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  1. Sabina Alam, Jigisha Patel & James Giordano (2012). Working Towards a New Psychiatry - Neuroscience, Technology and the DSM-5. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-.
    This Editorial introduces the thematic series on 'Toward a New Psychiatry: Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Classification, Diagnosis and Care' http://www.biomedcentral.com/series/newpsychiatry.
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  2. S. Alexander Weinstock (1965). The Medical Model in Psychopathology. Diogenes 13 (52):14-25.
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  3. Massimiliano Aragona (2009). About and Beyond Comorbidity: Does the Crisis of the DSM Bring on a Radical Rethinking of Descriptive Psychopathology? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):29-33.
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  4. Massimiliano Aragona (2009). The Role of Comorbidity in the Crisis of the Current Psychiatric Classification System. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):1-11.
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  5. Katherine Arens (1996). Commentary on "Lumps and Bumps&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (1):15-16.
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  6. Nomy Arpaly (2005). How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes&Quot;: Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
  7. Alan Baddeley (2007). Working Memory, Thought, and Action. OUP Oxford.
    'Working Memory, Thought, and Action' is the magnum opus of one of the most influential cognitive psychologists of the past 50 years. This new volume on the model he created (with Graham Hitch) discusses the developments that have occurred within the model in the past twenty years, and places it within a broader context. -/- Working memory is a temporary storage system that underpins our capacity for coherent thought. Some 30 years ago, Baddeley and Hitch proposed a way of thinking (...)
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  8. Gillian Bendelow (2004). Sociology and Concepts of Mental Illness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):145-146.
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  9. G. E. Berrios (1996). The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology Since the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Since psychiatry remains a descriptive discipline, it is essential for its practitioners to understand how the language of psychiatry came to be formed. This important book, written by a psychiatrist-historian, traces the genesis of the descriptive categories of psychopathology and examines their interaction with the psychological and philosophical context within which they arose. The author explores particularly the language and ideas that have characterised descriptive psychopathology from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. He presents a masterful survey of the (...)
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  10. Wolfgang Blankenburg (1980). Phenomenology and Psychopathology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 11 (2):50-78.
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  11. Wolfgang Blankenburg & Aaron L. Mishara (2001). First Steps Toward a Psychopathology of "Common Sense&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):303-315.
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  12. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
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  13. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
  14. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Freud as an 'Evolutionary Psychiatrist' and the Foundations of a Freudian Philosophy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):315-324.
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  15. L. Bortolotti (2009). Review: Rachel Cooper: Psychiatry and Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (469):163-166.
  16. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). Psychiatric Classification and Diagnosis. Delusions and Confabulations. Paradigmi (1):99-112.
    In psychiatry some disorders of cognition are distinguished from instances of normal cognitive functioning and from other disorders in virtue of their surface features rather than in virtue of the underlying mechanisms responsible for their occurrence. Aetiological considerations often cannot play a significant classificatory and diagnostic role, because there is no sufficient knowledge or consensus about the causal history of many psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it is not always possible to uniquely identify a pathological behaviour as the symptom of a certain (...)
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  17. Pascal Boyer (2011). Intuitive Expectations and the Detection of Mental Disorder: A Cognitive Background to Folk-Psychiatries. Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):95-118.
  18. Pat Bracken & Philip Thomas (2010). From Szasz to Foucault: On the Role of Critical Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):219-228.
    Because psychiatry deals specifically with ‘mental’ suffering, its efforts are always centrally involved with the meaningful world of human reality. As such, it sits at the interface of a number of discourses: genetics and neuroscience, psychology and sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and the humanities. Each of these provides frameworks, concepts, and examples that seek to assist our attempts to understand mental distress and how it might be helped. However, these discourses work with different assumptions, methodologies, values, and priorities. Some are in (...)
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  19. David H. Brendel (2003). A Pragmatic Consideration of the Relation Between Depression and Melancholia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):53-55.
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  20. Matthew Broome (2007). Taxonomy and Ontology in Psychiatry: A Survey of Recent Literature. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):303-319.
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  21. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (2010). What's Wrong with 'Mental' Disorders? Psychological Medicine.
    Commentary on the editorial by D Stein et al.'s "What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V".
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  22. Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith (2010). Foundations for a Realist Ontology of Mental Disease. Journal of Biomedical Semantics 1 (10):1-23.
    While classifications of mental disorders have existed for over one hundred years, it still remains unspecified what terms such as 'mental disorder', 'disease' and 'illness' might actually denote. While ontologies have been called in aid to address this shortfall since the GALEN project of the early 1990s, most attempts thus far have sought to provide a formal description of the structure of some pre-existing terminology or classification, rather than of the corresponding structures and processes on the side of the patient. (...)
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  23. T. S. Champlin (1989). The Causation of Mental Illness. Philosophical Investigations 12 (1):14-32.
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  24. Louis C. Charland (2010). Medical or Moral Kinds? Moving Beyond a False Dichotomy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):119-125.
    I am delighted that Zachar and Potter have chosen to refer to my work on the DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders in their very interesting and ambitious target article. Their suggestion that we turn to virtue ethics rather than traditional moral theory to understand the relation between moral and nonmoral factors in personality disorders is certainly original and worth pursuing. Yet, in the final instance, I am not entirely sure about the exact scope of their proposed analysis. I also worry (...)
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  25. Louis C. Charland (2004). A Madness for Identity: Psychiatric Labels, Consumer Autonomy, and the Perils of the Internet. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):335-349.
  26. Man Cheung Chung, Bill Fulford & George Graham (eds.) (2006). Reconceiving Schizophrenia. OUP Oxford.
    Schizophrenia arguably is the most troubling, puzzling, and complex mental illness. No single discipline is equipped to understand it. Though schizophrenia has been investigated predominately from psychological, psychiatric and neurobiological perspectives, few attempts have been made to apply the tool kit of philosophy to schizophrenia, the mix of global analysis, conceptual insight, and argumentative clarity that is indicative of a philosophical perspective. This book is a major effort at redressing that imbalance. Recent developments in the area of philosophy known as (...)
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  27. Rachel Cooper (2014). Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Karnac.
    Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Karnac, 2014) evaluates the latest edition of the D.S.M.The publication of D.S.M-5 in 2013 brought many changes. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders asks whether the D.S.M.-5 classifies the right people in the right way. It is aimed at patients, mental health professionals, and academics with an interest in mental health. Issues addressed include: How is the D.S.M. affected by financial links with the pharmaceutical industry? To what extent (...)
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  28. Rachel Cooper (2004). What is Wrong with the DSM? History of Psychiatry 15 (1):5-25.
    The DSM is the main classification of mental disorders used by psychiatrists in the United States and, increasingly, around the world. Although widely used, the DSM has come in for fierce criticism, with many commentators believing it to be conceptually flawed in a variety of ways. This paper assesses some of these philosophical worries. The first half of the paper asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that ‘cuts nature at the joints’ makes sense. What is (...)
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  29. A. J. J. de Koning & F. A. Jenner (eds.) (1982). Phenomenology and Psychiatry. Grune & Stratton.
  30. Damiaan Denys (2011). Obsessionality & Compulsivity: A Phenomenology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):3-.
    Progress in psychiatry depends on accurate definitions of disorders. As long as there are no known biologic markers available that are highly specific for a particular psychiatric disorder, clinical practice as well as scientific research is forced to appeal to clinical symptoms. Currently, the nosology of obsessive-compulsive disorder is being reconsidered in view of the publication of DSM-V. Since our diagnostic entities are often simplifications of the complicated clinical profile of patients, definitions of psychiatric disorders are imprecise and always indeterminate. (...)
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  31. Craig Edwards (2009). Ethical Decisions in the Classification of Mental Conditions as Mental Illness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):73-90.
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  32. Rudi Fischer (1994). Is There Any Logic in Madness? Linguistic Reflections on an Interpersonal Theory of Mental Illness. Wittgenstein Studien 1 (1).
  33. Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield (2008). Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):249-269.
  34. Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield (2008). Should Clinicians' Views of Mental Illness Influence the DSM? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):285-287.
  35. Antony G. N. Flew (1981). Concepts Of Health And Disease. Reading: Addison-Wesley.
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  36. Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu (2010). A Liberal Account of Addiction. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):1-22.
    Philosophers and psychologists have been attracted to two differing accounts of addictive motivation. In this paper, we investigate these two accounts and challenge their mutual claim that addictions compromise a person’s self-control. First, we identify some incompatibilities between this claim of reduced self-control and the available evidence from various disciplines. A critical assessment of the evidence weakens the empirical argument for reduced autonomy. Second, we identify sources of unwarranted normative bias in the popular theories of addiction that introduce systematic errors (...)
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  37. K. W. M. Fulford (2006). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around a series (...)
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  38. K. W. M. Fulford & Anthony Colombo (2004). Six Models of Mental Disorder: A Study Combining Linguistic-Analytic and Empirical Methods. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):129-144.
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  39. K. W. M. Fulford & Mike Jackson (1997). Response to the Commentaries. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):87-90.
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  40. Alfredo Gaete (2009). The Concept of Mental Disorder: A Proposal. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):327-339.
    During the last years, there has been an important discussion on the concept of mental disorder. Several accounts of such a concept have been offered by theorists, although neither of these accounts seems to have successfully answered both the question of what it means for a certain mental condition to be a disorder and the question of what it means for a certain disorder to be mental. In this paper, I propose an account of the concept of mental disorder that, (...)
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  41. Francis Golffing (1963). Book Review:The Myth of Mental Illness. Thomas S. Szasz. [REVIEW] Ethics 73 (2):145-.
  42. Mona Gupta & L. Rex Kay (2002). Phenomenological Methods in Psychiatry: A Necessary First Step. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):93-96.
  43. Mona Gupta & L. Rex Kay (2002). The Impact of "Phenomenology" on North American Psychiatric Assessment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):73-85.
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  44. Samuel B. Guze (1992). Why Psychiatry is a Branch of Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    Advance Praise: "A distillation of the wisdom accumulated over a lifetime by one of our leading thinkers in psychiatry. . . .It should interest. . .anyone who has thought seriously about the brain, the mind and the meaning of illness." --Albert J. Stunkard, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania.
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  45. Ian Hacking (2007). Kinds of People: Moving Targets. Proceedings of the British Academy 151:285-318.
  46. Ian Hacking (1999). The Social Construction of What? Harvard University Press.
    Especially troublesome in this dispute is the status of the natural sciences, and this is where Hacking finds some of his most telling cases, from the conflict ...
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  47. Alastair Hannay (1972). Mental Illness and thelebensweltA Discussion of Maurice Natanson (Ed.),Psychiatry and Philosophy∗. Inquiry 15 (1-4):208-230.
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  48. Nick Haslam (2002). Kinds of Kinds: A Conceptual Taxonomy of Psychiatric Categories. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):203-217.
    A pluralistic view of psychiatric classification is defended, according to which psychiatric categories take a variety of structural forms. An ordered taxonomy of these forms—non-kinds, practical kinds, fuzzy kinds, discrete kinds, and natural kinds—is presented and exemplified. It is argued that psychiatric categories cannot all be understood as pragmatically grounded, and at least some reflect naturally occurring discontinuities without thereby representing natural kinds. Even if essentialist accounts of mental disorders are generally mistaken, they are not implied whenever a psychiatric category (...)
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  49. Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Mark Jensen, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (2012). Representing Mental Functioning: Ontologies for Mental Health and Disease. In Towards an Ontology of Mental Functioning (ICBO Workshop), Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology.
    Mental and behavioral disorders represent a significant portion of the public health burden in all countries. The human cost of these disorders is immense, yet treatment options for sufferers are currently limited, with many patients failing to respond sufficiently to available interventions and drugs. High quality ontologies facilitate data aggregation and comparison across different disciplines, and may therefore speed up the translation of primary research into novel therapeutics. Realism-based ontologies describe entities in reality and the relationships between them in such (...)
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  50. John Horgan (2001). Precis of the Undiscovered Mind: How the Human Brain Defies Replication, Medication, and Explanation. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 2 (2):215-225.
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