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  1. Edward Butler (2012). Essays on a Polytheistic Philosophy of Religion. Phaidra Editions.
    These essays lay the groundwork for a practice of philosophical inquiry adequate to polytheistic or "Pagan" religious traditions, including in particular the non-reductive hermeneutics of myth and the theory of the polycentric divine manifold. Includes the previously published articles "The Theological Interpretation of Myth" and "Polycentric Polytheism and the Philosophy of Religion", as well as the previously unpublished essays "Neoplatonism and Polytheism" and "A Theological Exegesis of the Iliad, Book One".
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  2. Edward P. Butler (2010). The Second Intelligible Triad and the Intelligible-Intellective Gods. Méthexis 23:137-157.
    Continuing the systematic henadological interpretation of Proclus' Platonic Theology begun in "The Intelligible Gods in the Platonic Theology of Proclus" (Methexis 21, 2008, pp. 131-143), the present article treats of the basic characteristics of intelligible-intellective (or noetico-noeric) multiplicity and its roots in henadic individuality. Intelligible-intellective multiplicity (the hypostasis of Life) is at once a universal organization of Being in its own right, and also transitional between the polycentric henadic manifold, in which each individual is immediately productive of absolute Being, and (...)
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  3. F. M. Cornford (1938). The "Polytheism" of Plato: An Apology. Mind 47 (187):321-330.
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  4. Charles Crittenden (1997). In Support of Paganism: Polytheism as Earth–Based Religion. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):34-60.
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  5. Russell Ford (2004). Klossowski's Polytheism. Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 14 (2):75-81.
  6. R. Harwood (1999). Polytheism, Pantheism, and the Ontological Argument. Religious Studies 35 (4):477-491.
    I show that if the ontological argument is sound, it proves that a number of maximally great beings must exist. I show that maximal greatness does not imply uniqueness, that such beings can be omnipotent and yet not restrict each other's power, and that each must have its own separate stream of consciousness. I also show that attempts to unify the beings by unifying the streams of consciousness leads to a form of pantheism.
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  7. Pierre Klossowski (2004). Nietzsche, Polytheism and Parody. Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 14 (2):82-119.
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  8. Brian Leftow (1988). Anselmian Polytheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (2):77 - 104.
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  9. Jon D. Mikalson (2007). Parker (R.) Polytheism and Society at Athens. Pp. Xxxii + 544, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-19-927483-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (01):147-.
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  10. Peter Schmiedgen (2005). Polytheism, Monotheism and Public Space: Between Levinas and Arendt. Critical Horizons 6 (1):225-237.
    In this paper I argue that the Levinasian opposition between the violence of the production of identity and self-presence and its undermining in a charitable disburdening of the self for the sake of the monotheistic ethical other, is unable to provide all the resources required for a politically motivated critique of the present. As a critique of Levinas' almost Manichean opposition between identity and difference, I argue, by appealing to the Arendtian model of public space, that Levinas underestimates our capacity (...)
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  11. Julia L. Shear (2007). History (R.) Parker Polytheism and Society at Athens. Oxford UP, 2005. Pp. Xxxii + 544, Illus. £65, 0199274835 (Hbk); £27.50, 0199216118 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:191-.
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  12. Eric Steinhart (2014). Your Digital Afterlives: Computational Theories of Life After Death. Palgrave.
    Our digital technologies have inspired new ways of thinking about old religious topics. Digitalists include computer scientists, transhumanists, singularitarians, and futurists. Digitalists have worked out novel and entirely naturalistic ways of thinking about bodies, minds, souls, universes, gods, and life after death. Your Digital Afterlives starts with three digitalist theories of life after death. It examines personality capture, body uploading, and promotion to higher levels of simulation. It then examines the idea that reality itself is ultimately a system of self-surpassing (...)
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  13. Eric Steinhart (2013). On the Plurality of Gods. Religious Studies 49 (3):289-312.
    Ordinal polytheism is motivated by the cosmological and design arguments. It is also motivated by Leibnizian–Lewisian modal realism. Just as there are many universes, so there are many gods. Gods are necessary concrete grounds of universes. The god-universe relation is one-to-one. Ordinal polytheism argues for a hierarchy of ranks of ever more perfect gods, one rank for every ordinal number. Since there are no maximally perfect gods, ordinal polytheism avoids many of the familiar problems of monotheism. It links theology with (...)
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  14. Eric Steinhart (2012). On the Number of Gods. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (2):75-83.
    A god is a cosmic designer-creator. Atheism says the number of gods is 0. But it is hard to defeat the minimal thesis that some possible universe is actualized by some possible god. Monotheists say the number of gods is 1. Yet no degree of perfection can be coherently assigned to any unique god. Lewis says the number of gods is at least the second beth number. Yet polytheists cannot defend an arbitrary plural number of gods. An alternative is that, (...)
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  15. A. E. Taylor (1938). The "Polytheism" of Plato: An Apologia. Mind 47 (186):180-199.
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  16. Edward Wierenga (2004). Trinity and Polytheism. Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):281-294.
    This paper develops an interpretation of the doctrine of the Trinity, drawn from Augustine and the Athanasian Creed. Such a doctrine includes divinity claims (the persons are divine), diversity claims (the persons are distinct), and a uniqueness claim (there is only one God). I propose and defend an interpretation of these theses according to which they are neither logically incompatible nor do they do entail that there are three (or four) gods.
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