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  1. Liliana Albertazzi (2002). Phenomenologists and Analytics: A Question of Psychophysics? Southern Journal of Philosophy (Suppl.) 40 (S1):27-48.
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  2. Daniel Algom & Lawrence E. Marks (1989). Memory Psychophysics for Taste. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (3):257-259.
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  3. Jaakko Blomberg (1971). Psychophysics, Sensation and Information. Ajatus 33:106-137.
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  4. Edwin G. Boring (1935). The Relation of the Attributes of Sensation to the Dimensions of the Stimulus. Philosophy of Science 2 (2):236-245.
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  5. Francis H. Bradley (1895). What Do We Mean by the Intensity of Psychical States. Mind 4 (13):1-27.
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  6. Bruno G. Breitmeyer (1985). Problems with the Psychophysics of Intention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):539-540.
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  7. Robert Briscoe, Depiction, Pictorial Experience, and Vision Science.
    Pictures are 2D surfaces designed to elicit 3D-scene-representing experiences from their viewers. In this essay, I argue that philosophers have tended to underestimate the relevance of research in vision science to understanding the nature of pictorial experience or ‘seeing-in’, to use Richard Wollheim’s familiar expression. Both the deeply entrenched methodology of virtual psychophysics as well as empirical studies of pictorial space perception provide compelling support for the view that seeing-in and seeing face-to-face are experiences of the same psychological, explanatory kind. (...)
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  8. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Cognitive Penetration and the Reach of Phenomenal Content. In Athanassios Raftopoulos & John Zeimbekis (eds.), Cognitive Penetrability. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter critically assesses recent arguments that acquiring the ability to categorize an object as belonging to a certain high-level kind can cause the relevant kind property to be represented in visual phenomenal content. The first two arguments, developed respectively by Susanna Siegel (2010) and Tim Bayne (2009), employ an essentially phenomenological methodology. The third argument, developed by William Fish (2013), by contrast, is supported by an array of psychophysical and neuroscientific findings. I argue that while none of these arguments (...)
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  9. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Multisensory Processing and Perceptual Consciousness: Part I. Philosophy Compass.
    Multisensory processing encompasses all of the various ways in which the presence of information in one sensory modality can adaptively influence the processing of information in a different modality. In Part I of this survey article, I begin by presenting a cartography of some of the more extensively investigated forms of multisensory processing, with a special focus on two distinct types of multisensory integration. I briefly discuss the conditions under which these different forms of multisensory processing occur as well as (...)
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  10. Robert Briscoe (2008). Vision, Action, and Make‐Perceive. Mind and Language 23 (4):457-497.
    In this paper, I critically assess the enactive account of visual perception recently defended by Alva Noë (2004). I argue inter alia that the enactive account falsely identifies an object’s apparent shape with its 2D perspectival shape; that it mistakenly assimilates visual shape perception and volumetric object recognition; and that it seriously misrepresents the constitutive role of bodily action in visual awareness. I argue further that noticing an object’s perspectival shape involves a hybrid experience combining both perceptual and imaginative elements (...)
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  11. Ben Bronner (2015). Representationalism and the Determinacy of Visual Content. Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):227-239.
    DETERMINACY is the claim that covert shifts in visual attention sometimes affect the determinacy of visual content (capital letters will distinguish the claim from the familiar word, 'determinacy'). Representationalism is the claim that visual phenomenology supervenes on visual representational content. Both claims are popular among contemporary philosophers of mind, and DETERMINACY has been employed in defense of representationalism. I claim that existing arguments in favor of DETERMINACY are inconclusive. As a result, DETERMINACY-based arguments in support of representationalism are not strong (...)
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  12. Jeremy Butterfield (1998). Quantum Curiosities of Psychophysics. In J. Cornwell (ed.), Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press.
    I survey some of the connections between the metaphysics of the relation between mind and matter, and quantum theory’s measurement problem. After discussing the metaphysics, especially the correct formulation of physicalism, I argue that two state-reduction approaches to quantum theory’s measurement problem hold some surprises for philosophers’ discussions of physicalism. Though both approaches are compatible with physicalism, they involve a very different conception of the physical, and of how the physical underpins the mental, from what most philosophers expect. And one (...)
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  13. J. Mck Cattell (1892). The Psychophysics of Movement. Mind 1:446.
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  14. James McKeen Cattell & George Stuart Fullerton (1892). The Psychophysics of Movement. Mind 1 (3):447-452.
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  15. E. I. Chew & J. T. E. Richardson (1980). The Relationship Between Perceptual and Memorial Psychophysics. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (1):25-26.
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  16. J. Cornwell (ed.) (1998). Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press.
  17. N. Cowan (2004). On the Psychophysics of Memory. In Christian Kaernbach, Erich Schroger & Hermann Müller (eds.), Psychophysics Beyond Sensation: Laws and Invariants of Human Cognition. Psychology Press. 313--317.
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  18. David Cross (1976). A Dialectic for Psychophysics. World Futures 14 (4):403-409.
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  19. V. di Lollo, James T. Enns & R. Rensink (2000). Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes. Journal Of Experimental Psychology-General 129 (4):481-507.
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  20. Vincent Di Lollo, James T. Enns & Ronald A. Rensink (2000). Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 129 (4):481.
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  21. H. Eisler (1975). Subjective Duration and Psychophysics. Psychological Review 82:429-50.
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  22. Hannes Eisler & Chris Ottander (1963). On the Problem of Hysteresis in Psychophysics. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (6):530.
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  23. J. T. Enns, R. A. Rensink & V. Di Lollo (2000). Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 129 (4):481-507.
    Advances in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology have called attention to reentrant signalling as the predominant form of communication between brain areas. We propose that explicit use be made of reentrant processing in theories of perception. To show that this can be done effectively in one domain, we report on a series of psychophysical experiments involving a new form of masking, which defies explanation by current feed-forward theories. This masking occurs when a brief display of target plus mask is continued with the (...)
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  24. William K. Estes (1992). Mental Psychophysics of Categorization and Decision. In H. G. Geissler, S. W. Link & J. T. Townsend (eds.), Cognition, Information Processing, and Psychophysics: Basic Issues. Lawrence Erlbaum. 123--139.
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  25. J. N. Findlay (1950). Linguistic Approach to Psychophysics. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 50:43-64.
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  26. Gregory Francis & Frouke Hermens (2002). Comment on Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes (di Lollo, Enns & Rensink, 2000). Journal of Experimental Psychology 131 (4):590-593.
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  27. Todd Ganson & Ben Bronner (2013). Visual Prominence and Representationalism. Philosophical Studies 164 (2):405-418.
    A common objection to representationalism is that a representationalist view of phenomenal character cannot accommodate the effects that shifts in covert attention have on visual phenomenology: covert attention can make items more visually prominent than they would otherwise be without altering the content of visual experience. Recent empirical work on attention casts doubt on previous attempts to advance this type of objection to representationalism and it also points the way to an alternative development of the objection.
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  28. H. G. Geissler, S. W. Link & J. T. Townsend (eds.) (1992). Cognition, Information Processing, and Psychophysics: Basic Issues. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    The plan for this volume emerged during the international Leipzig conference commemorating the centenary of the death of Gustav Fechner.
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  29. John W. Gyr (1994). Psychophysics: The Self-Referent Holonomic Observer-Observed. In Karl H. Pribram (ed.), Origins: Brain and Self-Organization. Lawrence Erlbaum. 102.
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  30. A. H. Holway & L. M. Hurvich (1938). On the Psychophysics of Taste. I. Pressure and Area as Variants. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (2):191.
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  31. Steven Horst (2005). Phenomenology and Psychophysics. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):1-21.
    Recent philosophy of mind has tended to treat.
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  32. F. Nowell Jones & Maxine J. Marcus (1961). The Subject Effect in Judgments of Subjective Magnitude. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (1):40.
  33. Yasmina Jraissati (2013). Proving Universalism Wrong Does Not Prove Relativism Right: Considerations on the Ongoing Color Categorization Debate. Philosophical Psychology (3):1-24.
    For over a century, the question of the relation of language to thought has been extensively discussed in the case of color categorization, where two main views prevail. The relativist view claims that color categories are relative while the universalistic view argues that color categories are universal. Relativists also argue that color categories are linguistically determined, and universalists that they are perceptually determined. Recently, the argument for the perceptual determination of color categorization has been undermined, and the relativist view has (...)
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  34. Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color: Assessing the Role of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):439-462.
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make three related (...)
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  35. Christian Kaernbach, Erich Schroger & Hermann Müller (eds.) (2004). Psychophysics Beyond Sensation: Laws and Invariants of Human Cognition. Psychology Press.
    This volume presents a series of studies that expand laws, invariants, and principles of psychophysics beyond its classical domain of sensation.
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  36. Tim Christian Kietzmann, Philosophical Accounts of Causal Explanation and the Scientific Practice of Psychophysics.
    Philosophical accounts of causality and causal explanation can provide important guidelines for the experimental sciences and valid experimental setups. In addition to the obvious requirement of logic validity, however, the approaches must account for the generally accepted experimental practice to be truly useful. To investigate this important interconnection, the current paper evaluates different philosophical accounts of causation and causal explanation in the light of typical psychophysical experiments. In particular, eye-tracking setups will be used to evaluate Granger Causality, Probabilistic Accounts and (...)
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  37. S. A. Klein (1998). Double-Judgment Psychophysics for Research on Cosnciousness: Application to Blindsight. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
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  38. A. R. Louch (1972). The Measurement of Sensation: A Critique of Perceptual Psychophysics (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (4):495-495.
  39. Farid Masrour, Space Perception, Visual Dissonance and the Fate of Standard Representationalism.
    This paper argues that a common form of representationalism has trouble accommodating empirical findings about visual space perception. Vision science tells us that the visual system systematically gives rise to different experiences of the same spatial property. This, combined with a naturalistic account of content, suggests that the same spatial property can have different veridical looks. I use this to argue that a common form of representationalism about spatial experience must be rejected. I conclude by considering alternatives to this view.
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  40. Joel Michell (2006). Psychophysics, Intensive Magnitudes, and the Psychometricians' Fallacy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (3):414-432.
    As an aspiring science in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, psychology pursued quantification. A problem was that degrees of psychological attributes were experienced only as greater than, less than, or equal to one another. They were categorised as intensive magnitudes. The meaning of this concept was shifting, from that of an attribute possessing underlying quantitative structure to that of a merely ordinal attribute . This fluidity allowed psychologists to claim that their attributes were intensive magnitudes and measurable . This (...)
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  41. S. Mori (ed.) (2007). Proceedings of the Int'l Society for Psychophysics. Int'l Soc. For Psychophysics.
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  42. Naoyuki Osaka (1987). Memory Psychophysics for Pyridine Smell Scale. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (1):56-57.
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  43. Scott Parker (1990). A Note on the Growth of the Use of Statistical Tests in Perception & Psychophysics. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):565-566.
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  44. William M. Petrusic & Joseph V. Baranski (2002). Mental Imagery in Memory Psychophysics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):206-207.
    Imagery has played an important, albeit controversial, role in the study of memory psychophysics. In this commentary we critically examine the available data bearing on whether pictorial based depictions of remembered perceptual events are activated and scanned in each of a number of different psychophysical tasks.
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  45. Steven M. Rosen (1976). Toward Relativization of Psychophysical "Relativity". Perceptual and Motor Skills 42:843-850.
    A paradoxical feature of Weber's law is considered. The law presumably states a principle of psychophysical relativity, yet a pre-relativistic physical measurement model has been traditionally employed. Classical physics, Einsteinian relativity, and a newer interpretation of the relativity concept are discussed. Their relation to psychophysics is examined. The domain wherein Weber's law breaks down is noted as suggestively similar to that in which physicists report relativistic effects. A tentative hypothesis is offered to stimulate further thought about a more meaningful integration (...)
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  46. Viktor Sarris (2010). Relational Psychophysics: Messages From Ebbinghaus' and Wertheimer's Work. Philosophical Psychology 23 (2):207 – 216.
    In past and modern psychophysics there are several unresolved methodological and philosophical problems of human and animal perception, including the outstanding question of the relational basis of whole psychophysics. Here the main issue is discussed: if, and to what extent, there are viable bridges between the traditional “gestalt” oriented approaches and the modern perceptual-cognitive perspectives in psychophysics. Thereby the key concept of psychological “frame of reference” is presented by pointing to Hermann Ebbinghaus' geometric-optical illusions, on the one hand, and Max (...)
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  47. Lars Strother, David Van Valkenburg & Michael Kubovy (2003). Toward a Psychophysics of Perceptual Organization Using Multistable Stimuli and Phenomenal Reports. Axiomathes 13 (3-4):283-302.
    We explore experimental methods used to study the phenomena of perceptual organization, first studied by the Gestalt psychologists. We describe an application of traditional psychophysics to perceptual organization and offer alternative methods. Among these, we distinguish two approaches that use multistable stimuli: (1) phenomenological psychophysics, in which the observer's response is assumed to accurately and directly reflect perceptual experience; and (2) the interference paradigm, in which an observer's response is evaluated as correct or incorrect because it pertains to a corrigible (...)
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  48. E. B. Titchener (1920). Prize in Psychophysics. Mind 29 (114):256.
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  49. John Pickett Turner (1914). Prize in Psychophysics. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (1):27.
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  50. F. M. Urban (1933). The Weber-Fechner Law and Mental Measurement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (2):221.
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