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  1. Sybol Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology. Critical Horizons 13 (1):134 - 137.
    Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (eds), Recognition and Social Ontology Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 134-137 Authors Sybol Cook Anderson, St. Mary's College of Maryland, USA Journal Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy & Social Theory Online ISSN 1568-5160 Print ISSN 1440-9917 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / 2012.
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  2. Sybol Cook Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology (Leiden, EJ Brill, 2011), ISBN 978-90-04-20290-0 (Hbk), 398 Pp. US $182.00. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 13 (1):134-137.
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  3. A. Brinton (2012). Association and Recognition in Authoritarian Societies: A Theoretical Beginning. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (3):324-347.
    This paper presents a theoretical sketch for how the existence of civic associations in authoritarian regimes might be analysed. By relating the concepts of ‘civil society’ and ‘recognition’, I explore how associations are a potential locus of mutual recognition in any society, democratic or undemocratic. While there are many theorizations of both civil society and recognition in relation to democratic political contexts, normative theories seeking to explain the existence of associations in authoritarian societies are less robustly developed. Recognition, more specifically (...)
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  4. Dipesh Chakrabarty (2007). History and the Politics of Recognition. In Keith Jenkins, Sue Morgan & Alun Munslow (eds.), Manifestos for History. Routledge.
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  5. Francesco Chiesa & Enzo Rossi (forthcoming). Contested Identities and Spatial Marginalization: The Case of Roma and Gypsy-Travelers in Wales. In Stefano Moroni & David Weberman (eds.), Space and Pluralism.
    In this paper we analyse the connection between the contested ethno-cultural labelling of Gipsy-Travellers in Wales and their position of social marginalisation, with special reference to spatial issues, such as the provision of campsites and public housing. Our main aim is to show how the formal and informal (mis)labelling of minority groups leads to a number of morally and politically questionable outcomes in their treatment on the part of political authorities. Our approach combines a close reading of official policy documents, (...)
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  6. Julie Connolly (2010). Love in the Private: Axel Honneth, Feminism and the Politics of Recognition. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (4):414-433.
    Axel Honneth distinguishes between recognitive practices according to the social domain in which they occur and this allows him to theorise the relationship between power and recognition. 'Love-based recognition', which suggests the centrality of recognition to the relationships that nurture us in the first instance, is located in the family. Honneth argues that relationships encompassed by this category are pre-political, thereby repeating the distinction between the public and the private common to much political theory. This article explores the structure of (...)
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  7. Maeve Cooke (1997). Authenticity and Autonomy: Taylor, Habermas, and the Politics of Recognition. Political Theory 25 (2):258-288.
  8. Rosemary J. Coombe (1993). Tactics of Appropriation and the Politics of Recognition in Late Modern Democracies. Political Theory 21 (3):411-433.
  9. Glen S. Coulthard (2007). Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the |[Lsquo]|Politics of Recognition|[Rsquo]| in Canada. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437.
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  10. Ruth Cox (2010). Simon Thompson, The Political Theory of Recognition: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge: Polity, 2006), Paperback, Isbn 9780745627625, 256 Pages, $22.95/£16.99/A$55.95. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 8 (1).
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  11. Simon Cushing, Reaching for My Gun: Why We Shouldn't Hear the Word "Culture" in Normative Political Theory. 1st Global Conference: Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging.
    Culture is a notoriously elusive concept. This fact has done nothing to hinder its popularity in contemporary analytic political philosophy among writers like John Rawls, Will Kymlicka, Michael Walzer, David Miller, Iris Marion Young, Joseph Raz, Avishai Margalit and Bikhu Parekh, among many others. However, this should stop, both for the metaphysical reason that the concept of culture, like that of race, is itself either incoherent or lacking a referent in reality, and for several normative reasons. I focus on the (...)
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  12. Kevin S. Decker (2012). Perspectives and Ideologies: A Pragmatic Use for Recognition Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (2):215-226.
    ‘Recognition’ is a normative concept denoting the ascription of positive status to a group or an individual by (an) other(s). In its larger meaning, it carries the implication that when a group or an individual can justifiably expect such a positive status-ascription, its denial (misrecognition) is unjustified and unethical. I discuss the role that the concept of recognition can play at the intersection of two philosophies, pragmatism and contemporary critical theory. My perspective is one that embraces the ‘pragmatic turn’ in (...)
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  13. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2006). Repressed Materiality: Retrieving the Materialism in Axel Honneth's Theory of Recognition. Critical Horizons 7 (1):113-140.
    The origins of Axel Honneth's theory of recognition lie in his earlier project to correct the conceptual confusions and empirical shortcomings of historical materialism for the purpose of an adequate post-Habermasian critical social theory. Honneth proposed to accomplish this project, most strikingly, by reconnecting critical social theory with one of its repressed philosophical sources, namely anthropological materialism. In its mature shape, however, recognition theory operates on a narrow concept of interaction, which seems to lose sight of the material mediations with (...)
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  14. Linda Timmel Duchamp (1988). Desperately Seeking Approval: The Importance of Distinguishing Between Approval and Recognition. Hypatia 3 (2):163 - 164.
    Victoria Davion confuses seeking approval with the desire for recognition of and respect for one's difference. Ironically, when she asserts that the desire to please others provides an incentive to do well (and thus constitutes a positive aspect of competition) Davion undermines her argument that competition enhances one's sense of self. Rather than enhancing one's sense of self, striving to win approval from others sabotages one's ability to rely on her own judgment and take moral responsibility for herself.
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  15. Carolin Emcke (2000). Between Choice and Coercion: Identities, Injuries, and Different Forms of Recognition. Constellations 7 (4):483-495.
  16. Matt Ferkany (2009). Recognition, Attachment, and the Social Bases of Self-Worth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (3):263-283.
    Recognition theorists have claimed that a culturally egalitarian societal environment is a crucial social basis of a sense of self-worth. In doing so they have often drawn on noncogntivist social-psychological theorizing. This paper argues that this theorizing does not support the recognition theorist's position. It is argued that attachment theory, together with recent empirical evidence, support a more limited vision of self-worth's social bases according to which associational ties, basic rights and liberties, and economic and educational opportunity are what really (...)
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  17. Estelle Ferrarese (2009). &Quot;gabba-Gabba, We Accept You, One of Us&Quot;: Vulnerability and Power in the Relationship of Recognition. Constellations 16 (4):604-614.
    No Current Hegelian theories of recognition assume a concept of the subject as always being available for harming. This emphasis placed on vulnerability, whose validity is not being called into question as such here, leave a certain number of elements on the nature of the harm threatening the person expecting recognition unclarified, especially the fact that it cannot be perpetrated without the victim being aware. At the same time, it fails to address the nature of the relationship of recognition, omitting (...)
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  18. Rainer Forst (2007). First Things First Redistribution, Recognition and Justification. European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):291-304.
    This article analyses the debate between Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth in a dialectical fashion. Their controversy about how to construct a critical theory of justice is not just one about the proper balance between `redistribution' and `recognition', it also involves basic questions of social ontology. Differing both from Fraser's `twodimensional' view of `participatory parity' and from Honneth's `monistic' theory of recognition, the article argues for a third view of `justificatory monism and diagnosticevaluative pluralism', also called the `first-things-first' approach. According (...)
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  19. Nancy Fraser (2005). Mapping the Feminist Imagination:From Redistribution to Recognition to Representation. Constellations 12 (3):295-307.
  20. Nancy Fraser (2000). Why Overcoming Prejudice is Not Enough: A Rejoinder to Richard Rorty. Critical Horizons 1 (1):21-28.
    Misrecognition, taken seriously as unjust social subordination, cannot be remedied by eliminating prejudice alone. In this rejoinder to Richard Rorty, it is argued that a politics of recognition and a politics of redistribution can and should be combined. However, an identity politics that displaces redistribution and reifies group differences is deeply flawed. Here, instead, an alternative 'status' model of recognition politics is offered that encourages struggles to overcome status subordination and fosters parity of participation. Integrating this politics of recognition with (...)
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  21. Lauren Freeman (2009). Recognition Reconsidered: A Re-Reading of Heidegger’s Being and Time §26. Philosophy Today 53 (1):85-89.
    This article argues that notwithstanding Martin Heidegger’s explicit intentions to the contrary, his existential analysis in Being and Time provides more than the mere conditions for the possibility of ethics. More specifically, Heidegger’s account of solicitude, where he distinguishes between leaping in for and leaping ahead of the other, can be read as an account of recognition that has normative implications. This account is developed in light of both Charles Taylor and Axel Honneth’s positions on recognition. It is concluded that (...)
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  22. Fuat Gursozlu (2013). The Multicultural Mystique: The Liberal Case Against Diversity, by H. E. Baber. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):300-303.
  23. Matthew Hann (2011). Rights, Race, and Recognition. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (1):129.
  24. Ejvind Hansen (2010). Recognition as a Reference Point for a Concept of Progress in Critical Theory. Critical Horizons 10 (1):99-117.
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  25. Mark Hardy (2013). Equality and Diversity: Value Incommensurability and the Politics of Recognition. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):104-106.
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  26. Benjamin Harrison & Roger Fuller (forthcoming). Recognition and Redistribution. Critical Review.
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  27. Volker Heins (2010). Of Persons and Peoples: Internationalizing the Critical Theory of Recognition. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (2):149.
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  28. Volker Heins (2009). The Place of Property in the Politics of Recognition. Constellations 16 (4):579-592.
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  29. Axel Honneth (2006). The Work of Negativity - a Psychoanalytical Revision of the Theory of Recognition. Critical Horizons 7 (1):101-111.
    This paper pursues two questions derived from psychoanalysis that are central to the theory of recognition: must the image or force of negativity classically derived from Freud necessarily be thought of as an elementary component of human beings equipped with drives? Or, can this image or force of negativity be conceptualised as an unavoidable result of the unfolding processes of internalised socialisation? The first question is pursued in a consideration of its legacy for the older representatives of the Frankfurt School, (...)
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  30. Axel Honneth (2001). Recognition: Invisibility: On the Epistemology of 'Recognition': Axel Honneth. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):111–126.
  31. Axel Honneth (1992). Integrity and Disrespect: Principles of a Conception of Morality Based on the Theory of Recognition. Political Theory 20 (2):187-201.
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  32. Axel Honneth & Titus Stahl (2013). Wandel der Anerkennung. Überlegungen Aus Gerechtigkeitstheoretischer Perspektive. In Axel Honneth, Ophelia Lindemann & Stephan Voswinkel (eds.), Strukturwandel der Anerkennung. Campus.
    How are changes in the social order of recognition to be evaluated normatively? We argue that the conventional means of liberal philosophical theories of justice are insufficient to answer this question. This is for three reasons: First, relations of recognition are neither basic rights nor distributable goods, but rather constitutive for the meaning of those rights and goods which constitute the object domain of distributive theories of justice. Second, relations of recognition provide the framework for many questions of justice, outside (...)
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  33. Kimberly Hutchings (2002). Retrieving Experience: Subjectivity and Recognition in Feminist Politics. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (2):250.
  34. Heikki Ikäheimo (2009). A Vital Human Need Recognition as Inclusion in Personhood. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (1):31-45.
    Why is recognition of such an importance for humans? Why should lack of recognition motivate people to fight or work for recognition? In this article, I first discuss shortly Axel Honneth's somewhat psychologizing strategy for answering these questions, and suggest that the psychological harms of lack of recognition pointed out by Honneth are neither sufficient nor necessary for motivation to fight or work for recognition to arise. According to the alternative that I then spell out, recognition and lack of it (...)
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  35. Levent Köker (1996). Political Toleration or Politics of Recognition: The Headscarves Affair Revisited. Political Theory 24 (2):315-320.
  36. Nikolas Kompridis (2007). Struggling Over the Meaning of Recognition A Matter of Identity, Justice, or Freedom? European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):277-289.
    Struggles for recognition are at the same time struggles over what it means to recognize and be recognized. Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth propose two mutually exclusive ways to understand recognition: either as a matter of justice (Fraser) or as a matter of identity (Honneth). This article argues against the limitations of both of these construals of recognition, and offers a third way of construing it: as a matter of freedom. Recognition is not reducible, empirically or normatively, to any of (...)
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  37. Arto Laitinen (2009). Recognition, Needs and Wrongness Two Approaches. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (1):13-30.
    `Due recognition is a vital human need', argues Charles Taylor. In this article I explore this oft-quoted claim from two complementary and equally appealing perspectives. The bottom—up approach is constructed around Axel Honneth's theory of recognition, and the top—down approach is exemplified by T. M. Scanlon's brief remarks about mutual recognition. The former can be summed up in the slogan `wronging by misrecognizing', the latter in the slogan `misrecognizing by wronging'. Together they provide two complementary readings of the claim that (...)
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  38. Arto Laitinen (2002). Interpersonal Recognition: A Response to Value or a Precondition of Personhood? Inquiry 45 (4):463 – 478.
    This article suggests first that the concept of interpersonal recognition be understood in a multidimensional (as opposed to one-dimensional), practical (as opposed to symbolic), and strict (as opposed to broad) way. Second, it is argued that due recognition be seen as a reason-governed response to evaluative features, rather than all normativity and reasons being seen as generated by recognition. This can be called a response-model, or, more precisely, a value-based model of due recognition. A further suggestion is that there is (...)
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  39. Bruce M. Landesman (1994). Book Review:Multiculturalism and "The Politics of Recognition." Charles Taylor, Amy Gutmann. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (2):384-.
  40. Christopher Lauer (2012). Multivalent Recognition: The Place of Hegel in the Fraser|[Ndash]|Honneth Debate. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (1):23.
  41. Matthew Lister (forthcoming). Review of Corvino and Gallagher, Debating Same-Sex Marriage. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy.
    With the recent U.S. Supreme Court cases finding the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional and removing impediments to same-sex marriage in California,as well as a number of recent successes in special elections and with legislators inthe U.S. and other countries, we might wonder whether there is still need for a book debating same-sex marriage. Is not the tide of history inevitably movingtowards marriage equality? While that position seems tempting, it is too quick.
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  42. Brenda Lyshaug (2004). Authenticity and the Politics of Identity: A Critique of Charles Taylor's Politics of Recognition. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):300.
  43. Alice MacLachlan (2013). Government Apologies to Indigenous Peoples. In C. Allen Speight & Alice MacLachlan (eds.), Justice, Responsibility and Reconciliation in the Wake of Conflict. Springer. 183-204.
    In this paper, I explore how theorists might navigate a course between the twin dangers of piety and excess cynicism when thinking critically about state apologies, by focusing on two government apologies to indigenous peoples: namely, those made by the Australian and Canadian Prime Ministers in 2008. Both apologies are notable for several reasons: they were both issued by heads of government, and spoken on record within the space of government: the national parliaments of both countries. Furthermore, in each case, (...)
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  44. Alice MacLachlan (2010). The State of 'Sorry': Official Apologies and Their Absence. [REVIEW] Journal of Human Rights 9 (3):373-385.
  45. Jack Montgomery (forthcoming). The Apology of a Moss-Trooper:(How) Is" Walking" Political? The Personalist Forum.
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  46. Monica Mookherjee (2005). Affective Citizenship: Feminism, Postcolonialism and the Politics of Recognition. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (1):31-50.
    A serious problem confronting discourses on recognition is that of showing equal respect for citizens? diverse cultural identities whilst at the same time attending to feminist concerns. This article focuses on the complex issues emerging from the recent legislation prohibiting the Muslim veil in French state schools. I respond to these problems by defending two conditions of a postcolonial and feminist approach to the politics of recognition. This approach should be, first, transformative, in the sense of widening its conception of (...)
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  47. Anna Mudde (2009). Risky Subjectivity: Antigone, Action, and Universal Trespass. Human Studies 32 (2):183 - 200.
    In this paper, I draw on the mutually implicated structures of tragedy and self-formation found in Hegel’s use of Sophocles’ Antigone in the Phenomenology. By emphasizing the apparent distinction between particular and universal in Hegel’s reading of the tragedies in Antigone, I propose that a tragedy of action (which particularizes a universal) is inescapable for subjectivity understood as socially constituted and always already socially engaged. I consider universal/particular relations in three communities: Hegel’s Greek polis, his community of conscience, and my (...)
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  48. Alejandro Anaya Muñoz (2005). Democratic Equality and Indigenous Electoral Institutions in Oaxaca, Mexico: Addressing the Perils of a Politics of Recognition. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):327-347.
    Abstract In 1995, the constitution of the Mexican state of Oaxaca was reformed to recognise indigenous usages and customs for the election of municipal governments. This recognition is problematic from a normative perspective, as women, new?comers and dwellers in municipal sub?units are disenfranchised in a good number of indigenous municipalities of the state. Nevertheless, this article argues against a summary assessment of the (presumably illiberal) consequences of this recognition policy. Following James Tully, it advocates an intercultural, dialogical and inclusive procedure (...)
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  49. Chris Naticchia (1999). Recognition and Legitimacy: A Reply to Buchanan. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (3):242–257.
  50. Linda Nicholson (1996). Identity and the Politics of Recognition. Constellations 3 (1):1-16.
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