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Psychopathology

Edited by Serife Tekin (University of Pittsburgh, Dalhousie University, Daemen College)
About this topic
Summary The term "psychopathology" is used in a variety of contexts in philosophy of psychiatry. Broadly put, it refers to the philosophical and scientific study of mental disorders. It is also used, however, to denote behaviors or symptoms that are indicative of mental illness, such as hallucinations.
Key works Maibom 2008 Graham 1999 Poland et al 1994
Introductions Poland et al 1994
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  1. D. M. Adams (2003). CQ Reviews (Greg Loeben, Column Editor) Divided Minds and Successive Selves: Ethical Issues in Disorders of Identity and Personality, by Jennifer Radden. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):131-133.
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  2. John Adlam, Irwin Gill, Shane N. Glackin, Brendan D. Kelly, Christopher Scanlon & Seamus Mac Suibhne (2013). Perspectives on Erving Goffman's “Asylums” Fifty Years On. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):605-613.
    Erving Goffman’s “Asylums” is a key text in the development of contemporary, community-orientated mental health practice. It has survived as a trenchant critique of the asylum as total institution, and its publication in 1961 in book form marked a further stage in the discrediting of the asylum model of mental health care. In this paper, some responses from a range of disciplines to this text, 50 years on, are presented. A consultant psychiatrist with a special interest in cultural psychiatry and (...)
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  3. Joseph Agassi (2000). The Disorder of Things. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (2):136-138.
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  4. Piers Allott (2009). Mental Disorder, Diagnosis, Treatment and Ethics. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 1 (1):8.
    This short contribution questions the ethics of basing the way we think and act in relation to mental disorder on beliefs and assumptions that are in the view of the author at best, unhelpful and at worst, simply incorrect.
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  5. John M. Anderson (1938). Change and Personality. Journal of Philosophy 35 (19):505-517.
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  6. Preti Antonio & Miotto Paola (2006). Mental Disorders, Evolution, and Inclusive Fitness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4).
  7. Hanna Aronsson (2011). Sexual Imprinting and Fetishism: An Evolutionary Hypothesis. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. 65--90.
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  8. J. B. Ashford & J. Littrell (1998). Psychopathology. In Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.), The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland Pub.. 127--168.
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  9. Abnormal Time Processing In Autism (2001). Time-Parsing and Autism. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 111.
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  10. Anita Avramides (2013). Other Minds, Autism, and Depth in Human Interaction. In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. 275.
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  11. Francis M. Barnes (1924). Mental Disorders. Journal of Philosophy 21 (6):165-166.
  12. Simon Baron-Cohen (2005). Autism Autos": Literally. In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press.
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  13. Annie Bartlett (2009). Medical Models of Mental Disorder. In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. Oup Oxford.
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  14. Matthew L. Baum (2013). The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials? Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in criminal (...)
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  15. Monroe C. Beardsley (1968). Order and Disorder in Art. In Paul Grimley Kuntz (ed.), The Concept of Order. Seattle, Published for Grinnell College by the University of Washington Press. 198--99.
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  16. Benjamin L. Berger (2012). Mental Disorder and the Instability of Blame in Criminal Law. In François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.), Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.
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  17. Rudolph Berlinger (1977). Rehabilitation der Krankheit in philosophischer Sicht. Perspektiven der Philosophie 3:3-17.
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  18. D. Bolton & J. Hill (1998). Mind, Meaning and Mental Disorder. Philosophy 73 (285):504-508.
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  19. Jill Boucher (1996). 14 What Could Possibly Explain Autism? In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 223.
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  20. Guy A. Boysen (2008). A Reanalysis of Relational Disorders Using Wakefield's Theory of Harmful Dysfunction. Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (4):331-343.
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  21. Guy A. Boysen (2007). An Evaluation of the DSM Concept of Mental Disorder. Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (2):157-173.
    The stated purpose of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is to classify mental disorders. However, no tenable operational definition of mental disorder is offered in the manual. This leaves the possibility open that the behaviors labeled as disordered in the DSM are not members of a valid category. Attempts to define mental illness fall into the category of essentialist or relativist based, respectively, on the acceptance or denial of the existence of a defining biological attribute that all (...)
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  22. Minimal Brain (1979). The Hyperkinetic Disorder 121. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology. , Volume 2. 2--121.
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  23. Hillel D. Braude (2013). Affecting the Body and Transforming Desire: The Treatment of Suffering as the End of Medicine. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):265-278.
    I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment. I will keep them from harm and injustice. The Hippocratic Oath formulates the ethical principle of medical beneficence and its negative formulation non-maleficence. It relates medical ethics to the traditional end of medicine, that is, to heal, or to make whole. First and foremost, the duty of the physician is to heal, and if this is not possible at least not to harm. This (...)
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  24. Caroline Brett (2002). Spiritual Experience and Psychopathology: Dichotomy or Interaction? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):373-380.
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  25. Matthew R. Broome (2005). Suffering and Eternal Recurrence of the Same: The Neuroscience, Psychopathology, and Philosophy of Time. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):187-194.
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  26. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (eds.) (2009). Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Neuroscience has long had an impact on the field of psychiatry, and over the last two decades, with the advent of cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging, that influence has been most pronounced. However, many question whether psychopathology can be understood by relying on neuroscience alone, and highlight some of the perceived limits to the way in which neuroscience informs psychiatry. Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience is a philosophical analysis of the role of neuroscience in the study of psychopathology. The book examines (...)
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  27. Eric Brown, Stoic Psychopathology.
    Apathy is the best-known feature of Stoicism; even Webster's records that a Stoic lives without passions.1 But it remains unclear what Stoic apathy amounts to, because it remains unclear what Stoics understand by passions and why they find passions problematic. In this essay, I start with four unsettled questions about the Stoic definition of passions, and to answer these questions, I explain the passions as central elements of Stoic psychopathology, that is, as defects relative to the Stoic account of the (...)
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  28. Tamara Kayali Browne (forthcoming). Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Really a Disorder? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-18.
    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was recently moved to a full category in the DSM-5 (the latest edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). It also appears set for inclusion as a separate disorder in the ICD-11 (the upcoming edition of the World Health Organization’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems). This paper argues that PMDD should not be listed in the DSM or the ICD at all, adding to the call to (...)
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  29. Martin Brüne (2006). Evolutionary Psychiatry is Dead – Long Liveth Evolutionary Psychopathology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):408-408.
    Keller & Miller (K&M) propose that many psychiatric disorders are best explained in terms of a genetic watershed model. This view challenges traditional evolutionary accounts of psychiatric disorders, many of which have tried to argue in support of a presumed balanced polymorphism, implying some hidden adaptive advantage of the alleles predisposing people to psychiatric disorders. Does this mean that evolutionary ideas are no longer viable to explain psychiatric disorders? The answer is no. However, K&M's critical evaluation supports the view that (...)
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  30. Daniel Buchman, Judy Illes & Peter Reiner (2011). The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience. Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
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  31. Lisa J. Burklund & Matthew D. Lieberman (2012). Advances in Functional Neuroimaging of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (4):333-337.
    In their paper "Conceptual Challenges in the Neuroimaging of Psychiatric Disorders," Kanaan and McGuire (2011) review a number of methodological and analytical obstacles associated with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study psychiatric disorders. Although we agree that there are challenges and limitations to this end, it would be a shame for those without a background in neuroimaging to walk away from this article with the impression that such work is too daunting, and thus not worth pursuing. (...)
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  32. Fredric N. Busch & Barbara L. Milrod (2004). Nature and Treatment of Panic Disorder. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. 345.
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  33. Stefano Canali (2004). On the Concept of the Psychological. Topoi 23 (2):177-86.
    The idea that certain mental phenomena (e.g. emotions, depression, anxiety) can represent risk factors for certain somatic diseases runs through common thinking on the subject and through a large part of biomedical science. This idea still lies at the focus of the research tradition in psychosomatic medicine and in certain interdisciplinary approaches that followed it, such as psychoneuroimmunology. Nevertheless, the inclusion in the scientific literature of specifically mental phenomena in the list of risk factors pertaining to a specific pathological condition (...)
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  34. Adrian Carter, Polly Ambermoon & Wayne D. Hall (2011). Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis. Neuroethics 4 (2):91-102.
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for criminal sexual behaviours. In this article we first examine the evidence (...)
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  35. Manuel Casonova & Juan Trippe (2010). Radical Cytoarchitecture and Patterns of Cortical Connectivity in Autism. In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.
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  36. M. CerMolacce, J. Naudin & J. Parnas (2007). The “Minimal Self” in Psychopathology: Re-Examining the Self-Disorders in the Schizophrenia Spectrum☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):703-714.
    The notion of minimal, basic, pre-reflective or core self is currently debated in the philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences and developmental psychology. However, it is not clear which experiential features such a self is believed to possess. Studying the schizophrenic experience may help exploring the following aspects of the minimal self: the notion of perspective and first person perspective, the ‘mineness’ of the phenomenal field, the questions of transparency, embodiment of point of view, and the issues of agency and ownership, (...)
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  37. Louis Charland, Moral Nature of the Dsm-IV Cluster B Personality Disorders.
    Moral considerations do not appear to play a large role in discussions of the DSM-IV personality disorders and debates about their empirical validity. Yet philosophical analysis reveals that the Cluster B personality disorders, in particular, may in fact be moral rather than clinical conditions. This finding has serious consequences for how they should be treated and by whom.
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  38. Louis Charland (2007). Character: Moral Treatment and the Personality Disorders. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oup Usa.
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  39. Louis C. Charland (2007). Affective Neuroscience and Addiction. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20 – 21.
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts. Accession Number: 24077919; Authors: Charland, Louis C. 1; Email Address: charland@uwo.ca; Affiliations: 1: University of Western (...)
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  40. Louis C. Charland (2004). Personality Disorders. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press. 64.
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  41. S. R. Charles (2006). The Emergent Metaphysics in Plato's Theory of Disorder. Lexington Books.
    The Emergent Metaphysics in Plato's Theory of Disorder presents for the first time Plato's theory of disorder as it pertains to his understanding of powerful causal forces at work within and outwith the cosmos and the soul of man. Divided into two Parts and presenting passages in both Greek and English, Plato's cosmology, the Timaeus, and his chief theological work, Laws X, are discussed in detail.
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  42. Keith D. Cicerone (2005). Rehabilitation of Executive Function Impairments. In Walter M. High Jr, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press. 71--87.
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  43. M. Clark (1997). Elliott, C.-The Rules of Insanity. Philosophical Books 38:214-214.
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  44. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Constructing Persons: The Psychopathology of Identity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):157-159.
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  45. Michael Clinton (2009). On the Colour of Herring: Response to Commentary, Response to Dr Charland's Commentary On:" Should Mental Health Professionals Refer Clients with Substance Use Disorders to 12-Step Programs?". Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (1):7.
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  46. D. Ashley Cohen, Differences in Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits Among Three Patient Populations.
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  47. Max Coltheart (2013). On the Distinction Between Monothematic and Polythematic Delusions. Mind and Language 28 (1):103-112.
    Some delusional patients exhibit only a single delusional belief (or several delusional beliefs concerning a single theme): this is monothematic delusion. It contrasts with polythematic delusion, where the patient exhibits a variety of delusions concerning a variety of different themes. The neuropsychological bases of various monothematic delusions are rather well understood, and there is a well-worked-out general neuropsychological theory of monothematic delusion, the two-factor theory. Whether polythematic delusion might be explained in a similar way is an open question: I sketch (...)
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  48. Max Coltheart (2005). Conscious Experience and Delusional Belief. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):153-157.
  49. Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (2000). Pathologies of Belief. Blackwell.
  50. Sedikides Constantine & D. Green Jeffrey (2006). The Mnemic Neglect Model: Experimental Demonstrations of Inhibitory Repression in Normal Adults. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5).
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