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Siblings:See also:History/traditions: Psychophysical Parallelism
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  1. Laird Addis (1984). Parallelism, Interactionism, and Causation. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):329-344.
    One may gather from the arguments of two of the last papers published before his death that J. L. Mackie held the following three theses concerning the mind/body problem : (1) There is a distinct realm of mental properties, so a dualism of properties at least is true and materialism false.
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  2. Albert G. A. Balz (1935). Some Historical Steps Towards Parallelism. Philosophical Review 44 (6):544-566.
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  3. Henri Bergson (2005). Continental Philosophy of Science (Blackwell Readings in Continental Philosophy). Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing.
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  4. Henri Bergson (2005). Psychophysical Parallelism and Positive Metaphysics. In Continental Philosophy of Science (Blackwell Readings in Continental Philosophy). Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing
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  5. Pietro Gori (2015). Psychology Without a Soul, Philosophy Without an I: Nietzsche and 19th Century Psychophysics. In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter 166-195.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s criticism towards the substance-concept „I“ plays an important role in his late thought, and can be properly understood by making reference to the 19th century debate on the scientific psychology. Friedrich Lange and Ernst Mach gave an important contribution to that debate. Both of them developed the ideas of Gustav Fechner, and thought about a „psychology without soul“, i.e. an investigation that gives up with the old metaphysics of substance in dealing with the mind-body problem. In this paper (...)
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  6. Robert A. M. Gregson (2000). Chaotic Dynamics and Psychophysical Parallelism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):541-542.
    An impressive review of brain neurophysiology provides the basis for modelling the dynamics of transmission in neural circuits, using appropriate nonlinear mathematics. The coverage is unbalanced, however: the parallel dynamics at the level of behaviour and sensory-cognitive processes are sparsely addressed, so the final chapter fails to indicate the complexity and subtlety of relevant modern work.
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  7. Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.) (1986). Spinoza And The Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
    My aspiration, however, is not to situate Spinoza among the natural philosophical giants who opened the way to modern science. I cannot conscript him into ...
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  8. Michael Heidelberger (2003). Logical Empiricism: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.
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  9. Michael Heidelberger (2003). The Mind-Body Problem in the Origin of Logical Empiricism: Herbert Feigl and Psychophysical Parallelism. In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Logical Empiricism: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press 233--262.
    It is widely held that the current debate on the mind-body problem in analytic philosophy began during the 1950s at two distinct sources: one in America, de- riving from Herbert Feigl's writings, and the other in Australia, related to writings by U. T. Place and J. J. C. Smart (Feigl [1958] 1967). Jaegwon Kim recently wrote that "it was the papers by Smart and Feigl that introduced the mind-body problem as a mainstream metaphysical Problematik of analytical philosophy, and launched the (...)
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  10. Michael Heidelberger (2003). The Mind-Body Problem in the Origin of Logical Empiricism: Herbert Feigl and Psychophysical Parallelism. In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Cogprints. Pittsburgh University Pres 233--262.
    In the 19th century, "Psychophysical Parallelism" was the most popular solution of the mind-body problem among physiologists, psychologists and philosophers. (This is not to be mixed up with Leibnizian and other cases of "Cartesian" parallelism.) The fate of this non-Cartesian view, as founded by Gustav Theodor Fechner, is reviewed. It is shown that Feigl's "identity theory" eventually goes back to Alois Riehl who promoted a hybrid version of psychophysical parallelism and Kantian mind-body theory which was taken up by Feigl's teacher (...)
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  11. Michael Heidelberger (2003). Cogprints.
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  12. Hans Jonas (1986). Parallelism and Complementarity: The Psycho-Physical Problem in Spinoza and in the Succession of Niels Bohr. In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer 237--247.
  13. Friedrich Kambartel (1999). Actions, Norms, Values. Hawthorne: De Gruyter.
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  14. Friedrich Kambartel (1999). Remarks on Psycho-Physical Parallelism. In Actions, Norms, Values. Hawthorne: De Gruyter
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  15. Kristjan Laasik (2015). Norman Sieroka: Leibniz, Husserl, and the Brain. [REVIEW] Phenomenological Reviews.
    Norman Sieroka’s book is about “the systematic, structural relations between phenomenological and (neuro)physiological aspects of perception, consciousness, and time, with a specific focus on hearing” (p. 4), based on Leibniz’s and Husserl’s views. While Sieroka displays a great depth of knowledge in his discussions of these two philosophers, his main aims are not exegetic, but consist, rather, in casting new light on the said philosophical and interdisciplinary issues. However, the scope of his interpretative project is ambitious. There is, on the (...)
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  16. G. T. Ladd (1904). Brief Critique of Psychological Parallelism. Philosophical Review 13:87.
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  17. Alfred H. Lloyd (1917). Psychophysical Parallelism: A Psychological Episode in History. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 14 (21):561-570.
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  18. Alfred H. Lloyd (1911). Dualism, Parallelism and Infinitism. Mind 20 (78):212-234.
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  19. Henryk Mehlberg (1995). On Psychophysical Parallelism. Axiomathes 6 (1):39-57.
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  20. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinoza's Metaphysics of Thought: Parallelisms and the Multifaceted Structure of Ideas. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):636-683.
    In this paper, I suggest an outline of a new interpretation of core issues in Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind. I argue for three major theses. (1) In the first part of the paper I show that the celebrated Spinozistic doctrine commonly termed “the doctrine of parallelism” is in fact a confusion of two separate and independent doctrines of parallelism. Hence, I argue that our current understanding of Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind is fundamentally flawed. (2) The clarification (...)
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  21. Thomas Natsoulas (1984). Gustav Bergmann's Psychophysiological Parallelism. Behaviorism 12 (1):41-70.
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  22. Lois K. Smedick (1979). Parallelism and Pointing in Rolle's Rhythmical Style. Mediaeval Studies 41 (1):404-467.
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  23. Kendon Smith (1985). A Note on Natsoulas on Psychophysiological Parallelism. Behaviorism 13 (1):83-84.
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  24. Leon M. Solomons (1899). The Alleged Proof of Parallelism From the Conservation of Energy. Philosophical Review 8 (2):146-165.
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  25. George Trumbull Ladd (1903). Brief Critique of "Psycho-Physical Parallelism". Mind 12 (47):374-380.
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  26. R. B. A. Wise (1982). The Parallelism of Attributes. Philosophical Papers 11 (October):23-37.
  27. Lei Zhong (2015). Semantic Normativity and Semantic Causality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Semantic normativism, which is the view that semantic properties/concepts are some kind of normative properties/concepts, has become increasingly influential in contemporary meta-semantics. In this paper, I aim to argue that semantic normativism has difficulty accommodating the causal efficacy of semantic properties. In specific, I raise an exclusion problem for semantic normativism, inspired by the exclusion problem in the philosophy of mind. Moreover, I attempt to show that the exclusion problem for semantic normativism is peculiarly troublesome: while we can solve mental-physical (...)
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  28. Lei Zhong (2014). Sophisticated Exclusion and Sophisticated Causation. Journal of Philosophy 111 (7):341-360.
    The Exclusion Argument, which aims to deny the causal efficacy of irreducible mental properties, is probably the most serious challenge to non-reductive physicalism. Many proposed solutions to the exclusion problem can only reject simplified exclusion arguments, but fail to block a sophisticated version I introduce. In this paper, I attempt to show that we can refute the sophisticated exclusion argument by appeal to a sophisticated understanding of causation, what I call the 'Dual-condition Conception of Causation'. Specifically, I argue that the (...)
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