About this topic
Summary The term "psychopathology" is used in a variety of contexts in philosophy of psychiatry. Broadly put, it refers to the philosophical and scientific study of mental disorders. It is also used, however, to denote behaviors or symptoms that are indicative of mental illness, such as hallucinations.
Key works Maibom 2008 Graham 1999 Poland et al 1994
Introductions Poland et al 1994
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  1. Hanna Aronsson (2011). Sexual Imprinting and Fetishism: An Evolutionary Hypothesis. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. 65--90.
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  2. Matthew L. Baum (2013). The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials? Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in criminal (...)
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  3. Caroline Brett (2002). Spiritual Experience and Psychopathology: Dichotomy or Interaction? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):373-380.
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  4. Matthew R. Broome (2005). Suffering and Eternal Recurrence of the Same: The Neuroscience, Psychopathology, and Philosophy of Time. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):187-194.
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  5. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (eds.) (2009). Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Neuroscience has long had an impact on the field of psychiatry, and over the last two decades, with the advent of cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging, that influence has been most pronounced. However, many question whether psychopathology can be understood by relying on neuroscience alone, and highlight some of the perceived limits to the way in which neuroscience informs psychiatry. Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience is a philosophical analysis of the role of neuroscience in the study of psychopathology. The book examines (...)
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  6. Eric Brown, Stoic Psychopathology.
    Apathy is the best-known feature of Stoicism; even Webster's records that a Stoic lives without passions.1 But it remains unclear what Stoic apathy amounts to, because it remains unclear what Stoics understand by passions and why they find passions problematic. In this essay, I start with four unsettled questions about the Stoic definition of passions, and to answer these questions, I explain the passions as central elements of Stoic psychopathology, that is, as defects relative to the Stoic account of the (...)
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  7. Martin Brüne (2006). Evolutionary Psychiatry is Dead – Long Liveth Evolutionary Psychopathology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):408-408.
    Keller & Miller (K&M) propose that many psychiatric disorders are best explained in terms of a genetic watershed model. This view challenges traditional evolutionary accounts of psychiatric disorders, many of which have tried to argue in support of a presumed balanced polymorphism, implying some hidden adaptive advantage of the alleles predisposing people to psychiatric disorders. Does this mean that evolutionary ideas are no longer viable to explain psychiatric disorders? The answer is no. However, K&M's critical evaluation supports the view that (...)
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  8. Daniel Buchman, Judy Illes & Peter Reiner (2011). The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience. Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
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  9. Lisa J. Burklund & Matthew D. Lieberman (2012). Advances in Functional Neuroimaging of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (4):333-337.
    In their paper "Conceptual Challenges in the Neuroimaging of Psychiatric Disorders," Kanaan and McGuire (2011) review a number of methodological and analytical obstacles associated with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study psychiatric disorders. Although we agree that there are challenges and limitations to this end, it would be a shame for those without a background in neuroimaging to walk away from this article with the impression that such work is too daunting, and thus not worth pursuing. (...)
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  10. Stefano Canali (2004). On the Concept of the Psychological. Topoi 23 (2):177-86.
    The idea that certain mental phenomena (e.g. emotions, depression, anxiety) can represent risk factors for certain somatic diseases runs through common thinking on the subject and through a large part of biomedical science. This idea still lies at the focus of the research tradition in psychosomatic medicine and in certain interdisciplinary approaches that followed it, such as psychoneuroimmunology. Nevertheless, the inclusion in the scientific literature of specifically mental phenomena in the list of risk factors pertaining to a specific pathological condition (...)
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  11. Adrian Carter, Polly Ambermoon & Wayne D. Hall (2011). Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis. Neuroethics 4 (2):91-102.
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for criminal sexual behaviours. In this article we first examine the evidence (...)
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  12. M. CerMolacce, J. Naudin & J. Parnas (2007). The “Minimal Self” in Psychopathology: Re-Examining the Self-Disorders in the Schizophrenia Spectrum☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):703-714.
  13. Louis C. Charland (2007). Affective Neuroscience and Addiction. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20 – 21.
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts. Accession Number: 24077919; Authors: Charland, Louis C. 1; Email Address: charland@uwo.ca; Affiliations: 1: University of Western (...)
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  14. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Constructing Persons: The Psychopathology of Identity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):157-159.
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  15. D. Ashley Cohen, Differences in Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits Among Three Patient Populations.
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  16. Max Coltheart (2013). On the Distinction Between Monothematic and Polythematic Delusions. Mind and Language 28 (1):103-112.
    Some delusional patients exhibit only a single delusional belief (or several delusional beliefs concerning a single theme): this is monothematic delusion. It contrasts with polythematic delusion, where the patient exhibits a variety of delusions concerning a variety of different themes. The neuropsychological bases of various monothematic delusions are rather well understood, and there is a well-worked-out general neuropsychological theory of monothematic delusion, the two-factor theory. Whether polythematic delusion might be explained in a similar way is an open question: I sketch (...)
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  17. Max Coltheart (2005). Conscious Experience and Delusional Belief. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):153-157.
  18. Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (2000). Pathologies of Belief. Blackwell.
    Blackwell, 2000 Review by George Graham, Ph.D on Oct 27th 2000 Volume: 4, Number: 43.
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  19. Robert S. Corrington (1987). Hermeneutics and Psychopathology: Jaspers and Hillman. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):70-80.
  20. H. Crichton-Miller (1928). Psychopathology: Its Development and its Place in Medicine. By Bernard Hart M.D.(Lond.), F.R.C.P.(Lond). , Physician in Psychological Medicine, University College Hospital and National Hospital, Queen Square, London. (London: Cambridge University Press. 1927. Pp. Vi + 156. Price 7s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 3 (09):118-.
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  21. Stefaan E. Cuypers (1999). The Philosophy of Psychopathology. Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):154 – 158.
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  22. Larry Davidson & Golan Shahar (2008). From Deficit to Desire: A Philosophical Reconsideration of Action Models of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):215-232.
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  23. Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2000). Introduction: Pathologies of Belief. Mind and Language 15 (1):1–46.
    who are unrecognizable because they are in disguise. ¼ The person I see in the mirror is not really me. ¼ A person I knew who died is nevertheless in the hospital ward today. ¼ This arm [the speaker’s left arm] is not mine it is yours; you have..
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  24. Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2000). Pathologies of Belief. Mind and Language 15:1-46.
    1923; Young, this volume); the Cotard delusion (Cotard, 1882; Berrios and Luque, 1995; Young, this volume); the Fregoli delusion (Courbon and Fail, 1927; de Pauw, Szulecka and Poltock, 1987; Ellis, Whitley and Luaute´, 1994); the delusion of mirrored-self misidentifi- cation (Foley and Breslau, 1982; Breen et al., this volume); a delusion of reduplicative param- nesia (Benson, Gardner and Meadows, 1976; Breen et al., this volume); a delusion sometimes found in patients suffering from unilateral neglect (Bisiach, 1988); and the delusions of (...)
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  25. Stephen DeBerry (1991). The Externalization of Consciousness and the Psychopathology of Everyday Life. Greenwood Press.
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  26. Curtis K. Deutsch, Wesley W. Ludwig & William J. McIlvane (2008). Heterogeneity and Hypothesis Testing in Neuropsychiatric Illness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):266-267.
    The confounding effects of heterogeneity in biological psychiatry and psychiatric genetics have been widely discussed in the literature. We suggest an approach in which heterogeneity may be put to use in hypothesis testing, and may find application in evaluation of the Crespi & Badcock (C&B) imprinting hypothesis. Here we consider three potential sources of etiologic subtypes for analysis.
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  27. D. B. Double (2007). Adolf Meyer's Psychobiology and the Challenge for Biomedicine. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (4):pp. 331-339.
    George Engel’s biopsychosocial model was associated with the critique of biomedical dogmatism and acknowledged the historical precedence of the work of Adolf Meyer. However, the importance of Meyer’s psychobiology is not always recognized. One of the reasons may be because of his tendency to compromise with biomedical attitudes. This paper restates the Meyerian perspective, explicitly acknowledging the split between biomedical and biopsychological approaches in the origin of modern psychiatry. Our present-day understanding of this conflict is confounded by reactions to ‘anti-psychiatry.’ (...)
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  28. Zoe Drayson (2009). Embodied Cognitive Science and its Implications for Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (4):329-340.
    The past twenty years have seen an increase in the importance of the body in psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind. This 'embodied' trend challenges the orthodox view in cognitive science in several ways: it downplays the traditional 'mind-as-computer' approach and emphasizes the role of interactions between the brain, body, and environment. In this article, I review recent work in the area of embodied cognitive science and explore the approaches each takes to the ideas of consciousness, computation and representation. Finally, (...)
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  29. Hubert L. Dreyfus (1989). Alternative Philosophical Conceptualizations of Psychopathology. In Phenomenology and Beyond: The Self and its Language. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
    Home Courses Selected Papers Selected Books C.V. Dreydegger.org Phil. Faculty Dept. Philosophy UC Berkeley.
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  30. Hubert L. Dreyfus (1989). Phenomenology and Beyond: The Self and its Language. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
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  31. Edward Erwin (1999). Curing Psychopathology: Can Philosophy Help? Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):189-205.
    It is argued that philosophers can contribute indirectly to the cure of psychopathology by helping to resolve problems that impede the development of effective treatments. Two such problems are discussed. The first arises because different schools of therapy use conflicting criteria in evaluating therapeutic outcomes. A theory of Defective Desires is developed to deal with this problem. The second issue, which divides the field of psychotherapy, concerns the need for experiments, especially in validating claims of therapeutic efficacy. An epistemological foundation (...)
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  32. Vincent Estellon & Harold Mouras (2012). Sexual Addiction: Insights From Psychoanalysis and Functional Neuroimaging. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Sexual motivation is a fundamental behavior in human. For a long time, this behavior has been somehow ignored from psychological and neuroscientific research. In this article - reflecting the collaboration of a clinical psychologist and a neuroscientist - we show that in the current period, sexual affiliation is one of the most promising affiliation context to articulate a debate, a dialog and convergence points between psychoanalysis and neuroscience. Recent data on healthy sexual behavior and its compulsive variant are discussed under (...)
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  33. Tom Eyers (2012). Lacan and the Concept of the 'Real'. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Approaching the Real -- The imaginary and the Real -- The Real and the symbolic -- Space and the Real -- The Real and psychopathology -- Lacanian materialism? -- Philosophical psychoanalysis?
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  34. Luc Faucher & Isabelle Blanchette (2011). Fearing New Dangers: Phobias and the Cognitive Complexity of Human Emotions. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press.
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  35. William F. Fischer (1986). On the Phenomenological Approach To Psychopathology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 17 (1):65-76.
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  36. William F. Fischer (1976). Erwin Straus and the Phenomenological Approach To Psychopathology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 7 (1):95-115.
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  37. Celia B. Fisher & Scyatta A. Wallace (2000). Through the Community Looking Glass: Reevaluating the Ethical and Policy Implications of Research on Adolescent Risk and Psychopathology. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):99 – 118.
    Drawing on a conception of scientists and community members as partners in the construction of ethically responsible research practices, this article urges investigators to seek the perspectives of teenagers and parents in evaluating the personal and political costs and benefits of research on adolescent risk behaviors. Content analysis of focus group discussions involving over 100 parents and teenagers from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds revealed community opinions regarding the scientific merit, social value, racial bias, and participant and group harms and (...)
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  38. Elizabeth H. Flanagan (2000). Essentialism and a Folk-Taxonomic Approach to the Classification of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (3):183-189.
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  39. Antony G. N. Flew (1981). Disease and Mental Disease. In Concepts Of Health And Disease. Reading: Addison-Wesley.
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  40. K. A. Forrest (2001). Toward an Etiology of Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Neurodevelopmental Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):259-293.
    This article elaborates on Putnam's ''discrete behavioral states'' model of dissociative identity disorder (Putnam, 1997) by proposing the involvement of the orbitalfrontal cortex in the development of DID and suggesting a potential neurodevelopmental mechanism responsible for the development of multiple representations of self. The proposed ''orbitalfrontal'' model integrates and elaborates on theory and research from four domains: the neurobiology of the orbitalfrontal cortex and its protective inhibitory role in the temporal organization of behavior, the development of emotion regulation, the development (...)
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  41. Paul Franceschi (2010). A Logical Defence of Maher's Model of Polythematic Delusions. Journal of Philosophical Research 35 (2).
  42. Christopher D. Frith & Shaun Gallagher (2002). Models of the Pathological Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):57-80.
  43. Thomas Fuchs (2013). Temporality and Psychopathology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):75-104.
    The paper first introduces the concept of implicit and explicit temporality, referring to time as pre-reflectively lived vs. consciously experienced. Implicit time is based on the constitutive synthesis of inner time consciousness on the one hand, and on the conative–affective dynamics of life on the other hand. Explicit time results from an interruption or negation of implicit time and unfolds itself in the dimensions of present, past and future. It is further shown that temporality, embodiment and intersubjectivity are closely connected: (...)
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  44. Thomas Fuchs (2010). The Psychopathology of Hyperreflexivity. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (3):239-255.
    The structure of human embodiment is fundamentally characterized by a polarity or ambiguity between Leib and Körper, the subjective body and the objectified body, or between being-body and having-a-body. This ambiguity, emphasized, above all, by Helmuth Plessner and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, is also of crucial significance for psychopathology. Insofar as mental illnesses disturb or interrupt the unhindered conduct of one’s life, they also exacerbate the tension within embodiment that holds between being-body and having-a-body. In mental illnesses, there is a failure of (...)
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  45. Thomas Fuchs (2005). Overcoming Dualism. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):115-117.
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  46. K. W. M. Fulford & Mike Jackson (1997). Spiritual Experience and Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):41-65.
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  47. K. William M. Fulford (1995). Mind and Madness: New Directions in the Philosophy of Psychiatry. In A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.), Philosophy, Psychology, and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. 5-24.
    The links between Descartes logito and the schizophrenic symptom of "inserted thoughts" are used to illustrate the potential for two- way exchange between philosophy and psychiatry. Patients suffering thought insertion have thoughts in their heads, which "they" are thinking, but which they experience as the thoughts "of someone else": "I think therefore someone else is". Philosophical work on personal identity helps to clarify the remarkable phenomenological features of thought insertion: conversely, thought insertion challenges philosophical theories of personal identity. More generally, (...)
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  48. K. William M. Fulford (1994). Value, Illness, and Failure of Action: Framework for a Philosophical Psychopathology of Delusions. In George Graham & Lester D. Stephens (eds.), Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press.
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  49. Shaun Gallagher (2004). Neurocognitive Models of Schizophrenia: A Neurophenomenological Critique. Psychopathology 37 (1):8–19.
    In the past dozen years a number of theoretical models of schizophrenic symptoms have been proposed, often inspired by advances in the cognitive sciences, and especially cognitive neuroscience. Perhaps the most widely cited and influential of these is the neurocognitive model proposed by Christopher Frith (1992). Frith's influence reaches into psychiatry, neuroscience, and even philosophy. The philosopher John Campbell (1999a), for example, has called Frith's model the most parsimonious explanation of how self-ascriptions of thoughts are subject to errors of identification. (...)
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  50. José M. García-Montes, Marino Pérez Álvarez, Louis A. Sass & Adolfo J. Cangas (2009). The Role of Superstition in Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):227-237.
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