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  1. James Aerthayil (1977). The Hesychast Method of Prayer. Journal of Dharma 2:204-216.
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  2. Adrian Andreescu (2011). Rethinking Prayer and Health Research: An Exploratory Inquiry on Prayer's Psychological Dimension. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 30 (1-2):23-47.
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  3. Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.) (2005). The Phenomenology of Prayer. Fordham University Press.
    This collection of ground-breaking essays considers the many dimensions of prayer: how prayer relates us to the divine; prayer's ability to reveal what is essential about our humanity; the power of prayer to transform human desire and action; and the relation of prayer to cognition. It takes up the meaning of prayer from within a uniquely phenomenological point of view, demonstrating that the phenomenology of prayer is as much about the character and boundaries of phenomenological analysis as it is about (...)
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  4. Mark Cauchi (2005). The Infinite Supplicant: On a Limit and a Prayer. In Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.), The Phenomenology of Prayer. Fordham University Press
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  5. David H. Chandler (2013). Kant on Prayer. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 847-858.
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  6. Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2014). Review of Hindu Samskaras: Socio-Religious Study of the Hindu Sacraments. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (8):501-2.
    This review addresses issues regarding the very shaping of Hinduism and the resistance that such shaping faces from non-Hindus. Non-Hindu polemic is challenged using Western methods.
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  7. Lorenzo Chiesa (2012). Of Bastard Man and Evil Woman, or, the Horror of Sex. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):199-212.
    Lars von Trier’s Antichrist (2009) has often been described as a ‘gothic’, if not straightforwardly ‘horror’ movie. While this claim could easily be challenged with regard to strict genre definitions, it is doubtless the case that the film deals very explicitly with fear, first and foremost the female protagonist’s fear of herself, which is placed at the top of the so-called ‘pyramid of fear’ drawn by her therapist/wanna-be-Saviour partner. My opinion is that Antichrist perfectly displays the horrific effects of the (...)
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  8. Isaac Choi (2016). Is Petitionary Prayer Superfluous? Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 7:32-62.
    Why would God institute the practice of efficacious petitionary prayer? Why would God not simply give us what we need before we ask? I examine recently proposed solutions to this puzzle and argue that they are inadequate to explain why an omniscient and perfectly good God would act differently in response to prayer. I propose that God has reasons to not always maximize a creature’s good, even in a sinless world, and that petitionary prayer functions as a means to reward (...)
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  9. David M. Ciocchi (2002). The Religious Adequacy of Free-Will Theism. Religious Studies 38 (1):45-61.
    In this paper I question the claim that the increasingly popular position known as ‘free-will theism’ or ‘the open view of God’ supports a rich religious life. To do this I advance a notion of ‘religious adequacy’, and then argue that free-will theism fails to be religiously adequate with respect to one of the principal practices of the religious life – petitionary prayer. Drawing on current work in libertarian free-will theory, I consider what are likely the only two lines of (...)
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  10. J. Caleb Clanton (2014). George Santayana and the Problem of Petitionary Prayer. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 35 (2):108-128.
    Scholars of the classical American philosophical tradition have not written much about prayer, despite the fact that almost every single one of the major figures of this tradition acknowledged its significance. The gap in the literature is notable in the case of George Santayana, who discusses prayer in several of his major works. And of all the classical American philosophers, Santayana may have the most fully developed treatment of prayer, particularly as it relates to the problem of petitionary prayer. Yet (...)
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  11. Caleb Cohoe (2014). God, Causality, and Petitionary Prayer. Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):24-45.
    Many maintain that petitionary prayer is pointless. I argue that the theist can defend petitionary prayer by giving a general account of how divine and creaturely causation can be compatible and complementary, based on the claim that the goodness of something depends on its cause. I use Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical framework to give an account that explains why a world with creaturely causation better reflects God’s goodness than a world in which God brought all things about immediately. In such a (...)
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  12. Brian Davies (2011). Prayer. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press
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  13. Mary Rute Gomes Esperandio & Kevin Lee Ladd (2013). Oração e Saúde: questões para a Teologia e para a Psicologia da Religião (Prayer and Health: issues for theology and psychology of religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p627. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (30):627-656.
    A pesquisa quantitativa tem sido predominante nos estudos sobre oração. A partir de uma abordagem qualitativa baseada na análise de conteúdo, este estudo examina as relações entre oração e saúde. Os dados são provenientes de 104 vídeos com entrevistas gravadas com participantes de igrejas Católicas, Protestantes e Pentecostais. A análise levantou quatro categorias descritivas do uso da oração: 1. Como estratégia de coping (enfrentamento) (62,5%); 2. Para manter viva a espiritualidade (15,3%); 3. Como técnica de empoderamento mútuo (8,6%); 4. Como (...)
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  14. Antony Flew & D. Z. Phillips (1967). The Concept of Prayer. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (66):91.
    Many contemporary philosophers assume that, before one can discuss prayer, the question of whether there is a God or not must be settled. In this title, first published in 1965, D. Z. Phillips argues that to understand prayer is to understand what is meant by the reality of God. Beginning by placing the problem of prayer within a philosophical context, Phillips goes on to discuss such topics as prayer and the concept of talking, prayer and dependence, superstition and the concept (...)
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  15. Peter J. Floriani (1988). A Prayer for Canonisation. The Chesterton Review 14 (4):641-644.
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  16. W. Paul Franks (2009). Why a Believer Could Believe That God Answers Prayers. Sophia 48 (3):319-324.
    In a previous issue of this journal Michael Veber argued that God could not answer certain prayers because doing so would be immoral. In this article I attempt to demonstrate that Veber’s argument is simply the logical problem of evil applied to a possible world. Because of this, his argument is susceptible to a Plantinga-style defense.
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  17. J. R. Geiger (1931). Psychology and Prayer. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 12 (1):38.
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  18. Jerome I. Gellman (1997). In Defense of Petitionary Prayer. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):83-97.
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  19. Stephen Happel (1981). Prayer and Sacrament: A Role in Foundational Theology. The Thomist 45 (2):243.
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  20. Friedrich Heiler (1933). Prayer. Philosophical Review 42:342.
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  21. Ronald W. Hepburn (1966). The Concept of Prayer. Philosophical Books 7 (2):23-25.
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  22. Harry Hoffner Jr (1983). A Prayer Of Muršili Ii About His Stepmother. Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (1):187-192.
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  23. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2008). The Puzzle of Prayers of Thanksgiving and Praise. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan
    in eds. Yujin Nagasawa and Erik Wielenberg, New Waves in Philosophy of Religion (Palgrave MacMillan 2008).
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  24. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (2010). The Puzzle of Petitionary Prayer. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (2):43-68.
    The fact that our asking God to do something can make a difference to what he does underwrites the point of petitionary prayer. Here, however, a puzzle arises: Either doing what we ask is the best God can do or it is not. If it is, then our asking won’t make any difference to whether he does it. If it is not, then our asking won’t make any difference to whether he does it. So, our asking won’t make any difference (...)
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  25. Claire Katz (2007). "On A Word And A Prayer": Education, Prayer, and the Affirmation of Faith. Journal of Textual Reasoning 5 (1).
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  26. Martin Laird (2005). The “Open Country Whose Name is Prayer”: Apophasis, Deconstruction, and Contemplative Practice. Modern Theology 21 (1):141-155.
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  27. Danielle A. Layne (2013). Philosophical Prayer in Proclus’s Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. Review of Metaphysics 67 (2):345-368.
    In response to Timaeus’ invocation of the gods at Timaeus 27c1-d4, Proclus discusses, in his commentary on the text, the value of prayer. Heralding the fact that prayer marks the soul’s epistrophe or return to its causative principle, Proclus proceeds to exonerate those who invoke and pray to the gods, arguing that prayer enacts the emergence of human freedom in the determined world. He argues that since the gods are not only our superior causes but also the ones who have (...)
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  28. Lawrence Masek (2000). Petitionary Prayer to an Omnipotent and Omnibenevolent God. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74 (Suppl.):273-283.
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  29. D. Macleod Matheson (1951). Writings From the Philokalia on Prayer of the Heart. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 50:297.
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  30. Gervase Mathew (1936). The Prayer of Quiet. Blackfriars.
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  31. Don A. Merrell, On the (Near) Impossibility of Studying Intercessory Prayers for Healing.
    The most recent and, arguably, the most scientifically rigorous study of the healing power of intercessory prayer, the so-called “STEP” (“Study of the Therapeutic Effects of Prayer”) study involved over 1,800 subjects and roughly a decade of study. Though the results did little, if anything, to lend support to the idea that prayers really can heal the sick, religious believers might remain optimistic. Two main reasons for this optimism stem from, first, a crucial missing (though practically unavoidable) study control and, (...)
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  32. Hannah More (1819). Moral Sketches of Prevailing Opinions and Manners, Foreign and Domestic with Reflections on Prayer. T. Cadell & W. Davies.
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  33. Francis William Newman (2009). The Controversy About Prayer. The Works of Francis William Newman on Religion 9:1-8.
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  34. Graham Oppy & Mark Saward (2013). Molinism and Divine Prophecy of Free Actions. Religious Studies 50 (2):1-10.
    Among challenges to Molinism, the challenge posed by divine prophecy of human free action has received insufficient attention. We argue that this challenge is a significant addition to the array of challenges that confront Molinism.
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  35. Ossory (1910). Prayer, I. Hibbert Journal 9:650.
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  36. Richard Oxenberg, In Search of the Ontological Argument.
    We can attend to the logic of Anselm's ontological argument, and amuse ourselves for a few hours unraveling its convoluted word-play, or we can seek to look beyond the flawed logic, to the search for God it expresses. From the perspective of this second approach the Ontological Argument proves to be more than a mere argument; it is a contemplative exercise. One can see in the argument a tantalizing attempt to capture in logical form the devotee’s experience of the presence (...)
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  37. Paramananda & Ramakrishna Vedanta Centre (1977). Book of Daily Thoughts and Prayers. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  38. Ryan Matthew Parker & Bradley Rettler (forthcoming). A Possible Worlds Solution to the Puzzle of Petitionary Prayer. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    The puzzle of petitionary prayer: if we ask for the best thing, God was already going to do it, and if we ask for something that's not the best, God's not going to grant our request. In this paper, we give a new solution to the puzzle.
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  39. Daniel T. Pekarske (1990). Santayana on Laughter and Prayer. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 11 (2):143 - 152.
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  40. Porter (2012). A Prayer. The Chesterton Review 38 (3-4):611-611.
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  41. George John Romanes (1984). Christian Prayer and General Laws Being the Burney Prize Essay for the Year 1873, with an Appendix on the Physical Efficacy of Prayer.
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  42. A. S. S. (1967). The Concept of Prayer. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):376-377.
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  43. S. A. S. (1967). The Concept of Prayer. Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):376-377.
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  44. Tania ap Siôn (2007). Listening to Prayers: An Analysis of Prayers Left in a Country Church in Rural England. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):199-226.
    This study builds on a long-established tradition within the psychology of religion concerned with the analysis and interpretation of prayer. Drawing on 917 prayer-cards le in one rural church over a sixteenth-month period, the analysis distinguishes between three aspects of intercessory and supplicatory prayer defined as reference, intention, and objective. Results of the analysis showed that only 4% of prayer requests had the prayer author as a key focus, and that there was a preference to pray for other people and (...)
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  45. Saul Smilansky (2014). A Moral Problem About Prayer. Think 13 (36):105-113.
    At a time of acute danger, people commonly petition God for help for themselves or their loved ones. Such prayer seems natural and, indeed, for believers, reasonable and acceptable. But once we closely examine what is actually happening in such situations, we see that frequently such prayer is not morally innocuous. I present a number of examples which illustrate the difficulty, and argue that even assuming the benevolence of the deity does not suffice to make such prayer legitimate.
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  46. Saul Smilansky (2014). A Moral Problem About Prayer. Think 13 (36):105-113.
    At a time of acute danger, people commonly petition God for help for themselves or their loved ones. Such prayer seems natural and, indeed, for believers, reasonable and acceptable. But once we closely examine what is actually happening in such situations, we see that frequently such prayer is not morally innocuous. I present a number of examples which illustrate the difficulty, and argue that even assuming the benevolence of the deity does not suffice to make such prayer legitimate.
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  47. Nicholas D. Smith (2013). Philosophical Reflection on Petitionary Prayer. Philosophy Compass 8 (3):309-317.
    If God actually answers prayers that petition him for something, then it seems he is willing to withhold some good from the world unless and until someone prays for those goods. But how is this compatible with His benevolence? On the other hand, if God is dedicated to providing every good to us that we may need, it would seem that He would provide these to us even if we did not pray for them. But if so, it would appear (...)
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  48. Nicholas D. Smith & Andrew C. Yip (2010). Partnership with God: A Partial Solution to the Problem of Petitionary Prayer. Religious Studies 46 (3):395 - 410.
    Why would God make us ask for some good He might supply, and why would it be right for God to withhold that good unless and until we asked for it? We explain why present defences of petitionary prayer are insufficient, but argue that a world in which God makes us ask for some goods and then supplies them in response to our petitions adds value to the world that would not be available in worlds in which God simply supplied (...)
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  49. Charles Stewart (1910). Prayer. Hibbert Journal 9:892.
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  50. Columba Stewart & S. B. O. (2008). Prayer. In Susan Ashbrook Harvey & David G. Hunter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies. OUP Oxford
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