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  1. Mark B. Adams (1970). Towards a Synthesis: Population Concepts in Russian Evolutionary Thought, 1925-1935. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 3 (1):107 - 129.
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  2. Matthew J. Barker & Joel D. Velasco (2014). Deep Conventionalism About Evolutionary Groups. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):971-982.
    We reject a widespread objectivism about kinds of evolutionary groups in favor of a new conventionalism. Surprisingly, being any one kind of evolutionary group typically depends on which of many incompatible values are taken by suppressed variables. This novel pluralism underlies almost any single evolutionary group concept, unlike familiar pluralisms claiming that multiple concepts of certain sorts are legitimate. Consequently, we must help objective facts determine which candidate evolutionary groups satisfy the definition of a given evolutionary group concept, regardless of (...)
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  3. Ángel Blasco, Luis Sanz, Pierre Auger & Rafael Bravo de la Parra (2002). Linear Discrete Population Models with Two Time Scales in Fast Changing Environments II: Non-Autonomous Case. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (1).
    As the result of the complexity inherent in nature, mathematical models employed in ecology are often governed by a large number of variables. For instance, in the study of population dynamics we often deal with models for structured populations in which individuals are classified regarding their age, size, activity or location, and this structuring of the population leads to high dimensional systems. In many instances, the dynamics of the system is controlled by processes whose time scales are very different from (...)
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  4. Ángel Blasco, Luis Sanz, Pierre Auger & Rafael Bravo de la Parra (2001). Linear Discrete Population Models with Two Time Scales in Fast Changing Environments I: Autonomous Case. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (4).
    In this work we consider a structured population with groups and subgroups of individuals. The intra-group dynamics is assumed to be fast in comparison with the inter-group dynamics. We study linear discrete models where the slow dynamics is represented by a single matrix and the fast dynamics is described by means of the first k terms of a converging sequence of different matrices. The number k can be interpreted as the ratio between the two time scales.The aim of this work (...)
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  5. F. S. Bodenheimer & M. Schiffer (1952). Mathematical Studies in Animal Populations. Acta Biotheoretica 10 (1-2).
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  6. Valère Calaud & Yvan Lagadeuc (2005). Structural Stability of a Stage Structured Model of Fish: The Case of the Anchovy (Engraulis Encrasicolus L.) in the Bay of Biscay. Acta Biotheoretica 53 (4).
    A study of stage structured model of fish population is presented. This model focuse on the anchovy population in the Bay of Biscay (Engraulis encrasicolus L.) is presented. The method of study is based on an intermediate complexity mathematical model, taking into account the spatialisation, the environmental conditions and the stage-structure of the fishes. First, to test the model, we show mathematical properties, such as unicity of the solution of structural stability. Then we provide numerical simulations, to validate the model (...)
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  7. Tom Campbell, Daria Osipova & Seppo Kähkönen (2006). Finland's Galapagos: Founder Effect, Drift, and Isolation in the Inheritance of Susceptibility Alleles. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):409-410.
    The target article excludes ancestral neutrality as a cause for the inheritance of schizophrenia, with an argument relating to selection against a single allele in the Finnish population. However, drift would predominate over selection within subisolates of the Finnish population. Comparisons of subisolates with heterogeneous populations may provide clues to the endophenotypic structure of complex polygenetic heritable mental disorders. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  8. Mauricio Canals, Ramiro O. Bustamante, Mildred H. Ehrenfeld & Pedro E. Cattan (1998). Assessing the Impact of Disease Vectors on Animal Populations. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (4).
    Many studies have attempted to assess the relative effects of different vectors of a disease on animal populations. To this end, three measures have been proposed: Vectorial efficiency, Vectorial capacity and recently Vectorial effectiveness (or Vectorial impact). In this study we relate these measures to derive some of their properties emphasising in the vectorial impact for its importance in both, population performance of parasites and the proportion of the prevalence of one parasite due to a given vector. We applied the (...)
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  9. Jorge Paulo Cancela & Kimon Hadjibiros (1977). Le Modele Matriciel Deterministe de Leslie Et Ses Applications En Dynamique Des Populations. Acta Biotheoretica 26 (4).
    The Leslie matrix model (Leslie, 1945) for discrete population growth has been modified and used several times in population dynamics. A review is given of the basic model (n t + 1 = An t) and of its principal modifications. The modifications relating to the influences of internal or external factors to the population are studied with greater detail. The same applies to models where the population is divided in stages rather than in age classes.In the same line, Hadjibiros (1975, (...)
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  10. Marvin Chester (2012). A Fundamental Principle Governing Populations. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (3):289-302.
    Proposed here is that an overriding principle of nature governs all population behavior; that a single tenet drives the many regimes observed in nature—exponential-like growth, saturated growth, population decline, population extinction, and oscillatory behavior. The signature of such an all embracing principle is a differential equation which, in a single statement, embraces the entire panoply of observations. In current orthodox theory, this diverse range of population behaviors is described by many different equations—each with its own specific justification. Here, a single (...)
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  11. Th Dobzhansky (1935). A Critique of the Species Concept in Biology. Philosophy of Science 2 (3):344-355.
  12. Frank N. Egerton (1970). Humboldt, Darwin, and Population. Journal of the History of Biology 3 (2):325 - 360.
    I have attempted to clarify some of the pathways in the development of Darwin's thinking. The foregoing examples of influence by no means include all that can be found by comparing Darwin's writings with Humboldt's. However, the above examples seem adequate to show the nature and extent of this influence. It now seems clear that Humboldt not only, as had been previously known, inspired Darwin to make a voyage of exploration, but also provided him with his basic orientation concerning how (...)
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  13. Frank N. Egerton (1968). Studies of Animal Populations From Lamarck to Darwin. Journal of the History of Biology 1 (2):225 - 259.
    Darwin's theory of evolution brought to an end the static view of nature. It was no longer possible to think of species as immortal, with secure places in nature. Fluctuation of population could no longer be thought of as occurring within definite limits which had been set at the time of creation. Nor was it any longer possible to generalize from the differential reproductive potentials, or from a few cases of mutualism between species, that everything in nature was “fitted to (...)
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  14. L. H. M. Jonckers (1973). The Concept of Population in Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 22 (2).
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  15. Jonathan Kaplan & Massimo Pigliucci (2003). On the Concept of Biological Race and its Applicability to Humans. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):S294-S304.
    Biological research on race has often been seen as motivated by or lending credence to underlying racist attitudes; in part for this reason, recently philosophers and biologists have gone through great pains to essentially deny the existence of biological human races. We argue that human races, in the biological sense of local populations adapted to particular environments, do in fact exist; such races are best understood through the common ecological concept of ecotypes. However, human ecotypic races do not in general (...)
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  16. Roberta L. Millstein (2010). Should We Be Population Pluralists? A Reply to Stegenga. Biological Theory 5 (3):271-276.
    In “‘Population’ is Not a Natural Kind of Kinds,” Jacob Stegenga argues against the claim that the concept of “population” is a natural kind and in favor of conceptual pluralism, ostensibly in response to two papers of mine (Millstein 2009, 2010). Pluralism is often an attractive position in the philosophy of science. It certainly is a live possibility for the concept of population in ecology and evolutionary biology, and I welcome the opportunity to discuss the topic further. However, I argue (...)
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  17. Roberta L. Millstein (2010). Jacob Stegenga-–"“Population"” Is Not a Natural Kind of Kinds. Biological Theory 5 (3):271.
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  18. Roberta L. Millstein (2010). The Concepts of Population and Metapopulation in Evolutionary Biology and Ecology. In M. A. Bell, D. J. Futuyma, W. F. Eanes & J. S. Levinton (eds.), Evolution Since Darwin: The First 150 Years. Sinauer.
    This paper aims to illustrate one of the primary goals of the philosophy of biology⎯namely, the examination of central concepts in biological theory and practice⎯through an analysis of the concepts of population and metapopulation in evolutionary biology and ecology. I will first provide a brief background for my analysis, followed by a characterization of my proposed concepts: the causal interactionist concepts of population and metapopulation. I will then illustrate how the concepts apply to six cases that differ in their population (...)
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  19. Roberta L. Millstein (2009). Populations as Individuals. Biological Theory 4 (3):267-273.
    Biologists studying ecology and evolution use the term “population” in many different ways. Yet little philosophical analysis of the concept has been done, either by biologists or philosophers, in contrast to the voluminous literature on the concept of “species.” This is in spite of the fact that “population” is arguably a far more central concept in ecological and evolutionary studies than “species” is. The fact that such a central concept has been employed in so many different ways is potentially problematic (...)
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  20. Jacob Stegenga (2010). &Quot;population" Is Not a Natural Kind of Kinds. Biological Theory 5 (2):154–160.
    Millstein (2009) argues against conceptual pluralism with respect to the definition of “population,” and proposes her own definition of the term. I challenge both Millstein’s negative arguments against conceptual pluralism and her positive proposal for a singular definition of population. The concept of population, I argue, does not refer to a natural kind; populations are constructs of biologists variably defined by contexts of inquiry.
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  21. Joel Velasco (2013). Phylogeny as Population History. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 5 (20130604).
    The project of this paper is to understand what a phylogenetic tree represents and to discuss some of the implications that this has for the practice of systematics. At least the first part of this task, if not both parts, might appear trivial—or perhaps better suited for a single page in a textbook rather than a scholarly research paper. But this would be a mistake. While the task of interpreting phylogenetic trees is often treated in a trivial way, their interpretation (...)
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  22. Francisco Vergara-Silva & Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2009). Editorial: Systematics, Darwinism, and the Philosophy of Science. Acta Biotheoretica 57:1-3.
  23. Mary Pickard Winsor (2000). Species, Demes, and the Omega Taxonomy: Gilmour and the Newsystematics. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):349-388.
    The word ``deme'' was coined by the botanists J.S.L. Gilmour and J.W.Gregor in 1939, following the pattern of J.S. Huxley's ``cline''. Its purposewas not only to rationalize the plethora of terms describing chromosomaland genetic variation, but also to reduce hostility between traditionaltaxonomists and researchers on evolution, who sometimes scorned eachother's understanding of species. A multi-layered system of compoundterms based on deme was published by Gilmour and J. Heslop-Harrison in1954 but not widely used. Deme was adopted with a modified meaning byzoologists (...)
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