theories of secession, including the National Self-Determination theory. An important claim he makes is, because the right to secede is inherently institutional, any adequate theory of secession must include, as an integral part, an analysis of institutional morality. Because the National Self-Determination theory blatantly lacks such an analysis, Buchanan concludes that this theory is inherently flawed. In this paper, I consider Buchanan’s framework and the responses from supporters of (...)
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  15. Sune Lægaard (2006). Feasibility and Stability in Normative Political Philosophy: The Case of Liberal Nationalism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (4):399 - 416.
    Arguments from stability for liberal nationalism rely on considerations about conditions for the feasibility or stability of liberal political ideals and factual claims about the circumstances under which these conditions are fulfilled in order to argue for nationalist conclusions. Such reliance on factual claims has been criticised by among others G. A. Cohen in other contexts as ideological reifications of social reality. In order to assess whether arguments from stability within liberal nationalism, especially as formulated by David Miller, are (...)
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  16. Aaron Maltais (Early view). Failing International Climate Politics and the Fairness of Going First. Political Studies.
    There appear to be few ways available to improve the prospects for international cooperation to address the threat of global warming within the very short timeframe for action. I argue that the most effective and plausible way to break the ongoing pattern of delay in the international climate regime is for economically powerful states to take the lead domestically and demonstrate that economic welfare is compatible with rapidly decreasing GHG emissions. However, the costs and risks of acting first can be (...)
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  17. David Miller (2008). Political Philosophy for Earthlings. In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press. 29--48.
  18. J. Raikka (1998). The Feasibility Condition in Political Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (1):27-40.
  19. Marco Solinas (2009). Review of Richard Sennett, The Culture of the New Capitalism. [REVIEW] Humana.Mente 10:151-153.
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  20. Laura Valentini (2012). Ideal Vs. Non-Ideal Theory: A Conceptual Map. Philosophy Compass 7 (9):654-664.
  21. David Wiens, The Theory of Second Best: An Expository Note.
    I address two issues pertaining to the interpretation of the consequent of Lipsey and Lancaster's (1956) "general theory of second best". This note is a companion to my "Ideal Theory and the Theory of Second Best", which discusses issues pertaining to the theorem's antecedent.
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  22. David Wiens, Against Ideal Guidance.
    [Working paper] Political philosophers frequently claim that political ideal can provide normative guidance for unjust and otherwise nonideal circumstances. This is mistaken. This paper demonstrates that political ideals contribute nothing to our understanding of the normative principles we should implement amidst unjust or otherwise nonideal circumstances.
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  23. David Wiens (forthcoming). 'Going Evaluative' to Save Justice From Feasibility -- A Pyrrhic Victory. Philosophical Quarterly.
    I discuss Gheaus's (2013) argument against the claim that the requirements of justice are not constrained by feasibility concerns. I show that the general strategy exemplified by this argument is not only dialectically puzzling, but also imposes a heavy cost on theories of justice -- puzzling because it simply sidesteps a presupposition of any plausible formulation of the so-called "feasibility requirement"; costly because it it deprives justice of its normative implications for action. I also show that Gheaus's attempt to recover (...)
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  24. David Wiens (forthcoming). Political Ideals and the Feasibility Frontier. Economics and Philosophy.
    Recent methodological debates regarding the place of feasibility considerations in normative political theory are hindered for want of a rigorous model of the feasibility frontier. To address this shortfall, I present an analysis of feasibility that generalizes the economic concept of a production possibility frontier and then develop a rigorous model of the feasibility frontier using the familiar possible worlds technology. I then show that this model has significant methodological implications for political philosophy. On the Target View, a political ideal (...)
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  25. David Wiens (forthcoming). Achieving Global Justice: Why Failures Matter More Than Ideals. In Kate Brennan (ed.), Making Global Institutions Work: Power, Accountability and Change. Routledge.
    My aim in this paper is twofold. First, I challenge the view that ideal normative principles offer appropriate guidelines for our efforts to identify morally progressive institutional reform strategies. I shall call this view the "ideal guidance approach." Second, I develop an alternative methodological approach to specifying nonideal normative principles, which I call the "failure analysis approach." I contrast these alternatives using examples from the global justice literature.
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  26. David Wiens (2013). Demands of Justice, Feasible Alternatives, and the Need for Causal Analysis. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):325-338.
    Many political philosophers hold the Feasible Alternatives Principle (FAP): justice demands that we implement some reform of international institutions P only if P is feasible and P improves upon the status quo from the standpoint of justice. The FAP implies that any argument for a moral requirement to implement P must incorporate claims whose content pertains to the causal processes that explain the current state of affairs. Yet, philosophers routinely neglect the need to attend to actual causal processes. This undermines (...)
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  27. David Wiens (2012). Prescribing Institutions Without Ideal Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (1):45-70.
    It is conventional wisdom among political philosophers that ideal principles of justice (i.e., principles that would regulate the constitutions of fully just institutional arrangements) must guide our attempts to design institutions to avert actual injustice. Call this the ideal guidance approach. I argue that this view is misguided—ideal principles of justice are not appropriate "guiding principles" that actual institutions must aim to realize, even if only approximately. Fortunately, the conventional wisdom is also avoidable. In this paper, I develop an alternative (...)
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