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Siblings:History/traditions: Property
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  1. Judy Anderson (2012). Intellectual Property, Fee or Free? Journal of Information Ethics 21 (2):114-121.
  2. Antoine Barnave (1971). Power, Property, and History. New York,Harper & Row.
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  3. Jeffrey Barnouw (1983). A Discourse on Property. Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):153-154.
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  4. Kenneth Baynes (1989). Kant on Property Rights and the Social Contract. The Monist 72 (3):433-453.
  5. Lawrence C. Becker (1992). Review: Too Much Property. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (2):196 - 206.
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  6. L. Brace (2013). Inhuman Commerce: Anti-Slavery and the Ownership of Freedom. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):466-482.
    This article explores the British anti-slavery writings of the mid- to late 18th century, and the meanings which they gave to the idea of owning a property in the person. It addresses the construction of a particular moral and political landscape where freedom was understood as both a kind of property and as non-domination, and slavery was constructed as a form of theft, and as the exercise of arbitrary power. This created a complex moral space, where possession, commerce, savagery, tyranny (...)
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  7. George G. Brenkert (1979). Freedom and Private Property in Marx. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (2):122-147.
  8. Robert Castel (2002). Emergence and Transformations of Social Property. Constellations 9 (3):318-334.
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  9. Joyotpaul Chaudhuri (1971). Toward a Democratic Theory of Property and the Modern Corporation. Ethics 81 (4):271-286.
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  10. John Christman (1994). The Myth of Property: Toward an Egalitarian Theory of Ownership. OUP USA.
    The Myth of Property is the first book-length study to focus directly on the variable and complex structure of ownership. It critically analyses what it means to own something, and it takes familiar debates about distributive justice and recasts them into discussions of the structure of ownership. The traditional notion of private property assumed by both defenders and opponents of that system is criticized and exposed as a "myth." The book then puts forward a new theory of what it means (...)
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  11. Steven Curry (2006). The Politics of Property, Labour, Freedom and Belonging. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):105-108.
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  12. James W. Ely (2012). The Progressive Era Assault on Individualism and Property Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):255-282.
    This essay examines the far-reaching attack on individualism and property rights which characterized the Progressive Era of the early twentieth century. Scholars and political figures associated with Progressivism criticized the individualist values of classical liberalism and rejected the traditional notion of limited government espoused by the framers of the Constitution. They expressed great confidence in regulatory agencies, staffed by experts, to effectuate policy. Progressives paved the way for the later triumph of statist ideology with the New Deal in the 1930s.
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  13. Ian Fraser (2006). The Politics of Property, Labour, Freedom and Belonging. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):105.
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  14. Axel Gosseries (2005). The Myth of Ownership: Taxes and Justice, by Liam Murphy and Thomas Nagel. Disputatio.
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  15. J. W. Harris (2002). Property and Justice. OUP Oxford.
    When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules we do not know if they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'. -/- Bridging the gulf between juristic writing on property and speculations about it appearing in the tradition of western political philosophy, Professor Harris has built from entirely (...)
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  16. Michael W. Howard (2003). Libertarianism, Worker Ownership, and Wage Slavery: A Critique of Ellerman's Labor Theory of Property. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (2):169–187.
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  17. J. F. Humphrey (2010). Reflections on the Economic Crisis. The Transcendental Character of Money: An Exposition of Karl Marx’s Argument in the Grundrisse. Nordicum-Mediterraneum, Vol. 5, No. 1 (March 2010) 5 (1).
    An exposition of Karl Marx’s argument in the Grundrisse for the logical development of money, this essay is divided into three parts. Since Marx is concerned to distinguish himself and his method from that of the seventeenth century political economists, I begin my paper with a brief reflection on “the scientifically correct method” or the “theoretical method” (Grundrisse 101 and 102). The second part of this paper considers how Marx justifies beginning his reflection with the concept of production in general. (...)
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  18. David James (2010). Fichte's Theory of Property. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):202-217.
    I discuss J. G. Fichte’s theory of property and its implications in relation to the claim made by C. B. Macpherson that, by broadening the meaning of the term ‘property’, it becomes possible to reconcile two principles of liberal democratic theory that seem to be at odds with each other: the right to property, understood as the right to exclude others from the use or benefit of something, and the right to use and develop one’s capacities. I argue that Fichte’s (...)
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  19. John King-Farlow (1964). The Concept of 'Mine'. Inquiry 7 (1-4):268 – 276.
    Misunderstanding of the word mine and its shifting relations to 'pro-attitudes' inspired much of Aristotle's attack on collectivism at Politics 1261B 15ff. Similar misunderstandings contribute to certain criticisms leveled by modern conservatives like Goldwater against 'welfarism', they presuppose confused psychological and ethical doctrines. Thus semantically necessary truths may be misconstrued as entailing contingent propositions about political and economic arrangements. Different confusions about mine and 'pro-attitudes' lend a correspondingly specious aura of certainty to some Platonic and Marxist claims. The ownership model (...)
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  20. Matthew Lister (2011). Review of Gerald Gaus, The Order of Public Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.
  21. Richard McKeon (1938). The Development of the Concept of Property in Political Philosophy: A Study of the Background of the Constitution. Ethics 48 (3):297-366.
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  22. John M. Meyer (2009). The Concept of Private Property and the Limits of the Environmental Imagination. Political Theory 37 (1):99 - 127.
    An absolutist concept of property has the power to shape and constrain the public imagination. Libertarian theorists normatively embrace this concept. Yet its influence extends far beyond these proponents, shaping the views of an otherwise diverse array of theorists and activists. This limits the ability of environmentalists, among others, to respond coherently to challenges from property rights advocates in the U.S. I sketch an alternative concept--rooted in practice--that understands private property as necessarily embedded in social and ecological relations, rather than (...)
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  23. Marcus Ohlström, Marco Solinas & Olivier Voirol (2010). Redistribuzione o riconoscimento? di Nancy Fraser e Axel Honneth. Iride 23 (2):443-460.
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  24. Michael Otsuka, Too Much Property.
    Mike Otsukaʼs book aspires to do more than its title discloses. Libertarianism without Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2003) does not merely aim to reconcile liberty and equality (that is handled without remainder in the first chapter) but to draw the outlines of a complete, and distinctly Lockean, political theory. Rather than starting from first principles, Otsuka explores several specific issues only loosely connected to each other, hoping that these might add up to a complete political vision. Though the discussion is (...)
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  25. Lynn Sharp Paine (1991). Trade Secrets and the Justification of Intellectual Property: A Comment on Hettinger. Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (3):247-263.
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  26. Tom G. Palmer (1998). G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality. Critical Review 12 (3):225-251.
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support his egalitarian conclusions, (...)
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  27. Anne Phillips (2011). It's My Body and I'll Do What I Like With It: Bodies as Objects and Property. Political Theory 39 (6):724 - 748.
    What, if any, is the problem with treating bodies as objects or property? Is there a defensible basis for seeing bodies as different from "other" material resources? Or is thinking the body special a kind of sentimentalism that blocks clear thinking about matters such as prostitution, surrogate motherhood, and the sale of spare kidneys? I argue that the language we use does matter, and that thinking of the body as property encourages a self/body dualism that obscures the power relations involved (...)
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  28. Adrian Piper (1980). Property and the Limits of the Self. Political Theory 8 (1):39 - 64.
    THE MAIN OBJECTIVES of the following discussions are, first, to show the logical inconsistency of Hegel’s theory of the necessity of private property and, second, to show its exegetical inconsistency with the most plausible and consistent interpretations of Hegel’s theory of the self and its relation to the state in Ethical Life. I begin with the latter objective, by distinguishing three basic conceptions of the self that can be gleaned from various passages in the Philosophy of Right. I suggest viable (...)
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  29. Adrian M. S. Piper (1980). Property and the Limits of the Self. Political Theory 8 (1):39-64.
    THE MAIN OBJECTIVES of the following discussions are, first, to show the logical inconsistency of Hegel’s theory of the necessity of private property and, second, to show its exegetical inconsistency with the most plausible and consistent interpretations of Hegel’s theory of the self and its relation to the state in Ethical Life. I begin with the latter objective, by distinguishing three basic conceptions of the self that can be gleaned from various passages in the Philosophy of Right. I suggest viable (...)
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  30. Dusan Pokorny (2002). Property, Culture, and Cultural Property. Constellations 9 (3):356-374.
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  31. Paul A. Rahe (2005). The Political Needs of a Toolmaking Animal: Madison, Hamilton, Locke, and the Question of Property. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):1-26.
    When Benjamin Franklin suggested that man is by nature a tool-making animal, he summed up what was for his fellow Americans the common sense of the matter. It is not, then, surprising that, when Britain's colonists in North America broke with the mother country over the issue of an unrepresentative parliament's right to tax and govern the colonies, they defended their right to the property they owned on the ground that it was in a most thorough-going sense an extension of (...)
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  32. Michaela Rehm (2005). „Ihr seid verloren, wenn ihr vergeßt, daß die Früchte allen gehören und die Erde niemandem“: Rousseaus Eigentumskonzeption,. In Bernd Ludwig & Andreas Eckl (eds.), Was ist mein? Beck. 103-117.
    The paper is an analysis of Rousseau’s concept of property. It shows that Rousseau wants to draft a new system of politics that will not forbid private property but will limit its scale. It aims to clarify that Rousseau owes much to John Locke’s theory and even adopts Locke’s definition that it is a basic purpose of the social contract to protect the citizen’s property. It is argued that in spite of these similarities Rousseau’s account differs fundamentally from Locke’s. Having (...)
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  33. Michaela Rehm & Bernd Ludwig (eds.) (2012). John Locke, „Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung“. Akademie-Verlag.
    Even his peers called Locke's political philosophy “The ABC of Politics“: not only does he clarify why one should exit the state of nature (government guarantees protection of life, freedom, and wealth) but also what a good government has to provide. A government should protect individuals from assaults of fellow citizens, other countries, and itself. Locke also shows how to put limits to the power of political institutions: by division of powers, by law, by neutral judges, and by making people (...)
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  34. Patrick Riley (1978). On Susan Shell's "Kant's Theory of Property". Political Theory 6 (1):91-99.
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  35. Patricia Roche (2010). The Property/Privacy Conundrum Over Human Tissue. HEC Forum 22 (3):197-209.
    This paper analyzes court rulings on tissue samples as property and critiques objections that have been raised to the recognition of DNA samples as personal property. The cases are: Moore v. Regents of the University of California (1988, 1990), Greenberg v. Miami Children’s Research Institute (2003), and Washington University v.Catalona (2007). The paper argues that it is possible for the law to support both individual privacy and property rights in DNA, recognizing nevertheless that some unresolved questions remain, including what exercising (...)
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  36. John Salter (2001). Hugo Grotius: Property and Consent. Political Theory 29 (4):537-555.
  37. Benoy Kumar Sarkar (1920). The Theory of Property, Law, and Social Order in Hindu Political Philosophy. International Journal of Ethics 30 (3):311-325.
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  38. David Schmidtz (1995). Book Review:The Myth of Property: Toward an Egalitarian Theory of Ownership. John Christman. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (1):200-.
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  39. Ayelet Shachar & Ran Hirschl (2007). Citizenship as Inherited Property. Political Theory 35 (3):253 - 287.
    The global distributive implications of automatically allocating political membership according to territoriality (jus soli) and parentage (jus sanguinis) principles have largely escaped critical scrutiny. This article begins to address this considerable gap. Securing membership status in a given state or region--with its specific level of wealth, degree of stability, and human rights record--is a crucial factor in the determination of life chances. However, birthright entitlements still dominate both our imagination and our laws in the allotment of political membership to a (...)
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  40. Susan Meld Shell (1979). On Riley's Response to Shell's Essay, "Kant's Theory of Property". Political Theory 7 (1):143-144.
  41. Susan Meld Shell (1978). Kant's Theory of Property. Political Theory 6 (1):75-90.
  42. Matt Silliman (1991). Jefferson and Locke on Equality and Property. Social Philosophy Today 5:301-316.
  43. A. J. Skillen (1985). Property and Political Theory By Alan Ryan Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1984, 198 Pp., £ 15.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 60 (234):554-.
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  44. Barry Smith & Leo Zaibert (1996). Prolegomena to a Metaphysics of Real Estate. In Roberto Casati (ed.), Shadows and Socio-Economic Units. Foundations of Formal Geography. Technical University of Vienna. 151--155.
    As an object in which property rights can be invested, land is a peculiar hybrid structure that comprehends both spatial and non-spatial aspects. Even in its purely spatial aspect land is treated differently from culture to culture, thus for example in the degree to which property rights in land are held to relate to vague or precisely delineated parcels and to portions of space above and below the surface of the earth. When we examine the non-spatial aspects of landed property, (...)
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  45. Janet Farrell Smith (1986). Possessive Power. Hypatia 1 (2):103 - 120.
    The concept of possessive power as it manifests in reproductions is the focus of criticism in this paper. The analysis utilizes both positive insights and illustrative mistakes from Beauvoir's account of maternity. An alternative notion of power is proposed to replace possessive power as proprietary control.
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  46. James Tully (1980). A Discourse on Property: John Locke and His Adversaries. Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke's theory of property is perhaps the most distinctive and the most influential aspect of his political theory. In this book James Tully uses an hermeneutical and analytical approach to offer a revolutionary revision of early modern theories of property, focusing particularly on that of Locke. Setting his analysis within the intellectual context of the seventeenth century, Professor Tully overturns the standard interpretations of Locke's theory, showing that it is not a justification of private property. Instead he shows it (...)
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  47. Peter Vallentyne (1995). Review: The Myth of Property. [REVIEW] Mind 104 (415):622-624.
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  48. Gijs Van Donselaar (2009). The Right to Exploit: Parasitism, Scarcity, and Basic Income. OUP USA.
    In 1895 an English farmer diverted the course of a stream that was flowing through his land, thereby cutting off the supply to the water reservoir of the neighboring community. The courts established that it had been his purpose to "injure the plaintiffs by carrying off the water and to compel them to buy him off." Regardless of what the law says, most people will feel that the farmer's intentions were morally unjust; he was trying to abuse his property rights (...)
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  49. Bas Vossen (2014). Imposing Duties and Original Appropriation. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (2).
  50. Bas Vossen (2014). Imposing Duties and Original Appropriation. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (2):n/a-n/a.
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