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  1. Douglas R. Anderson (2001). Emphatics (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):321-323.
    To read any book by Paul Weiss is to enter into an ongoing philosophical discussion. Emphatics is no exception. Here Weiss takes up some issues from previous work but from a new angle of vision. Much of what he says also moves beyond the content of earlier writings, which is as it should be. "A creative, systematic philosopher," Weiss says, "is somewhat like a poet rewriting a long poem, preserving some parts of earlier versions in later ones. What has been (...)
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  2. Leslie Armour (1992). Logic and Experience in Whitehead's Metaphysics. Process Studies 21 (4):203-218.
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  3. Harald Atmanspacher, Vi. Reflections on Process and Persons.
    This contribution reflects on Nicholas Rescher's discussion of “process and persons” in his book Process Metaphysics. Its main purposes are to offer conceptual commentary on some of Rescher's terms, and to suggest some options for process thinking more radical than Rescher's, partly motivated by recent developments in science and philosophy. First, a brief analysis of the relation between process and time is presented, emphasizing irreversibility and temporal holism as crucial for a processual worldview. Second, instability and transiency are introduced as (...)
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  4. G. B. Bagci (2009). Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber Collapse Theory and Whiteheadian Process Philosophy. Process Studies 38 (2):368-393.
    There have been many attempts to undertand the connections between quantum theory and Whiteheadian process philosophy. However, due to the ontological considerations, it is very important to specify which interpretation of quantum theory one embraces before inquiring into the details of Whitehead`s philosophy of organism. In this article, I argue that Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse interpretation of quantum theory serves as a suitable point of departure for future endeavors. Comparisons with many-worlds interpretation and decoherence approach have also been provided.
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  5. Chung-Hyun Baik (2012). “Ontology and Epistemology in Contemporary Discussions on the Relation Between the Immanent Trinity and the Economic Trinity”. Process Studies 40 (1):201-202.
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  6. Mark Bickhard (2011). Some Consequences (and Enablings) of Process Metaphysics. Axiomathes 21 (1):3-32.
    The interactivist model has explored a number of consequences of process metaphysics. These include reversals of some fundamental metaphysical assumptions dominant since the ancient Greeks, and multiple further consequences throughout the metaphysics of the world, minds, and persons. This article surveys some of these consequences, ranging from issues regarding entities and supervenience to the emergence of normative phenomena such as representation, rationality, persons, and ethics.
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  7. Mark H. Bickhard (2009). The Interactivist Model. Synthese 166 (3):547 - 591.
    A shift from a metaphysical framework of substance to one of process enables an integrated account of the emergence of normative phenomena. I show how substance assumptions block genuine ontological emergence, especially the emergence of normativity, and how a process framework permits a thermodynamic-based account of normative emergence. The focus is on two foundational forms of normativity, that of normative function and of representation as emergent in a particular kind of function. This process model of representation, called interactivism, compels changes (...)
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  8. Mark H. Bickhard (2004). Part II: Applications of Process-Based Theories: Process and Emergence: Normative Function and Representation. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 14 (1-3):121-155.
    Kim's argument appears to render causally efficacious emergence impossible: Hume's argument appears to render normative emergence impossible, and, in its general form, it precludes any emergence at all. I argue that both of these barriers can be overcome, and, in fact, that they each constitute reductions of their respective underlying presuppositions. In particular, causally efficacious ontological emergence can be modeled, but only within a process metaphysics, thus avoiding Kim's argument, and making use of non-abbreviatory forms of definition, thus avoiding Hume's (...)
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  9. Irving Biederman (2003). On the Relation Between Kanizsa's Bias Towards Convexity and the Gestaltists Prägnanz From the Perspective of Current in Shape Recognition. Axiomathes 13 (3-4):329-346.
    What is the relation between Kanizsa's bias towards convexity and the Gestaltists' demonstrations that perceptual organization obeys a principle of pragnänz, or simplicity? Why should either kind of bias exist? Textbook accounts assign no functional role for these biases. Geon theory (Biederman 1987) proposes that we can understand these biases in terms of fundamental processes by which complex objects are decomposed into convex (or singly concave) regions at points of matched cusps according to the transversality regularity (Hoffman and Richards 1985). (...)
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  10. Peter Binns (1994). Integrity, Boundary and the Ecology of Personal Processes. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 37:83-.
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  11. Douglas Browning (1965). Philosophers of Process. New York, Random House.
    This book is intended to fill the need for a single volume of primary texts in this area.
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  12. Philip Clayton (2010). Something New Under the Sun: Forty Years of Philosophy of Religion, with a Special Look at Process Philosophy. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):139-152.
    Looking back over the last 40 years of work in the philosophy of religion provides a fascinating vantage point from which to assess the state of the discipline today. I describe central features of American philosophy of religion in 1970 and reconstruct the last 40 years as a progression through four main stages. This analysis offers an overarching framework from which to examine the major contributions and debates of process philosophy of religion during the same period. The major thinkers, topics, (...)
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  13. Ramona Cormier (1975). Process and the Escape From Nihilism. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 24:1-11.
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  14. F. D. D. (1974). Two Process Philosophers. Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):121-122.
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  15. Cornelis de Waal (2004). Process Pragmatism. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (98):77-78.
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  16. James Wayne Dye (1974). Heraclitus and the Future of Process Philosophy. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 23:13-31.
  17. T. L. E. (1977). Studies in Process Philosophy II. Review of Metaphysics 31 (1):130-130.
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  18. W. G. E. (1964). Philosophy in Process. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):483-484.
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  19. Timothy E. Eastman (2008). Our Cosmos, From Substance to Process. World Futures 64 (2):84 – 93.
    Philosophies of nature over the past three centuries have gone through three distinct phases, beginning with classical views and now evolving into a process view at the dawn of the 21st century. These phases derive from a complex weaving of two frameworks of physics since Newton's time [classical, modern] with two principal metaphysical frameworks[substance, event]. Problematic fin de sicle claims at the end of both the 19th and 20th centuries appear to have a common root in substance metaphysics and part/whole (...)
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  20. Brian Ellis (1957). A Comparison of Process and Non-Process Theories in the Physical Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (29):45-56.
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  21. Philippe Gagnon (2014). "Le dernier état d'un finalisme contemporain – À propos d'un inédit majeur de Raymond Ruyer" [The final status of a contemporary finalism–Concerning a major unpublished draft of Raymond Ruyer]. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 70 (2):367-378.
    This is a critical notice/review essay on *L'embryogenèse du monde et le Dieu silencieux*, a manuscript completed by Raymond Ruyer in the early 1980s. It came out as a monograph in November 2013, with the Éditions Klincksieck in Paris. It offers a presentation in an organized fashion of many aspects of his thought. Ruyer considered that a book about God could only be churned into a series of chapters on the unachievable character of our knowledge in different domains of human (...)
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  22. Philippe Gagnon (2013). Xavier Verley, Sur le Symbolisme. Cassirer, Whitehead Et Ruyer. [On Symbolism: Cassirer, Whitehead, and Ruyer.]. Process Studies 42 (2):283-288.
  23. David Ray Griffin (ed.) (1986). Physics and the Ultimate Significance of Time. State University of New York Press.
    But there is considerable consensus, even among writers who disagree radically about the ultimate significance of time so understood, that time as ...
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  24. S. O. H. (1969). Philosophy in Process, Vol. III. Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):142-142.
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  25. Xiaoqiang Han (2009). Speaking of Flux. Acta Analytica 24 (1):33-42.
    The aim of this paper is to explain how the Heraclitean doctrine of universal flux must be rejected, while the notion of flux should and can be preserved. Against the reductionist account of subjectless change, a modern version of the Heraclitean doctrine advocated by revisionist metaphysics, I argue that (1) the idea of subjectless change is one that can and should be formulated in the established conceptual framework, and (2) subjectlessness is a feature that most aptly characterizes material changes. In (...)
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  26. J. R. Hustwit, Process Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  27. Thomas Krettek (1985). Philosophy "in Process". Review of Metaphysics 39 (2):380-381.
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  28. Sacha Loeve (2011). Sensible Atoms: A Techno-Aesthetic Approach to Representation. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (2):203-222.
    This essay argues that nano-images would be best understood with an aesthetical approach rather than with an epistemological critique. For this aim, I propose a ‘techno-aesthetical’ approach: an enquiry into the way instruments and machines transform the logic of the sensible itself and not just the way by which it represents something else. Unlike critical epistemology, which remains self-evidently grounded on a representationalist philosophy, the approach developed here presents the advantage of providing a clear-cut distinction between image-as-representation and other modes (...)
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  29. Leon Niemoczynski (2014). Creative Experiencing: A Philosophy of Freedom by Charles Hartshorne (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 35 (1):85-89.
    Creative Experiencing was an unpublished manuscript found among Hartshorne’s papers now deposited at the Center for Process Studies at the Claremont School of Theology. Hartshorne mentions in the manuscript’s preface that he considered the book to be the final part of a trilogy including Creative Synthesis and Philosophic Method (1970) and Wisdom as Moderation (1987). The book was edited and published under the direction of longtime Hartshorne scholars Donald Viney and Jincheol O.“Metaphysics,” Hartshorne writes in the preface, “is the attempt (...)
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  30. Gregory Nixon (2011). Between-Two: On the Borderline of Being & Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 2 (2):150-164.
    The purpose of this review article is to attempt to come to grips with the elusive vision of Gordon Globus, especially as revealed in this, his latest book. However, one can only grip that which is tangible and solid and Globus’s marriage of Heideggerian anti-concepts and “quantum neurophilosophy” seems purposefully to evade solidity or grasp. This slippery anti-metaphysics is sometimes a curse for the reader seeking imagistic or conceptual clarity, but, on the other hand, it is also the blessing that (...)
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  31. Gregory Nixon (2009). Skrbina's *Mind That Abides: Panpsychism in the New Millennium*. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (9):116-121.
    Is the great god Pan reborn? For a while there, it seemed every intellectual movement began with the prefix ‘post’, implying non-totality, but now there are indications that ‘pan’ (all) is returning to provide another answer to one of the most basic of ontological questions: What is the relationship of mind to matter? In this important book with 17 different authors, panpsychism is given its due.
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  32. Gregory M. Nixon (2010). Whitehead & the Elusive Present: Process Philosophy's Creative Core. Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (5):625-639.
    Time’s arrow is necessary for progress from a past that has already happened to a future that is only potential until creatively determined in the present. But time’s arrow is unnecessary in Einstein’s so-called block universe, so there is no creative unfolding in an actual present. How can there be an actual present when there is no universal moment of simultaneity? Events in various places will have different presents according to the position, velocity, and nature of the perceiver. Standing against (...)
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  33. E. A. R. (1967). The Process of Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):388-389.
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  34. Steven M. Rosen (1986). Time and Higher-Order Wholeness: A Response to David Bohm. In David Ray Griffin (ed.), Physics and the Ultimate Significance of Time. State University of New York Press. 219--230.
    This paper explores the meaning of time from three points of view: (1) David Bohm's concepts of "vertical implicate order" and "holomovement"; (2) Alfred North Whitehead's idea of the "actual occasion"; and (3) the author's notion of "nondual duality." The author argues that Bohm and Whitehead alike implicitly divide time into dual and nondual aspects and that, in failing to adequately reconcile these, time, in effect, is denied. The alternative offered seeks to thoroughly integrate dual and nondual (holistic) modalities in (...)
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  35. Johanna Seibt (2009). Forms of Emergent Interaction in General Process Theory. Synthese 166 (3):479 - 512.
    General Process Theory (GPT) is a new (non-Whiteheadian) process ontology. According to GPT the domains of scientific inquiry and everyday practice consist of configurations of ‘goings-on’ or ‘dynamics’ that can be technically defined as concrete, dynamic, non-particular individuals called general processes. The paper offers a brief introduction to GPT in order to provide ontological foundations for research programs such as interactivism that centrally rely on the notions of ‘process,’ ‘interaction,’ and ‘emergence.’ I begin with an analysis of our common sense (...)
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  36. Johanna Seibt (1998). Process Metaphysics. An Introduction to Process Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 51 (3):713-714.
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  37. Wilfrid Sellars (1981). Foundations of a Matephysics of Pure Process, II: Naturalism and Process. The Monist 64 (1):37-65.
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  38. R. V. T. (1978). Philosophy in Process, Vol. 7. Review of Metaphysics 32 (1):159-160.
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  39. Frédéric Tremblay (2007). Rescher, Nicholas. Essais sur les fondements de l’ontologie du procès, traduction et introduction par Michel Weber, Ontos-Verlag, 2006. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 34 (2):419-421.
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  40. Robert E. Ulanowicz (2010). Process Ecology: Stepping Stones to Biosemiosis. Zygon 45 (2):391-407.
    Many in science are disposed not to take biosemiotics seriously, dismissing it as too anthropomorphic. Furthermore, biosemiotic apologetics are cast in top-down fashion, thereby adding to widespread skepticism. An effective response might be to approach biosemiotics from the bottom up, but the foundational assumptions that support Enlightenment science make that avenue impossible. Considerations from ecosystem studies reveal, however, that those conventional assumptions, although once possessing great utilitarian value, have come to impede deeper understanding of living systems because they implicitly depict (...)
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  41. Zhihe Wang (2002). What Can Whitehead's Philosophy Contribute to Feminism? Process Studies 31 (2):125-137.
  42. Anderson Weekes (2012). The Mind-Body Problem and Whitehead’s Nonreductive Monism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9-10):40-66.
    There have been many attempts to retire dualism from active philosophic life, replacing it with something less removed from science, but we are no closer to that goal now than fifty years ago. I propose breaking the stalemate by considering marginal perspectives that may help identify unrecognized assumptions that limit the mainstream debate. Comparison with Whitehead highlights ways that opponents of dualism continue to uphold the Cartesian “real distinction” between mind and body. Whitehead, by contrast, insists on a conceptual distinction: (...)
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  43. Amos Yong (2010). Methodologies of Comparative Philosophy: The Pragmatist and Process Traditions. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 31 (3):266-269.
    Robert Smid is senior lecturer in philosophy and religion at Curry College in Milton, Massachusetts. This book, a slightly revised version of his recent PhD dissertation from Boston University, is dedicated to Robert Cummings Neville, under whose guidance it was originally written. As the title suggests, this volume explores various methods of comparative philosophers in the pragmatist and process traditions of American philosophy. Smid thus focuses his analytic lens on William Ernest Hocking (1873–1966), F. S. C. Northrop (1893–1992), the collaborative (...)
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  44. Paul Young (1988). Philosophy in Process. Review of Metaphysics 42 (1):172-174.
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