This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
102 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 102
Pascal's Wager
  1. Robert P. Amico (1994). Pascal's Wager Revisited. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):1-11.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Anderson (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God - by Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49 (1):94-96.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Robert Anderson (1995). Recent Criticisms and Defenses of Pascal's Wager. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 37 (1):45 - 56.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Bradley Armour-Garb (1999). Betting on God: Why Considerations of Simplicity Won't Help. Religious Studies 35 (2):119-138.
    In his famous Wager, Blaise Pascal attempted to adduce prudential grounds on which to base a belief in God. His argument founders, however, on the notorious 'Many Gods Problem', the problem of selecting among the many equiprobable gods on offer. Lycan and Schlesinger try to treat the Many Gods Problem as a problem of empirical over-determination, attempting to overcome it using methodologies familiar from empirical science. I argue that their strategy fails, but that the Many Gods Problem can be solved (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Antony Aumann (2014). On the Validity of Pascal's Wager. Heythrop Journal 55 (1):86-93.
    Recent scholarship has shown that the success of Pascal’s wager rests on precarious grounds. To avoid notorious problems, it must appeal to considerations such as what probability we assign to the existence of various gods and what religion we think provides the greatest happiness in this life. Rational judgments concerning these matters are subject to change over time. Some claim that the wager therefore cannot support a steadfast commitment to God. I argue that this conclusion does not follow. By drawing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Paul Bartha (2012). Pascal's Wager Meets the Replicator Dynamics. In Jake Chandler Victoria S. Harrison (ed.), Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford. 187.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Paul Bartha (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God – Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):571–574.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul Bartha (2007). Taking Stock of Infinite Value: Pascal's Wager and Relative Utilities. Synthese 154 (1):5 - 52.
    Among recent objections to Pascal’s Wager, two are especially compelling. The first is that decision theory, and specifically the requirement of maximizing expected utility, is incompatible with infinite utility values. The second is that even if infinite utility values are admitted, the argument of the Wager is invalid provided that we allow mixed strategies. Furthermore, Hájek (Philosophical Review 112, 2003) has shown that reformulations of Pascal’s Wager that address these criticisms inevitably lead to arguments that are philosophically unsatisfying and historically (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Alfred W. Benn (1905). Pascal's Wager. International Journal of Ethics 15 (3):305-323.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gregor Betz (2012). Pascals Wette. In Georg Bertram (ed.), Philosophische Gedankenexperimente – ein Lese- und Studienbuch. Reclam.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Simon Blackburn (2009). Pascal's Wager. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Nick Bostrom (2009). Pascal's Mugging. Analysis 69 (3):443-445.
    In some dark alley. . . Mugger: Hey, give me your wallet. Pascal: Why on Earth would I want to do that? Mugger: Otherwise I’ll shoot you. Pascal: But you don’t have a gun. Mugger: Oops! I knew I had forgotten something. Pascal: No wallet for you then. Have a nice evening. Mugger: Wait! Pascal: Sigh. Mugger: I’ve got a business proposition for you. . . . How about you give me your wallet now? In return, I promise to come (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Geoffrey Brown (1984). A Defence of Pascal's Wager. Religious Studies 20 (3):465 - 479.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Leslie Burkholder (2011). Pascal's Wager. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Elizabeth Burns (2011). What Happens After Pascal's Wager: Living Faith and Rational Belief – Daniel Garber. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):218-220.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John Byl (1994). On Pascal's Wager and Infinite Utilities. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):467-473.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. James Cargile (1982). Pascal's Wager. In Steven M. Cahn & David Shatz (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 250-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Alan Carter (2000). On Pascal's Wager, or Why All Bets Are Off. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):22-27.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Joann P. Cobb (1979). Pascal's Wager and Two Modern Losers. Philosophy and Literature 3 (2):187-198.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Peter C. Dalton (1976). Pascal's Wager: The First Argument. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (2):346 - 368.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Peter C. Dalton (1975). Pascal's Wager: The Second Argument. Southern Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):31-46.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Volker Dieringer (2009). Is a Jamesian Wager the Only Safe Bet? On Jeff Jordan's New Book on Pascal's Wager. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 91 (2):237-247.
    In his new book on Pascal's Wager, Jeff Jordan argues that only the ‘Jamesian’ version of the wager argument, as he sees it presented in William James' essay The Will to Believe , constitutes a sound pragmatic argument in favour of theism, whereas Pascal's original wager argument is doomed to fail on various grounds. This article argues that Jordan's theory is untenable. The many-gods objection is used as an example: it is demonstrated that the Jamesian Wager argument too is powerless (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Antony Duff (1986). Pascal's Wager and Infinite Utilities. Analysis 46 (2):107 - 109.
  24. Craig Duncan (2008). Review: Jeff Jordan: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (468):1082-1086.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Craig Duncan (2007). The Persecutor's Wager. Philosophical Review 116 (1):1-50.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Craig Duncan (2003). Do Vague Probabilities Really Scotch Pascal's Wager? Philosophical Studies 112 (3):279 - 290.
    Alan Hájek has recently argued that certain assignments of vague probability defeat Pascals Wager. In particular, he argues that skeptical agnostics – those whose probability for God''s existence is vague over an interval containing zero – have nothing to fear from Pascal. In this paper, I make two arguments against Hájek: (1) that skeptical agnosticism is a form of dogmatism, and as such should be rejected; (2) that in any case, choice situations with vague probability assignments ought to be treated (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kenny Easwaran & Bradley Monton (2012). Mixed Strategies, Uncountable Times, and Pascal's Wager: A Reply to Robertson. Analysis 72 (4):681-685.
    Pascal’s Wager holds that one has pragmatic reason to believe in God, since that course of action has infinite expected utility. The mixed strategy objection holds that one could just as well follow a course of action that has infinite expected utility but is unlikely to end with one believing in God. Monton (2011. Mixed strategies can’t evade Pascal’s Wager. Analysis 71: 642–45.) has argued that mixed strategies can’t evade Pascal’s Wager, while Robertson (2012. Some mixed strategies can evade Pascal’s (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Arthur Falk (2005). A Pascal-Type Justification of Faith in a Scientific Age. Philosophy 80 (4):543-563.
    The author argues that faith survives as a rational option, despite science rendering improbable distinctively theological claims about the world and history. After rejecting justifications of faith from natural theology and natural law, he defends a seemingly weaker strategy, a corrected version of Pascal's wager argument. The wager lets one's desires count toward showing one's faith to be rational, and the faith requires that oneÕs desires undergo radical transformation to protect the faith, making the wager argument really quite strong. As (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. James Franklin (1998). Two Caricatures, I: Pascal's Wager. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 44 (2):109 - 114.
    Pascal’s wager and Leibniz’s theory that this is the best of all possible worlds are latecomers in the Faith-and-Reason tradition. They have remained interlopers; they have never been taken as seriously as the older arguments for the existence of God and other themes related to faith and reason.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Brian J. Gibbs (2014). Winning Counterterrorism's Version of Pascal's Wager, but Struggling to Open the Purse. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):368-369.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Joshua L. Golding (1994). Pascal's Wager. Modern Schoolman 71 (2):115-143.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. William Gustason (1998). Pascal's Wager and Competing Faiths. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 44 (1):31-39.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ian Hacking (1972). The Logic of Pascal's Wager. American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (2):186 - 192.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Alan Hájek, Pascal's Wager. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    “Pascal's Wager” is the name given to an argument due to Blaise Pascal for believing, or for at least taking steps to believe, in God. The name is somewhat misleading, for in a single paragraph of his Pensées, Pascal apparently presents at least three such arguments, each of which might be called a ‘wager’ — it is only the final of these that is traditionally referred to as “Pascal's Wager”. We find in it the extraordinary confluence of several important strands (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Alan Hájek (2003). Waging War on Pascal's Wager. Philosophical Review 112 (1):27-56.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Alan Hájek (2000). Objecting Vaguely to Pascal's Wager. Philosophical Studies 98 (1-16):1 - 16.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stephen Haller (2000). A Prudential Argument for Precaution Under Uncertainty and High Risk. Ethics and the Environment 5 (2):175-189.
    Some models of global systems predict catastrophe if certain human activities continue. Unfortunately, these models are less than certain. Despite this uncertainty, some argue for precaution on the grounds that we have an ethical obligation to avoid catastrophe, whatever the practical costs. There is much to say in favor of ethical arguments. Still, some people will remain unmoved by them. Using arguments parallel to those of Pascal and James, I will argue that there are prudential reasons for precaution that should (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Frederik Herzberg (2011). Hyperreal Expected Utilities and Pascal's Wager. Logique Et Analyse 213:69-108.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Joel Hodge (2014). From Desire to Conversion: Pascal's Wager and Girard's Mimetic Theory. Heythrop Journal 55 (6).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Harmon Holcomb (1994). To Bet the Impossible Bet. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 36 (2):65 - 79.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Alan H.´jek (2000). Objecting Vaguely to Pascal's Wager. Philosophical Studies 98 (1):1-14.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Greg Janzen (2011). Pascal's Wager and the Nature of God. Sophia 50 (3):331-344.
    This paper argues that Pascal's formulation of his famous wager argument licenses an inference about God's nature that ultimately vitiates the claim that wagering for God is in one's rational self-interest. In particular, it is argued that if we accept Pascal's premises, then we can infer that the god for whom Pascal encourages us to wager is irrational. But if God is irrational, then the prudentially rational course of action is to refrain from wagering for him.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Ward E. Jones (1998). Religious Conversion, Self-Deception, and Pascal's Wager. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):167-188.
  44. Jeff Jordan (2006). Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God. Oxford University Press.
    Is it reasonable to believe in God even in the absence of strong evidence that God exists? Pragmatic arguments for theism are designed to support belief even if one lacks evidence that theism is more likely than not. Jeff Jordan proposes that there is a sound version of the most well-known argument of this kind, Pascal's Wager, and explores the issues involved - in epistemology, the ethics of belief, decision theory, and theology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jeff Jordan (2002). Pascal's Wagers. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):213–223.
    Pascal is best known among philosophers for his wager in support of Christian belief. Since Ian Hacking’s classic article on the wager, three versions of the wager have been recognized within the concise paragraphs of the Pensées. In what follows I argue that there is a fourth to be found there, a version that in many respects anticipates the argument of William James in his 1896 essay “The Will to Believe.” This fourth wager argument, I contend, differs from the better-known (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jeff Jordan (1998). Pascal's Wager Revisited. Religious Studies 34 (4):419-431.
    Pascal's wager attempts to provide a prudential reason in support of the rationality of believing that God exists. The wager employs the idea that the utility of theistic belief, if true, is infinite, and in this way, the expected utility of theism swamps that of any of its rivals. Not surprisingly the wager generates more than a good share of philosophical criticism. In this essay I examine two recent objections levelled against the wager and I argue that each fails. Following (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeff Jordan (ed.) (1994). Gambling on God: Essays on Pascal’s Wager. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jeff Jordan (1994). The St. Petersburg Paradox and Pascal's Wager. Philosophia 23 (1-4):207-222.
  49. Jeff Jordan (1991). The Many-Gods Objection and Pascal's Wager. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (3):309-317.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jeffrey Jordan (1993). Pascal's Wager and the Problem of Infinite Utilities. Faith and Philosophy 10 (1):49-59.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 102