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  1. Masanari Asano, Irina Basieva, Andrei Khrennikov, Masanori Ohya & Ichiro Yamato (2013). Non-Kolmogorovian Approach to the Context-Dependent Systems Breaking the Classical Probability Law. Foundations of Physics 43 (7):895-911.
    There exist several phenomena breaking the classical probability laws. The systems related to such phenomena are context-dependent, so that they are adaptive to other systems. In this paper, we present a new mathematical formalism to compute the joint probability distribution for two event-systems by using concepts of the adaptive dynamics and quantum information theory, e.g., quantum channels and liftings. In physics the basic example of the context-dependent phenomena is the famous double-slit experiment. Recently similar examples have been found in biological (...)
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  2. Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.) (2012). Probability in Physics. Springer.
    Emch, G.G., Liu, C.: The Logic of Thermostatistical Physics. Springer, Berlin/ Heidelberg (2002) 11. Frigg, R., Werndl, C.: Entropy – a guide for the perplexed. Forthcoming in: Beisbart, C., Hartmann, S. (eds.) Probabilities in Physics. Oxford  ...
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  3. Dennis Dieks (2010). Physical and Philosophical Perspectives on Probability, Explanation and Time (Workshop of the ESF Programme "The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective", Utrecht University, 19–20 October 2009). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):383 - 388.
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  4. Ellery Eells & James H. Fetzer (eds.) (2010). The Place of Probability in Science. Springer.
    To clarify and illuminate the place of probability in science Ellery Eells and James H. Fetzer have brought together some of the most distinguished philosophers ...
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  5. Artur Ekert, Complex and Unpredictable Cardano.
    At a purely instrumental level, quantum theory is all about multiplication, addition and taking mod squares of complex numbers called probability amplitudes. The rules for combining amplitudes are deceptively simple. When two or more events are independent you multiply their respective probability amplitudes and when they are mutually exclusive you add them. Whenever you want to calculate probabilities you take mod squares of respective amplitudes. That’s it. If you are prepared to ignore the explanatory power of the theory (which you (...)
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  6. Ian G. Fuss & Daniel J. Navarro (2013). Open Parallel Cooperative and Competitive Decision Processes: A Potential Provenance for Quantum Probability Decision Models. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (4):818-843.
    In recent years quantum probability models have been used to explain many aspects of human decision making, and as such quantum models have been considered a viable alternative to Bayesian models based on classical probability. One criticism that is often leveled at both kinds of models is that they lack a clear interpretation in terms of psychological mechanisms. In this paper we discuss the mechanistic underpinnings of a quantum walk model of human decision making and response time. The quantum walk (...)
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  7. Shan Gao, The Basis of Indeterminism.
    We show that the motion of particles may be essentially discontinuous and random.
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  8. Amihud Gilead (2014). Pure Possibilities and Some Striking Scientific Discoveries. Foundations of Chemistry 16 (2):149-163.
    Regardless or independent of any actuality or actualization and exempt from spatiotemporal and causal conditions, each individual possibility is pure. Actualism excludes the existence of individual pure possibilities, altogether or at least as existing independently of actual reality. In this paper, I demonstrate, on the grounds of my possibilist metaphysics—panenmentalism—how some of the most fascinating scientific discoveries in chemistry could not have been accomplished without relying on pure possibilities and the ways in which they relate to each other (for instance, (...)
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  9. Amihud Gilead (2013). Shechtman's Three Question Marks: Possibility, Impossibility, and Quasicrystals. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 15 (2):209-224.
    The revolutionary discovery of actual quasicrystals, thanks to Dan Shechtman’s stamina, is a golden opportunity to analyze once again the role that pure (“theoretical”) possibilities and saving them plays in scientific progress. Some theoreticians, primarily Alan Mackay, contributed to saving pure possibilities of quasicrystalline structures and to opening materials science for them. My analysis rests upon an original modal metaphysics—panenmentalism—which I introduced and have been developing since 1999, quite independently of any familiarity with modern crystallography, and which deals with saving (...)
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  10. Sheldon Goldstein (2012). Typicality and Notions of Probability in Physics. In. In Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.), Probability in Physics. Springer. 59--71.
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  11. Lucien Hardy & William K. Wootters (2012). Limited Holism and Real-Vector-Space Quantum Theory. Foundations of Physics 42 (3):454-473.
    Quantum theory has the property of “local tomography”: the state of any composite system can be reconstructed from the statistics of measurements on the individual components. In this respect the holism of quantum theory is limited. We consider in this paper a class of theories more holistic than quantum theory in that they are constrained only by “bilocal tomography”: the state of any composite system is determined by the statistics of measurements on pairs of components. Under a few auxiliary assumptions, (...)
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  12. James Hawthorne & Michael Silberstein (1995). For Whom the Bell Arguments Toll. Synthese 102 (1):99-138.
    We will formulate two Bell arguments. Together they show that if the probabilities given by quantum mechanics are approximately correct, then the properties exhibited by certain physical systems must be nontrivially dependent on thetypes of measurements performedand eithernonlocally connected orholistically related to distant events. Although a number of related arguments have appeared since John Bell's original paper (1964), they tend to be either highly technical or to lack full generality. The following arguments depend on the weakest of premises, and the (...)
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  13. Michael Heller, Leszek Pysiak & Wiesław Sasin (2011). Fundamental Problems in the Unification of Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (5):905-918.
    We discuss the following problems, plaguing the present search for the “final theory”: (1) How to find a mathematical structure rich enough to be suitably approximated by the mathematical structures of general relativity and quantum mechanics? (2) How to reconcile nonlocal phenomena of quantum mechanics with time honored causality and reality postulates? (3) Does the collapse of the wave function contain some hints concerning the future quantum gravity theory? (4) It seems that the final theory cannot avoid the problem of (...)
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  14. Jenann Ismael, Probability in Classical Physics: The Fundamental Measure.
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  15. Edwin T. Jaynes (1973). The Well-Posed Problem. Foundations of Physics 3 (4):477-493.
    Many statistical problems, including some of the most important for physical applications, have long been regarded as underdetermined from the standpoint of a strict frequency definition of probability; yet they may appear wellposed or even overdetermined by the principles of maximum entropy and transformation groups. Furthermore, the distributions found by these methods turn out to have a definite frequency correspondence; the distribution obtained by invariance under a transformation group is by far the most likely to be observed experimentally, in the (...)
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  16. Adrian Kent (2010). One World Versus Many: The Inadequacy of Everettian Accounts of Evolution, Probability, and Scientific Confirmation. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.
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  17. Andrei Khrennikov (2005). The Principle of Supplementarity: A Contextual Probabilistic Viewpoint to Complementarity, the Interference of Probabilities and Incompatibility of Variables in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 35 (10):1655-1693.
  18. Barry Loewer, Eric Winsberg & Brad Weslake (eds.) (forthcoming). Currently-Unnamed Volume Discussing David Albert's "Time and Chance&Quot;.
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  19. David Papineau (2010). A Scandal of Probability Theory. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.
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  20. Simon Saunders (2010). Chance in the Everett Interpretation. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.
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  21. Orly Shenker & Meir Hemmo (2011). Introduction to the Philosophy of Statistical Mechanics: Can Probability Explain the Arrow of Time in the Second Law of Thermodynamics? Philosophy Compass 6 (9):640-651.
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  22. Jennifer S. Trueblood & Jerome R. Busemeyer (2011). A Quantum Probability Account of Order Effects in Inference. Cognitive Science 35 (8):1518-1552.
    Order of information plays a crucial role in the process of updating beliefs across time. In fact, the presence of order effects makes a classical or Bayesian approach to inference difficult. As a result, the existing models of inference, such as the belief-adjustment model, merely provide an ad hoc explanation for these effects. We postulate a quantum inference model for order effects based on the axiomatic principles of quantum probability theory. The quantum inference model explains order effects by transforming a (...)
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  23. Sylvia Wenmackers & Danny E. P. Vanpoucke (2012). Models and Simulations in Material Science: Two Cases Without Error Bars. Statistica Neerlandica 66 (3):339–355.
    We discuss two research projects in material science in which the results cannot be stated with an estimation of the error: a spectroscopic ellipsometry study aimed at determining the orientation of DNA molecules on diamond and a scanning tunneling microscopy study of platinum-induced nanowires on germanium. To investigate the reliability of the results, we apply ideas from the philosophy of models in science. Even if the studies had reported an error value, the trustworthiness of the result would not depend on (...)
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Probability in the Physical Sciences, Misc
  1. Dennis Dieks (2010). Quantum Mechanics, Chance and Modality. Philosophica 83 (1):117-137.
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  2. Antony Eagle (forthcoming). Is the Past a Matter of Chance? In Alastair Wilson (ed.), Chance and Temporal Asymmetry. Oxford University Press.
  3. P. Hájíček (2009). Quantum Model of Classical Mechanics: Maximum Entropy Packets. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 39 (9):1072-1096.
    In a previous paper, a statistical method of constructing quantum models of classical properties has been described. The present paper concludes the description by turning to classical mechanics. The quantum states that maximize entropy for given averages and variances of coordinates and momenta are called ME packets. They generalize the Gaussian wave packets. A non-trivial extension of the partition-function method of probability calculus to quantum mechanics is given. Non-commutativity of quantum variables limits its usefulness. Still, the general form of the (...)
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  4. Iñaki San Pedro & Mauricio Suárez (2009). Reichenbach’s Common Cause Principle and Indeterminism: A Review. In José Luis González Recio (ed.), Philosophical Essays on Physics and Biology. Georg Olms Verlag. 223-250.
    We offer a review of some of the most influential views on the status of Reichenbach’s Principle of the Common Cause (RPCC) for genuinely indeterministic systems. We first argue that the RPCC is properly a conjunction of two distinct claims, one metaphysical and another methodological. Both claims can and have been contested in the literature, but here we simply assume that the metaphysical claim is correct, in order to focus our analysis on the status of the methodological claim. We briefly (...)
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