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  1. M. Boumans (2002). Pragmatic View on Empirical Modeling A Review of Clive WJ Granger's Empirical Modeling in Economics, Specification and Evaluation. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):103-106.
  2. Daniel W. Bromley (2009). Sufficient Reason: Volitional Pragmatism and the Meaning of Economic Institutions, by Daniel W. Bromley, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (1).
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  3. D. W. Hands (2000). Expert Knowledge, Ersatz Knowledge, and Economics A Review of Robert F. Garnett Jr (Ed.) What Do Economists Know? New Economics of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (3):449-453.
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  4. J. E. King (2008). Three Arguments for Pluralism. In Edward Fullbrook (ed.), Pluralist Economics. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. A. Klamer (2002). A Review of Mark A. Lutz's Economics for the Common Good: Two Centuries of Social Economic Thought in the Humanistic Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):251-252.
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  6. Arjo Klamer (2003). A Pragmatic View on Values in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):191-212.
    A cultural economic perspective focuses on values as they affect behavior, the valuations in various spheres as well as the valorization, that is, the enhancement or the changing of values. The pragmatic view focuses on the way values function in everyday life and in particular on the deliberations in which they are formed and expressed. Values matter; the challenge is to render them susceptible to analysis in economic contexts. The illustrations are derived from the economics of the arts.
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  7. Arjo Klamer & Hendrik P. Van Dalen (2002). Attention and the Art of Scientific Publishing. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (3):289-315.
    As so many other activities nowadays, modern science revolves around the competition for attention. Unlike in so many other attention games, in science those who seek attention are more or less the same people who are giving it. An important characteristic is the skewness of the distribution of scientific attention. We discuss the effect these characteristics have on scientific institutions. An important thesis of ours is that scientists converge in clusters of likeminded scientists. Given the character of scientific organization and (...)
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  8. André Lacroix (ed.) (2011). Redéployer la Raison Pratique: Pour Une Éthique Pragmatique. Liber.
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  9. Don Lavoie (ed.) (1990). Economics and Hermeneutics. Routledge.
    Hermeneutics has become a major topic of debate throughout the scholarly community. What has been called the "interpretive turn" has led to interesting new approaches in both the human and social sciences, and has helped to transform divided disciplines by bringing them closer together. Yet one of the largest and most important social sciences economics has so far been almost completely left out of the transformation. Economics and Hermeneutics takes a significant step towards filling this gap by introducing scholars on (...)
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  10. Isaac Levi (1986). The Paradoxes of Allais and Ellsberg. Economics and Philosophy 2 (01):23-.
    In The Enterprise of Knowledge (Levi, 1980a), I proposed a general theory of rational choice which I intended as a characterization of a prescriptive theory of ideal rationality. A cardinal tenet of this theory is that assessments of expected value or expected utility in the Bayesian sense may not be representable by a numerical indicator or indeed induce an ordering of feasible options in a context of deliberation. My reasons for taking this position are related to my commitment to the (...)
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  11. John Maloney (1994). Economic Method and Economic Rhetoric. Journal of Economic Methodology 1 (2):253-268.
    McCloskey's work on the rhetoric of economics has little to say about Imre Lakatos, and indeed the scientific method prescribed by Lakatos, as it stands, would support McCloskey's claim that philosophers? imperatives bear little relation to what economists actually do. But a Bayesianized version of Lakatos is a different matter, and provides a yardstick against which the various rhetorical devices noted by McCloskey can be measured. We argue that McCloskey's list can be divided into those forms of persuasion which would (...)
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  12. Donald N. McCloskey (1994). How Economists Persuade. Journal of Economic Methodology 1 (1):15-32.
  13. Donald N. McCloskey (1988). Two Replies and a Dialogue on the Rhetoric of Economics. Economics and Philosophy 4 (01):150-.
  14. Philip Mirowski (1987). Shall I Compare Thee to a Minkowski-Ricardo-Leontief-Metzler Matrix of the Mosak-Hicks Type?: Or, Rhetoric, Mathematics, and the Nature of Neoclassical Economic Theory. Economics and Philosophy 3 (01):67-.
  15. Shabnam Mousavi & Jim Garrison (2003). Toward a Transactional Theory of Decision Making: Creative Rationality as Functional Coordination in Context. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):131-156.
    This paper poses a Deweyan challenge to both the neoclassical framework of rational choice and models of bounded rationality and deliberation, especially the procedural theory of rationality advanced by Herbert Simon. We demonstrate how modern theories on procedural or instrumental rationality trace their origin to the tradition of British empiricism, especially the philosophy of David Hume. Most theories of action such as Simon's assume actors may control their bodies 'at will.' For Dewey, habits are will; we control them (...)
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  16. Frank X. Ryan (2003). Values as Consequences of Transaction: Commentary on 'Reconciling Homo Economicus and John Dewey's Ethics'. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):245-257.
    Mark White hopes to incorporate John Dewey's appeal to deliberation in preference formation into the neoclassical model of choice. White finds affinities between Dewey and neoclassicism: both reject preordained goals, value consequences above motives, and promote 'scientific ethics.' I claim Dewey's actual theory of value and choice is more radically divergent, and may not simply be integrated with neoclassical model. Specifically, I claim: 1) White's interactional view of agents acting in an environment falls short of Dewey's transactional notion of (...)
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  17. John R. Shook (2003). Entrepreneurship and Values in a Democratic and Pragmatic Economics: Commentary on 'A Transactional View of Entrepreneurship'. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):181-190.
    Entrepreneurship cannot be explained by any economic theory that isolates innovation from ongoing social processes or locates creativity in a space of given, fixed values. Unfortunately, mainstream economics has committed these mistakes, rooted in instrumentalist and antidemocratic notions of consumption and rationality that permits reasoning only about means toward given ends. Genuine innovation is, on Dewey's pragmatic approach to values, the intelligent modification of both means and ends for experimental action. When joined to an appreciation that consumption is just a (...)
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  18. Kenneth W. Stikkers (2003). Transaction, Development, and Capacity: Commentary on 'Toward a Transactional Theory of Decision Making'. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):157-160.
    The author fundamentally agrees with Mousavi's and Garrison's criticisms of Herbert Simon's version of rational choice theory, underscoring three central points of their analysis: 1) rational choice theory's naïve assumption that consumer preferences are given and fixed, rather than transactionally formed; 2) the truncated notion of 'rationality' assumed by Simon, and other rational choice theories generally; and 3) the impoverished philosophical anthropology assumed by Simon, and the notion of homo economicus generally. The author's only significant disagreement with Mousavi and Garrison (...)
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  19. John J. Stuhr (2003). Pragmatism About Values and the Valuable: Commentary on 'A Pragmatic View on Values in Economics'. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):213-221.
    This article explores the place of values in economic theory and practical decision-making and policy. I argue that Arjo Klamer's pragmatism does not sufficiently distinguish what is valued from what is valuable, and does not sufficiently attend to the experimental inquiry needed to move from the former to the latter. I outline a more robust pragmatism, explaining how it avoids: treating values in isolation from facts; rendering claims about values subjective; and, identifying what is preferred or chosen or valued with (...)
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  20. Jeroen Van Bouwel (forthcoming). Towards Democratic Models of Science. Exploring the Case of Scientific Pluralism. Perspectives on Science.
    Scientific pluralism, a normative endorsement of the plurality or multiplicity of research approaches in science, has recently been advocated by several philosophers (e.g., Kellert et al. 2006, Kitcher 2001, Longino 2013, Mitchell 2009, and Chang 2010). Comparing these accounts of scientific pluralism, one will encounter quite some variation. We want to clarify the different interpretations of scientific pluralism by showing how they incarnate different models of democracy, stipulating the desired interaction among the plurality of research approaches in different ways. Furthermore, (...)
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  21. Oliver E. Williamson (2009). Pragmatic Methodology: A Sketch, with Applications to Transaction Cost Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):145-157.
    I address the topic of pragmatic methodology as a practitioner in applied microeconomics who has been working in the still nascent field of the ?economics of organization?. My purpose is both to make explicit the methodology out of which transaction cost economics works and to suggest that other theories of economic organization do the same. Conceivably convergence will develop in the process, maybe even a consensus. At a minimum, it will be useful to have each implicit methodology made explicit. I (...)
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  22. Altug Yalcintas (2010). PHD Thesis Summary: Intellectual Paths and Pathologies: How Small Events in Scholarly Life Accidentally Grow Big (2009). Erasmus Journal of Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):123-125.
  23. Altug Yalcintas (2009). Intellectual Paths and Pathologies: How Small Events in Scholarly Life Accidentally Grow Big. Dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam