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  1. Peter Adamson (2006). Al-Kind=I. OUP USA.
    The first book in the Great Medieval Thinkers series to focus on an Islamic philosopher. It offers a brief, accessible introduction to the thought of the philosopher al -Kindi (died roughly 870 AD). His works, though brief, are of great historical importance. Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. Peter Adamson will survey what is known of al-Kindi's life, examine his thought on a wide range of topics, and consider the relationship of al-Kindi's work to his Greek sources.
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  2. Peter Adamson (2002). Before Essence and Existence: Al-Kindi's Conception of Being. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):297-312.
    This paper studies the first metaphysical theory in Arabic philosophy, that of al-Kindi, as found in "On First Philosophy" and other of his works. Placing these works against the background of translations produced in al-Kindi's circle (the "Theology of Aristotle," which is the Arabic version of Plotinus, and the "Liber de Causis," the Arabic version of Proclus' "Elements of Theology"), it argues that al-Kindi has two conceptions of being: "simple" being, which excludes predication and derives from Neoplatonism, and "complex" being, (...)
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  3. Emmanuel Alloa (2013). Visual Studies in Byzantium. A Pictorial Turn Avant la Lettre. Journal of Visual Culture 12 (1):3-29.
    As Hegel once said, in Byzantium, between homoousis and homoiousis, the difference of one letter could decide the life and death of thousands. As this article seeks to argue, Byzantine thinking was not only attentive to conceptual differences, but also to iconic ones. The iconoclastic controversy (726-842 AD) arose from two different interpretations of the nature of images: whereas iconoclastic philosophy is based on the assumption of a :fundamental 'iconic identity', iconophile philosophy defends the idea of'iconic difference'. And while the (...)
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  4. E. J. Ashworth (1988). Review Article. Vivarium 26 (2):141-150.
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  5. F. B. A. Asiedu (2002). Augustine's Christian–Platonist Account of Goodness: A Reconsideration. Heythrop Journal 43 (3):328–343.
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  6. Michel R. Barnes (1994). The Polemical Context and Content of Gregory of Nyssa's Psychology. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 4:1-24.
  7. John C. Cavadini (1981). Alcuin and Augustine. Augustinian Studies 12:11-18.
  8. Erin M. Cline (2005). Augustine's Change of Aspect. Heythrop Journal 46 (2):135–148.
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  9. Naomi G. Cohen (2004). Philo on the Creation D. T. Runia: Philo of Alexandria : On the Creation of the Cosmos According to Moses. Introduction, Translation and Commentary . (Philo of Alexandria Commentary Series 1.) Pp. XVIII + 443. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2001. Cased, €103/Us$120. Isbn: 90-04-12169-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (1):50.
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  10. L. M. De Rijk (1963). On the Curriculum of the Arts of the Trivium at St. Gall From C. 850-C. 1000. Vivarium 1 (1):35-86.
  11. J. M. Dillon (1988). Latin Platonism Stephen Gersh: Middle Platonism and Neoplatonism. The Latin Tradition. (Publications in Medieval Studies, 23.) 2 Vols. Pp. Xx + 413; Xviii + 421–939. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1986. £67.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (01):71-73.
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  12. John Dillon (1999). Philo & the Church Fathers. Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):184-186.
  13. Johannes Dräseke (1914). XX. Zu Johannes Scotus Erigena. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 27 (4):428-448.
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  14. Donald F. Duclow (1972). Pseudo-Dionysius, John Scotus Eriugena, Nicholas of Cusa. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (2):260-278.
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  15. Michael Dunne & J. J. McEvoy (eds.) (2002). History and Eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and His Time: Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, [Held at] Maynooth and Dublin, August 16-20, 2002. [REVIEW] University Press.
    ... END Reflections on Johannes Scottus's Place in Carolingian Eschatology BERNARD MCGINN I. Eschatology in the Ninth Century In 847, during the decade that ...
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  16. Paul Edward Dutton (2005). Filiolitas. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (4):549-566.
    The ninth-century Irish philosopher, theologian, and speculative grammarian Eriugena invented a number of words, chiefly in order to accommodate Greek terms in Latin. Filiolitas or “sonship” was one of these and a particularly distinctive new word, which almost no one but Eriugena seems to have used. Indeed it appears in all the works ascribed to him and serves both as a word for adoptive sonship in a theological context and as a relative noun in grammatical references. The appearance of the (...)
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  17. Paul Edward Dutton (1997). Eriugena, De la Division de la Nature: Periphyseon, Livre Il: La Nature Créatrice Incréée, Livre II: La Nature Creatrice Créée. Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):654-656.
  18. J. Engels (1963). Origine, Sens Et Survie du Terme Boécien «Secundum Placitum». Vivarium 1 (1):87-114.
    La première fois que SECUNDUM PLACITUM se présente chez Boèce, c'est dans sa traduction de la définition aristotélienne du nom du Peri Herméneias (I6 a I9): "Ovoμα μν oüv στ φων σημαντιΧ Χατ συνΧην...Ι qu'il rend: NOMEN ERGO EST VOX SIGNIFICATIVA SECUNDUM PLACITUM. L'expression y est le substitut de Χατ συνν qu'on interprète en général comme signifiant «par convention». En interprétant SECUNDUM PLACITUM de la même manière, on a l'avantage de faire correspondre parfaitement l'expression latine au sens usuel du terme (...)
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  19. Michael Ewbank (1993). Pseudo-Dionysius and the Metaphysics of Aquinas. Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):375-377.
  20. Leo C. Ferrari (1980). Paul at the Conversion of Augustine. Augustinian Studies 11:5-20.
  21. Jerold C. Frakes (1988). The Fate of Fortune in the Early Middle Ages: The Boethian Tradition. E.J. Brill.
    CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION Previous studies of fortuna in ancient and medieval culture are numerous — to be found as full-length monographs, articles and ...
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  22. Jerold C. Frakes (1984). The Ancient Concept of Casus and its Early Medieval Interpretations. Vivarium 22 (1):1-34.
  23. Matthias Gerth (2011). Martianus Capella (B.) Ferré (Ed., Trans.) Martianus Capella: Les Noces de Philologie Et de Mercure. Tome VI. Livre VI. La Géométrie. (Collection des Universités de France Publiée Sous le Patronage de l'Association Guillaume Budé 389.) Pp. Cxxii + 209. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2007. Paper, €39. ISBN: 978-2-251-01449-4. (R.) Schievenin Nugis Ignosce Lectitans. Studi Su Marziano Capella. (Polymnia 12.) Pp. Viii + 211, Figs. Trieste: EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2009. Paper, €20. ISBN: 978-88-8303-270-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):492-494.
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  24. S. L. Greenslade (1947). M. Thomas Aquinas Carroll: The Venerable Bede: His Spiritual Teachings. (Studies in Mediaeval History, New Series, Vol. IX.) Pp. Ix+270. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1946. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (3-4):130-.
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  25. Carolyn G. Hartz (2007). Bede and the Grammar of Time. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (4):625 – 640.
  26. Herman Hausheer (1937). St. Augustine's Conception of Time. Philosophical Review 46 (5):503-512.
  27. R. M. Henry (1939). The Gateway to the Middle Ages Eleanor Shipley Duckett: The Gateway to the Middle Ages. Pp. Xii+620; Frontispiece (Portrait of Boethius). New York: The Macmillan Company (London: Macmillan), 1938. Cloth, 21s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (5-6):198-199.
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  28. Darren Hibbs (2005). Was Gregory of Nyssa a Berkeleyan Idealist? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):425 – 435.
  29. Marian Hillar, Philo of Alexandria. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  30. E. F. Jacob (1936). The Birth of the Middle Ages H. St. L. B. Moss : The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395–814. Pp. Xviii + 291; 8 Plates, 10 Maps. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1935. Cloth, 12s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (05):197-.
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  31. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (2003). Al-Fārābi on the Democratic City. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):379 – 394.
    This essay will explore some of al-Farabı’s paradoxical remarks on the nature and status of the democratic city (al-madınah al-jama`ıyyah). In describing this type of non-virtuous city, Farabı departs significantly from Plato, according the democratic city a superior standing and casting it in a more positive light. Even though at one point Farabı follows Plato in considering the timocratic city to be the best of the imperfect cities, at another point he implies that the democratic city occupies this position. Since (...)
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  32. Brian Leftow (1993). From Augustine to Eriugena: Essays on Neoplatonism and Christianity in Honor of John O'Meara (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):460-461.
  33. Joseph T. Lienhard (1995). Origen and Augustine. Augustinian Studies 26 (1):37-47.
  34. W. L. Lorimer (1940). R. Klibansky: The Continuity of the Platonic Tradition During the Middle Ages. Outlines of a Corpus Platonicum Medii Aevi. Pp. 58; 5 Plates. London: Warburg Institute, 1939. Cloth, 55. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (03):169-170.
  35. John Mcguckin (1990). Did Augustine's Christology Depend on Theodore of Mopsuestia? Heythrop Journal 31 (1):39–52.
  36. Paul J. W. Miller (1991). The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena: A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):302-303.
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  37. Dermot Moran (1999). Idealism in Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1):53-82.
    In this article I wish to re-examine the vexed issue of the possibility of idealism in ancient and medieval philosophy with particular reference to the case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena (c. 800idealisms immaterialism as his standard for idealism, and it is this decision, coupled with his failure to acknowledge the legacy of German idealism, which prevents him from seeing the classical and medieval roots of idealism more broadly understood.
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  38. Dermot Moran (1990). Pantheism From John Scottus Eriugena to Nicholas of Cusa. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (1):131-152.
  39. Isabel Moreira (1996). Augustine's Three Visions and Three Heavens in Some Early Medieval Florilegia. Vivarium 34 (1):1-14.
  40. Dominic J. O'Meara (1981). The Concept of Natura in John Scottus Eriugena (de Divisione Naturae Book I). Vivarium 19 (2):126-145.
  41. Willemien Otten (1990). The Interplay of Nature and Man in the Periphyseon of Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Vivarium 28 (1):1-16.
  42. John Penwill (2004). Does God Care? Lactantius V. Epicurus in the de Ira Dei. Sophia 43 (1):23-43.
    In theDe Ira Dei Lactantius seeks to provide a philosophical rationale for events narrated in theDe Mortibus Persecutorum by arguing that God is capable of anger. In doing so he has to refute the Epicurean position that the gods have no interest in human affairs. A number of his arguments are subjected to critical scrutiny, and it is shown that they largely fail to convince because Lactantius does not have a sufficient grasp of basic Epicurean doctrine. What Lactantius’ work shows (...)
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  43. Giorgio Pini (2012). Logic, Theology, and Poetry in Boethius, Abelard, and Alain of Lille: Words in the Absence of Things. By Eileen C. Sweeney. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):252-254.
  44. Edwin A. Quain (1947). Cicero in the Courtroom of St. Thomas Aquinas. Thought 22 (1):175-177.
  45. Yael Raizman-Kedar (2006). Plotinus's Conception of Unity and Multiplicity as the Root to the Medieval Distinction Between Lux and Lumen. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):379-397.
  46. Lee C. Rice (1971). "Philosophy From St. Augustine to Ockham," by Ralph M. Mclnerny. Modern Schoolman 48 (4):418-418.
  47. David G. Robertson (2002). A Patristic Theory of Proper Names. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (1):1-19.
    In the fourth-century Greek theologian Basil of Caesarea is found a discussion of the signification of proper names, which appears to pick up some points from earlier ideas about language. He undertakes an analysis of proper names in response to his theological opponents. I will argue that Basil presents a theory which in some respects anticipates modern description theories. Basil has an idea of the role of cognition in a theory of naming. (edited).
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  48. Paul Vincent Spade, Fridugisus of Tours, on the Being of Nothing and Shadows (Complete).
    1 There have been several editions of Fridugisus’ letter. I have consulted those in Jaques-Paul Migne, Patrologiae cursus completus … series latina, 221 vols., (Paris: J.-P. Migne, 1844–1864), vol. 105, cols. 751–756; Francesco Corvino, “Il ‘De nihilo et tenebris’ di Fredegiso di Tours,” Rivista critica di storia della filosofia (1956), pp. 273–286; and the most recent and authoritative edition, in Concettina Gennaro, Fridugiso di Tours e il “De substantia nihili et tenebrarum”: Edizione critica e studio introduttivo, (“Pubblicazioni dell’istituto universitario di (...)
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  49. Georgios Steiris (2012). Isidore of Seville and Al- Fārābi on Animals: Ontology and Ethics. In Evangelos Protopapadakis (ed.), Animal Ethics: Past and Present Perspectives. Logos Verlag.
    In this article the treatment of animals by the early Christian and Arabic philosophy has been developed, focusing mainly on the work of Isidore of Seville and Al-Farabi. The contribution of this study is to highlight the insufficiently considered aspects of the ontology of animals and of their endorsement as moral "subjects" in both Latin and Arabic literature up to our days.
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  50. Georgios Steiris (2012). Al-Farabi’s Ecumenical State and its Modern Connotations. Skepsis (iii):253-261.
    al-Fārābi was well aware that ecumenism can easily convert to tyranny if a certain city–state attempts to impose its laws outside its territory. State legislation depends on specific cultural and historical factors which deprives it from being universal because culture and history could not unite different nations in an ecumenical state. Legislation has to be built on universal premises, e.g. on philosophy, so as to serve the needs of a global state. Philosophy is the bond which unites humans and communities, (...)
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