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  1. M. Ainsworth, St Augustine, F. Bacon, A. Bandura, D. Baumrind, E. G. Boring, J. Bowlby, T. Brake, S. Brent & O. G. Brim (1983). Behaviorism, and Realism, 233 Berkeley, 206 Bernoulli, 125, 126 Bias, its Role in Selection of Events, 32 Biological Approach to Development, 90, 91. [REVIEW] In Richard M. Lerner (ed.), Developmental Psychology: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. L. Erlbaum Associates 267.
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  2. E. Airapetyantz & K. Bykov (1945). Physiological Experiments and the Psychology of the Subconscious. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (4):577-593.
  3. A. Alexieva & N. A. Nicolov (1989). Brain Mechanisms in Classical Conditioning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):137.
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  4. Guy Axtell, Thinking Twice About Virtue and Vice.
    This chapter provides an empirical defense of credit theories of knowing against Alfano’s the-ses of inferential cognitive situationism and of epistemic situationism. It also develops a Nar-row-Broad Spectrum of agency-ascriptions in reply to Olin and Doris’ ‘trade-off problem.’ In order to support the claim that credit theories can treat many cases of success through heuristic cognitive strategies as credit-conferring, the paper develops the compatibility between VE and dual-process theories (DPT) in cognitive psychology. A genuine convergence between VE and DPT is (...)
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  5. William M. Baum (2005). Understanding Behaviorism: Behavior, Culture, and Evolution. Blackwell.
    Understanding Behaviorism explains the basis of behavior analysis and its application to human problems in a scholarly but accessible manner. Behaviorism is defined as the proposition that a science of behavior is possible, and the book begins by exploring the question of whether behavior is free or determined, relating behaviorism to pragmatism, and showing how feelings and thoughts can be treated scientifically. Baum then discusses ancient concepts such as purpose, knowledge, and thought, as well as social problems such as freedom, (...)
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  6. Mecca Chiesa (1994). Radical Behaviorism: The Philosophy and the Science. Authors Cooperative.
    To a greater extent than any other behavioral formulation, Radical Behaviorism has abandoned mechanistic explanation. Like Darwin, B.F. Skinner adopted selection as a causal mode. He applied that mode himself to the behavior of the individual, pointing out but leaving it to others to unravel the causal role of selection in the behavior of a social culture. Also, Radical Behaviorism parts company with traditional behaviorists who pronounce private experience and thinking to be outside the domain of science. Misconceptions, misinterpretations, and (...)
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  7. Arturo Clavijo A. (2006). Más Allá Del Fantasma En la Máquina. Universidad Nacional de Colombia.
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  8. Roberto Cordeschi (2006). Simulation Models of Organism Behavior: Some Lessons From Precybernetic and Cybernetic Approaches. In S. Termini (ed.), Imagination and Rigor: Essays on Eduardo R. Caianiello’s Scientific Heritage. Springer
    The rise and some more recent developments of the machine-simulation methodology of living-organism behavior are discussed in this paper. In putting forward these issue, my aim is that of isolating recurring themes which help understanding the development of such a machine-simulation methodology, from its, so to speak, discovery during the first half of the twentieth century up to the present time. The machine designed by the engineer S. Bent Russell in 1913 seems to share the core of at least some (...)
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  9. Roberto Cordeschi (1991). The Discovery of the Artificial: Some Protocybernetic Developments 1930-1940. Artificial Intelligence and Society 5 (3):218-238.
    In this paper I start from a definition of “culture of the artificial” which might be stated by referring to the background of philosophical, methodological, pragmatical assumptions which characterizes the development of the information processing analysis of mental processes and of some trends in contemporary cognitive science: in a word, the development of AI as a candidate science of mind. The aim of this paper is to show how (with which plausibility and limitations) the discovery of the mentioned background might (...)
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  10. Bengo Domingos dos Santos S., Psicologias – Uma Introdução ao estudo da psicologia.
    Há de entre as ciências, uma que ainda carrega vestígios muito visíveis que denunciam seus vínculos familiares com a mãe. Essa ciência cujos precursores ainda revelam-se sagazes pensadores, capazes de construir conhecimento, e não perpetuadores de uma escola especializada em ordenar e classificar a realidade. Essa ciência, é a ciência Psicológica. PSICOLOGIAS é uma introdução ao estudo da Psicologia, apresentada em seus vários aspetos: história, temas básicos, áreas de conhecimento, principais características da profissão, análises de temas cotidianos (vistos sob a (...)
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  11. W. Frank Epling (1984). On the Persistence of Cognitive. Behaviorism 12 (1):15-27.
    Skinner has assigned the persistence of cognitive explanations to the literature of freedom and dignity. This view is challenged especially as it applies to behavioral scientists. It is argued that cognitive explanations persist (a) because current behaviorism does not challenge cognitive epistomology; (b) because behavior analysts have failed to provide research evidence at the level of human behavior, and finally (c) because a science of behavior based solely on op?rant principles is necessarily incomplete. The implications of these problems for behavior (...)
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  12. Richard Garrett (1979). Value Conflict in a Skinnerian Analysis. Behaviorism 7 (1):9-16.
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  13. F. Güell (2014). The Liberating Dimension of Human Habit in Addiction Context. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8 (664).
  14. Peter Harzem & Thomas Miles (1978). Conceptual Issues in Operant Psychology. Wiley.
    This book combines ideas from two separate sources. The first of these is the total body of research which comes under the head of operant psychology and which owes its origin primarily to B. F. Skinner. The second is the set of techniques which have been developed in philosophy in the last 50 years and which are associated in particular with the names of Ludwig Wittgenstein, J. L. Austin, and Gilbert Ryle. Our main task will be to make use of (...)
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  15. Gary Hatfield (2009). Psychology in Philosophy: Historical Perspectives. In Sara Heinamaa & Martina Reuter (eds.), Psychology and Philosophy: Inquiries into the Soul from Late Scholasticism to Contemporary Thought. Springer 1-25.
    The chapter examines some common assumptions regarding the shape of the history of theories of mind. It questions the conception that the Scientific Revolution resulted in placing the mind “outside of nature.” During the seventeenth century, the followers of Descartes routinely placed study of the mind, or, at least, mind–body interaction, within “physics” considered as a science of nature in general (and so including physics in the narrow sense, biology, and psychology). By the end of the eighteenth century, many authors (...)
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  16. Gary Hatfield (2008). Mental Acts and Mechanistic Psychology in Descartes' Passions. In Neil Robertson, Gordon McOuat & Tom Vinci (eds.), Descartes and the Modern. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 49-71.
    This chapter examines the mechanistic psychology of Descartes in the _Passions_, while also drawing on the _Treatise on Man_. It develops the idea of a Cartesian “psychology” that relies on purely bodily mechanisms by showing that he explained some behaviorally appropriate responses through bodily mechanisms alone and that he envisioned the tailoring of such responses to environmental circumstances through a purely corporeal “memory.” An animal’s adjustment of behavior as caused by recurring patterns of sensory stimulation falls under the notion of (...)
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  17. Gary Hatfield (2007). The Passions of the Soul and Descartes's Machine Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):1-35.
    Descartes developed an elaborate theory of animal physiology that he used to explain functionally organized, situationally adapted behavior in both human and nonhuman animals. Although he restricted true mentality to the human soul, I argue that he developed a purely mechanistic (or material) ‘psychology’ of sensory, motor, and low-level cognitive functions. In effect, he sought to mechanize the offices of the Aristotelian sensitive soul. He described the basic mechanisms in the Treatise on man, which he summarized in the Discourse. However, (...)
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  18. Gary Hatfield (2003). Behaviourism and Psychology. In Thomas Baldwin (ed.), Cambridge History of Philosophy, 1870–1945. Cambridge University Press 640-48.
    Behaviorism was a peculiarly American phenomenon. As a school of psychology it was founded by John B. Watson (1878-1958) and grew into the neobehaviorisms of the 1920s, 30s and 40s. Philosophers were involved from the start, prefiguring the movement and endeavoring to define or redefine its tenets. Behaviorism expressed the naturalistic bent in American thought, which came in response to the prevailing philosophical idealism and was inspired by developments in natural science itself. There were several versions of naturalism in American (...)
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  19. Russell Keat (1972). A Critical Examination of BF Skinner's Objections to Mentalism. Behaviorism 1 (1):53-70.
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  20. Kennon A. Lattal (ed.) (2003). Behavior Theory and Philosophy. Springer.
    This volume has three goals with respect to the interplay between philosophy and behavioral psychology's experimental, applied, and interpretive levels of knowing. It aims to examine core principles in the philosophy of science, as they are interpreted by and relate to behavioral psychology; how these core principles interact with different problem areas in the study of human behavior; and how experimental, applied, and interpretive analyses complement one another to advance the understanding of behavior and, in so doing, also the philosophy (...)
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  21. Stephen LeDoux (1993). About Behaviorology: An Introduction to the Incompatible Paradigms and Historical and Philosophical Developments Among Disciplines Addressing the Behavior of Individuals. Abcs.
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  22. Vicki L. Lee (1988). Beyond Behaviorism. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    Beyond Behaviorism explores and contrasts means and ends psychology with conventional psychology -- that of stimuli and response. The author develops this comparison by exploring the general nature of psychological phenomena and clarifying many persistent doubts about psychology. Dr. Lee contrasts conventional psychology (stimuli and responses) involving reductionistic, organocentric, and mechanistic metatheory with alternative psychology (means and ends) that is autonomous, contextual, and evolutionary.
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  23. Christian List (2003). Are Interpersonal Comparisons of Utility Indeterminate? Erkenntnis 58 (2):229 - 260.
    On the orthodox view in economics, interpersonal comparisons of utilityare not empirically meaningful, and ``hence'' impossible. To reassess this view, this paper draws onthe parallels between the problem of interpersonal comparisons of utility and the problem of translation of linguisticmeaning, as explored by Quine. I discuss several cases of what the empirical evidence for interpersonal comparisonsof utility might be and show that, even on the strongest of these, interpersonal comparisons are empiricallyunderdetermined and, if we also deny any appropriate truth of (...)
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  24. Christian List & Franz Dietrich (forthcoming). Mentalism Versus Behaviourism in Economics: A Philosophy-of-Science Perspective. Economics and Philosophy.
    Behaviourism is the view that preferences, beliefs, and other mental states in social-scientific theories are nothing but constructs re-describing people's behaviour. Mentalism is the view that they capture real phenomena, on a par with the unobservables in science, such as electrons and electromagnetic fields. While behaviourism has gone out of fashion in psychology, it remains influential in economics, especially in ‘ revealed preference ’ theory. We defend mentalism in economics, construed as a positive science, and show that it (...)
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  25. Gerhard Meisenberg (2007). In God's Image: The Natural History of Intelligence and Ethics. Book Guild Pub..
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  26. Jay Moore (2008). Conceptual Foundations of Radical Behaviorism. Sloan Pub..
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  27. Howard Rachlin (1994). Behavior and Mind: The Roots of Modern Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This book attempts to synthesize two apparently contradictory views of psychology: as the science of internal mental mechanisms and as the science of complex external behavior. Most books in the psychology and philosophy of mind reject one approach while championing the other, but Rachlin argues that the two approaches are complementary rather than contradictory. Rejection of either involves disregarding vast sources of information vital to solving pressing human problems--in the areas of addiction, mental illness, education, crime, and decision-making, to name (...)
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  28. Walter B. Roettger (1977). Parsons, Behavioralism, and the Notion of Responsibility. Emporia State University.
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  29. B. F. Skinner (1974). Behaviorism at Fifty. New York,J. Norton Publishers.
    Each of us is uniquely subject to certain kinds of stimulation from a small part of the universe within our skins. Mentalistic psychologies insist that other kinds of events, lacking the physical dimensions of stimuli, are accessible to the owner of the skin within which they occur. One solution often regarded as behavioristic, granting the distinction between public and private events and ruling the latter out of consideration, has not been successful. A science of behavior must face the problem of (...)
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  30. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1989). Experience and Theory as Determinants of Attitudes Toward Mental Representation: The Case of Knight Dunlap and the Vanishing Images of J.B. Watson. Philosophical Explorations.
    Galton and subsequent investigators find wide divergences in people's subjective reports of mental imagery. Such individual differences might be taken to explain the peculiarly irreconcilable disputes over the nature and cognitive significance of imagery which have periodically broken out among psychologists and philosophers. However, to so explain these disputes is itself to take a substantive and questionable position on the cognitive role of imagery. This article distinguishes three separable issues over which people can be "for" or "against" mental images. Conflation (...)
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  31. Bruce A. Thyer (ed.) (1999). The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism is the first book to describe the unique contributions of a behavioral perspective to the major issues of philosophy. Leading behavioral philosophers and psychologists have contributed chapters on: the origins of behaviorism as a philosophy of science; the basic principles of behaviorism; ontology; epistemology; values and ethics; free will, determinism and self-control; and language and verbal behavior. A concluding chapter provides an overview of some scholarly criticisms of behavioral philosophy. Far from espousing a `black box' (...)
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  32. Stephen C. Yanchar (1998). Review of Behavior and Personality: Psychological Behaviorism. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):61-69.
    Reviews the book, Behavior and personality: Psychological behaviorism by Arthur W. Staats . Staats' latest book provides a brief introduction to his philosophy of science known as unified positivism and a comprehensive review of his specific theory known as psychological behaviorism . Readers unfamiliar with Staats' work can, through this book, become acquainted with his earnest, if not somewhat totalitarian, strategy for uniting psychology under a single theoretical framework. Although Staats' earlier publications provide a more clear and accessible exposition of (...)
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  33. G. E. Zuriff (1985). Behaviorism: A Conceptual Reconstruction. Columbia University Press.
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