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  1. Laura Ahonen & Home Studio Aesthetics : Tracking Cultural Processes of Popular Music Production (2006). Music and Technology. Virtuality and Metadesign : Sound Art in the Age of Connectivity / Paulo C. Chagas ; "When New Media Was the Big Idea" : Internet and the Rethinking of Pop-Music Languages / Gianni Sibilla ; Mediated Stardom, Constructed Images : The Value and Functioning of Authorship in Popular Music. In Erkki Pekkilä, David Neumeyer & Richard Littlefield (eds.), Music, Meaning and Media. University of Helsinki.
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  2. Nora M. Alter & Lutz P. Koepnick (eds.) (2004). Sound Matters: Essays on the Acoustics of Modern German Culture. Berghahn Books.
    ... composed by Herms Niel as a Durchhaltefanfare, a fanfare of perseverance, for the German troops that had been surrounded on the Crimea peninsula by ...
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  3. Christopher Bartel (2008). Listening to Popular Music. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):357-359.
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  4. Lee B. Brown (2000). Phonography, Rock Records, and the Ontology of Recorded Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (4):361-372.
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  5. Stephen Davies (2003). I Wanna Be Me: Rock Music and the Politics of Identity. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):199-201.
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  6. Stephen Davies (1999). Rock Versus Classical Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):193-204.
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  7. Robin James (2013). Race and the Feminized Popular in Nietzsche and Beyond. Hypatia 28 (4):749-766.
    I distinguish between the nineteenth- to twentieth-century (modernist) tendency to rehabilitate (white) femininity from the abject popular, and the twentieth- to twenty-first-century (postmodernist) tendency to rehabilitate the popular from abject white femininity. Careful attention to the role of nineteenth-century racial politics in Nietzsche's Gay Science shows that his work uses racial nonwhiteness to counter the supposedly deleterious effects of (white) femininity (passivity, conformity, and so on). This move—using racial nonwhiteness to rescue pop culture from white femininity—is a common twentieth- and (...)
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  8. Robin James (2011). On Intersectionality and Cultural Appropriation: The Case of Postmillennial Black Hipness. Journal of Black Masculinity 1 (2).
    Feminist, critical race, and postcolonial theories have established that social identities such as race and gender are mutually constitutive—i.e., that they “intersect.” I argue that “cultural appropriation” is never merely the appropriation of culture, but also of gender, sexuality, class, etc. For example, “white hipness” is the appropriation of stereotypical black masculinity by white males. Looking at recent videos from black male hip-hop artists, I develop an account of “postmillennial black hipness.” The inverse of white hipness, this practice involves the (...)
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  9. Robin James (2011). &Quot;feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'&Quot;. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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  10. Robin James (2009). In but Not of, of but Not In: On Taste, Hipness, and White Embodiment. Contemporary Aesthetics 2 (Aesthetics and Race).
    The status of the body figures paradoxically in the interrelated discourses of whiteness, aesthetic taste, and hipness. While Richard Dyer’s analysis of whiteness argues that white identity is “in but not of the body,” Carolyn Korsmeyer’s and Julia Kristeva’s feminist analyses of aesthetic “taste” demonstrate that this faculty is traditionally conceived as something “of” but not “in” the body. While taste directly distances whiteness from embodiment, hipness negatively affirms this same distance: the hipster proves his elite status within white culture (...)
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  11. Robin M. James (2009). &Quot;autonomy, Universaltiy, and Playing the Guitar: On the Politics and Aesthetics of Contemporary Feminist Deployments of the 'Master's Tools'&Quot;. Hypatia 24 (4):77-100.
    Some feminists have argued that the “master's tools” cannot be utilized for feminist projects. When read through the lens of non-ideal theory, Judith Butler's reevaluation of “autonomy” and “universality” and Peaches's engagement with guitar rock are instances in which implements of patriarchy are productively repurposed for feminist ends. These examples evince two criteria whereby one can judge the success of such an attempt: first, accessibility and efficacy; second, that the use is deconstructive of its own conditions.
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  12. Robin M. James (2007). Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music. CR 7 (1):45-80.
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
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  13. Andrew Kania (2009). Musical Recordings. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):22-38.
    In this article, I first consider the metaphysics of musical recordings: their variety, repeatability, and transparency. I then turn to evaluative or aesthetic issues, such as the relative virtues of recordings and live performances, in light of the metaphysical discussion.
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  14. Andrew Kania (2006). Making Tracks: The Ontology of Rock Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):401–414.
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  15. Judith Irene Lochhead & Joseph Henry Auner (eds.) (2002). Postmodern Music/Postmodern Thought. Routledge.
    What is postmodern music and how does it differ from earlier styles, including modernist music? What roles have electronic technologies and sound production played in defining postmodern music? Has postmodern music blurred the lines between high and popular music? Addressing these and other questions, this ground-breaking collection gathers together for the first time essays on postmodernism and music written primarily by musicologists, covering a wide range of musical styles including concert music, jazz, film music, and popular music. Topics include: the (...)
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  16. P. D. Magnus, Cristyn Magnus & Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Judging Covers. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):361-370.
    Cover versions form a loose but identifiable category of tracks and performances. We distinguish four kinds of covers and argue that they mark important differences in the modes of evaluation that are possible or appropriate for each: mimic covers, which aim merely to echo the canonical track; rendition covers, which change the sound of the canonical track; transformative covers, which diverge so much as to instantiate a distinct, albeit derivative song; and referential covers, which not only instantiate a distinct song, (...)
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  17. Rafe Mcgregor (2012). Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):319-321.
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  18. Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.) (2004). Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.
    Why are some popular musical forms and performers universally reviled by critics and ignored by scholars-despite enjoying large-scale popularity? How has the notion of what makes "good" or "bad" music changed over the years-and what does this tell us about the writers who have assigned these tags to different musical genres? Many composers that are today part of the classical "canon" were greeted initially by bad reviews. Similarly, jazz, country, and pop musics were all once rejected as "bad" by the (...)
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