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  1. Gwen Adshead (2010). Looking Backward and Forward. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):251-253.
    Philosophy says that life must be understood backwards. But . . . it must be lived forward. . , , It is more and more evident that life can never be really understood in Time. It was a pleasure to read Jason Thompson’s serious and thought-provoking piece, and I am grateful to the editors for giving me a chance to comment. The idea that the self is revealed in narrative is a popular one among different schools of psychotherapy, both in (...)
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  2. Hakam Al-Shawi (2006). Psychotherapy's Philosophical Values: Insight or Absorption? [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):159 - 179.
    According to insight-oriented psychotherapies, the change clients undergo during therapy results from insights gained into the "true" nature of the self, which entail greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. In this paper, I question such claims through a critical examination of the epistemological and metaphysical values underlying such forms of therapy. I claim that such psychotherapeutic practices are engaged in a process that subtly "absorbs" clients into the therapist's philosophical framework which is characterized by a certain problematic conception of subjectivity, knowledge, and (...)
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  3. George Albee (1990). The Futility of Psychotherapy. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3-4):369-384.
    While psychotherapy is helpful to individual clients, the slim cadre of therapists and the vast number of disturbed people precludes any hope that more than a relative few will receive help. Nowhere is the futility of psycotherapy as obvious as among the poor and powerless whose suffering, crowding, and dispair will yield only to social and political solutions. In the United States the expansion of the number of psychiatric diagnoses and the demographic changes in populations will only make larger the (...)
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  4. Peter Alexander & A. MacIntyre (1955). Symposium: Cause and Cure in Psychotherapy. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 29:25 - 58.
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  5. Michaela Amering (2010). Finding Partnership: The Benefit of Sharing and the Capacity for Complexity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):77-79.
  6. Sharon K. Anderson (2010). Ethics for Psychotherapists and Counselors: A Proactive Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Basics of awareness : knowing yourself -- Basics of awareness : privilege and social responsibility -- The process of acculturation : developing your professional ethical identity -- The ethical culture of psychotherapy -- "I can't believe it's not therapy" : boundaries of the psychotherapy relationship -- Confidentiality : a critical element of trust in the relationship -- Informed consent : the three-legged stool -- Making the most of supervision -- Ending psychotherapy : the good, the bad, and the ethical -- (...)
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  7. Patricia A. Areán & Jennifer Alvidrez (2002). Ethical Considerations in Psychotherapy Effectiveness Research: Choosing the Comparison Group. Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):63 – 73.
    The primary purpose behind effectiveness research is to determine whether a treatment with demonstrated efficacy has utility when administered to the general population. The main questions these studies are meant to answer are these: Can the typical patient respond to treatment? Is the treatment acceptable to the typical patient? Can the treatment be administered safely and in its entirety in the typical treatment setting? Is the treatment under study significantly better than the community standard of care both from a cost (...)
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  8. Katherine Arens (1996). Wilhelm Griesinger: Psychiatry Between Philosophy and Praxis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):147-163.
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  9. Kurt Baier (1981). The Ethics of Behavior Modification:Behavior Therapy: Scientific, Philosophical, and Moral Foundations. Edward Erwin; Autonomy Psychotherapy: Authoritarian Control Versus Individual Choice. Lucien A. Buck. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (3):499-.
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  10. Robert L. Barker (1982). The Business of Psychotherapy: Private Practice Administration for Therapists, Counselors, and Social Workers. Columbia University Press.
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  11. F. C. Bartlett (1936). Psychology and Psychotherapy. By William Brown. (London: Edward Arnold and Co.. 1934. Pp. Vii + 252. Price 12s. 6d.). Philosophy 11 (42):229-.
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  12. S. Basescu (1967). Human Nature and Psychotherapy. Humanitas 3 (2):127-137.
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  13. Sergio Benvenuto (2005). Simplistic Complexity: A Discussion on Psychoanalysis and Chaos Theory. World Futures 61 (3):181 – 187.
    Using a couple of Paul Watzlawick's clinical cases as a starting point, the author shows how prescriptive behavioral strategies do not produce predictable effects: the theory of (nonlinear) complex systems prevents us from establishing a precise connection between a so-called psychotherapeutic act and what we consider therapeutic effects. It is precisely the consideration of the "Lorenz attractors" that thus brings us to reconsider the long psychoanalytic work as the condition for a general structural change of subjectivity: the result of this (...)
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  14. Louis S. Berger (1996). Toward a Non-Cartesian Psychotherapeutic Framework: Radical Pragmatism as an Alternative. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):169-184.
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  15. Jurrit Bergsma (1994). The Trauma Triangle. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (4).
    Recent research supports the hypothesis that more active engagement of the patient in occurring illnesses improves quality of life and probably even life expectancy.In this study experience and theoretical knowledge from psychotherapy is transplanted to clinical practice in order to improve the physician''s engagement in the patient-disease relationship. By defining severe and long-term illnesses as a psychotrauma, the transfer of the psychotherapeutical model leads to the creation of a new triangular relationship: patient-illness-doctor. Practical examples are used as illustrations for the (...)
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  16. Jurrit Bergsma & Bertha Mook (1998). Ethical Considerations in Psychotherapeutic Systems. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (4):371-381.
    In the process of individual psychotherapy, the client and the therapist work together towards clarifying the client's problems, unlocking vicious circles, opening new perspectives and creating a new narrative congruent with the client's experiencing. The real and undeniable situation in individual psychotherapy across different therapeutic systems is that therapists enter the therapeutic encounter equipped with their own vision of humanity and their own particular theory and methods of psychotherapy. Through the differences in power between therapists and clients and the powerful (...)
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  17. Paul Biegler (2010). Autonomy and Ethical Treatment in Depression. Bioethics 24 (4):179-189.
    Antidepressant medication and evidence-based psychotherapy have largely equivalent efficacy in the management of the common, less severe grades of depression. As a result, several national guidelines recommend that either can be used in the treatment of this disorder. Psychotherapy, however, differs in that it assists insight into how the depressed person appraises and manages the stressors that frequently trigger depressive episodes. I argue that the self-knowledge achieved through psychotherapy has moral value in that it promotes the autonomy of stressor-related decisions. (...)
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  18. P. Binns (1990). Experimental Evidence and Psychotherapy. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (4):531-552.
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  19. Pamela J. Birrell (2006). An Ethic of Possibility: Relationship, Risk, and Presence. Ethics and Behavior 16 (2):95 – 115.
    What does it mean to be ethical in psychotherapy? Does adherence to ethical codes and rules make a psychotherapist ethical? This article examines standard ways of thinking about ethics in the field and argues that these ways are inadequate, creating a false dichotomy between the ethical and the clinical, and that they are designed only for formal and contractual relationships, in which psychotherapy is more often personal and affecting. The ethic of care and the approach to ethics of Emmanuel Levinas (...)
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  20. Tim Bond (2000). Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action. Sage Publications.
    Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action is the highly acclaimed guide to the major responsibilities which trainees and counselors in practice must be aware of before working with clients. Author Tim Bond outlines the values and ethical principles inherent in counselling and points out that the counselor is at the center of a series of responsibilities: to the client, to him/herself as a counselor and to the wider community. Now fully revised and updated, the second edition examines issues fundamental (...)
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  21. Sally Borbasi (2007). Embodied Enquiry: Phenomenological Touchstones for Research, Psychotherapy and Spirituality, Les Todres: Book Review. [REVIEW] Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2):1-3.
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  22. Edward Boyne (ed.) (2003). Psychotherapy in Ireland. Columba Press.
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  23. Kerry Brace (1992). Nonrelativist Ethical Standards for Goal Setting in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 2 (1):15 – 38.
    In this article, I discuss two principles that can be viewed as universally applicable in psychotherapy and counseling: respect for clients' welfare and respect for their self-determination. Consideration of the practical application of these principles leads to the formulation of a set of guidelines to aid therapists and counselors in making choices about instrumental and end goals. These guidelines are intended to be applicable regardless of the particular personal and cultural values of the therapist and client.
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  24. Kerry Brace & Leon VandeCreek (1991). The Justification of Paternalistic Actions in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):87 – 103.
    This article defines the nature of paternalistic interventions in psychotherapy and discusses reasons why the client's right to consent to treatment is important. We describe a reasoning process developed by Culver and Gert (1982) that can be used to determine when paternalistic actions are and are not ethically justifiable in mental health practice. We demonstrate how this procedure may be applied to psychotherapy by using a number of case illustrations.
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  25. Pat Bracken & Philip Thomas (2010). Is Private (Contract-Based) Practice an Answer to the Problems of Psychiatry? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):241-245.
    We are very grateful to both Matthew Ratcliffe and Thomas Szasz for taking the time to read and respond to our paper. Ratcliffe is broadly sympathetic to our efforts and provides a very convincing argument against mind–body dualisms by drawing on work from the phenomenological tradition. His comments extend rather than challenge our central thesis. Szasz, however, is dismissive of our position. As a result, most of our response is directed to his commentary. Ratcliffe uses the work of van der (...)
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  26. John Bugas & George Silberschatz (2005). How Patients Coach Their Therapists in Psychotherapy. In George Silberschatz (ed.), Transformative Relationships: The Control-Mastery Theory of Psychotherapy. Routledge. 153--167.
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  27. Marshall Bush (2005). The Role of Unconscious Guilt in Psychopathology and in Psychotherapy. In George Silberschatz (ed.), Transformative Relationships: The Control-Mastery Theory of Psychotherapy. Routledge. 43--66.
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  28. John S. Callender (2010). Free Will and Responsibility. A Guide for Practitioners. Oxford University Press.
    This book is aimed primarily at the practitioners of morals such as psychiatrists,lawyers and policy-makers. My professional background is clinical psychiatry It is divided into three parts. The first of these provides an overview of moral theory, morality in non-human species and recent developments in neuroscience that are of relevance to moral and legal responsibility. In the second part I offer a new paradigm of free action based on the overlaps between free will, moral value and art. In the overlap (...)
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  29. David L. Calof (1998). Notes From a Practice Under Siege: Harassment, Defamation, and Intimidation in the Name of Science. Ethics and Behavior 8 (2):161 – 187.
    I have practiced psychotherapy, family therapy, and hypnotherapy for over 25 years without a single board complaint or lawsuit by a client. For over 3 years, however, a group of proponents of the false memory syndrome (FMS) hypothesis, including members, officials, and supporters of the False Memory Syndrome Foundation, Inc., have waged a multimodal campaign of harassment and defamation directed against me, my clinical clients, my staff, my family, and others connected to me. I have neither treated these harassers or (...)
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  30. Louis G. Castonguay (2002). Controlling is Not Enough: The Importance of Measuring the Process and Specific Effectiveness of Psychotherapy Treatment and Control Conditions. Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):31 – 42.
    The major argument of this article is that failing to measure what is taking place in treatment and control conditions can lead to scientifically invalid conclusions. It is argued that researchers are ethically responsible for being aware that variables related to the therapist, client, and the therapeutic relationship (as well as their interaction) might play a confounding role when treatment and control conditions are compared. As a consequence, they should either measure these variables or be tentative in their interpretation of (...)
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  31. Hans W. Cohn (2002). Heidegger and the Roots of Existential Therapy. Continuum.
    `Hans Cohn has given us a personal and valuable statement about the theoretical underpinnings of his work as a psychotherapist. These can be little doubt about his contribution to our thinking practice is invaluable. Students will find Cohn's easygoing exposition of complex ideas enormously helpful' - Professor Emmy van Deurzen, Existential Analysis `One of the most important books published this year. This long-awaited book by the foremost expert on the relationship between Heidegger and psychotherapy, manages to encapsulate the essence of (...)
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  32. Norman Daniels (1983). Can Cognitive Psychotherapy Reconcile Reason and Desire?:A Theory of the Good and the Right. Richard Brandt. Ethics 93 (4):772-.
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  33. Michael Davis (1987). Realistic Utilitarianism and the Social Conditions of Cognitive Psychotherapy. Social Theory and Practice 13 (2):237-259.
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  34. Avinash De Sousa (2012). Professional Boundaries and Psychotherapy: A Review. Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 3 (2).
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  35. C. Wesley Demarco (1998). On the Impossibility of Placebo Effects in Psychotherapy. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):207 – 227.
    Two inimical interpretations of psychotherapy look to many of the same features of empirical research. One camp infers that placebo effects are impossible in principle in psychotherapy; the other camp infers from the same research that psychotherapy is essentially placebo. I examine the crucial discussions and conclude that these opposing evaluations ensue because each group presumes a different baseline from which the significance of the research is gauged. I show how different baselines set different standards of significance and invite different (...)
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  36. Carrie Doehring (2008). A Liberal Protestant Pastoral Theological Approach and the God Image : The Role of God Images in Recovery From Sexual and Physical Abuse. In Glendon Moriarty & Louis Hoffman (eds.), God Image Handbook for Spiritual Counseling and Psychotherapy: Research, Theory, and Practice. Haworth Pastoral Press.
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  37. H. Warren Dunham (1941). Book Review:Psychotherapy--Scientific and Religious. Marcus Gregory. [REVIEW] Ethics 51 (3):368-.
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  38. W. Eliasberg (1946). Philosophy of Psychotherapy. Philosophy of Science 13 (3):203-214.
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  39. Edward Erwin (2011). Evidence-Based Psychotherapy: Values and the A Priori. In Michael J. Shaffer & Michael Veber (eds.), What Place for the a Priori? Open Court. 33.
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  40. Edward Erwin (1996). The Evaluation of Psychotherapy: A Reply to Greenwood. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):642-651.
    John Greenwood (this issue) claims that neglect of an important methodological distinction has contributed directly to the "epistemic impoverishment" of empirical studies of all forms of professional psychotherapy. I challenge this claim, as well as other important claims he makes about the efficacy of psychoanalysis and other forms of psychotherapy.
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  41. Erik Falkum (2009). Phronesis and Techne: The Debate on Evidence-Based Medicine in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):141-149.
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  42. B. A. Farrell (1972). The Validity of Psychotherapy. Inquiry 15 (1-4):146 – 170.
    How good is psychotherapy as a tool of research into human nature? There is an orthodox defence of it as a research tool, which relies on showing that interpretations are true of the patient when they satisfy certain criteria. This defence is examined and rejected. The reply is considered that an interpretation which 'keeps things moving' is true, or an approximation to the truth. This reply is rejected by comparing and contrasting an interpretation in psychotherapy with one from brainwashing sessions. (...)
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  43. Andrew Feldmar (2001). Entheogens and Psychotherapy. Janus Head 4 (1):54-67.
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  44. Colin Feltham (1995). What is Counselling?: The Promise and Problem of the Talking Therapies. Sage Publications.
    "After the first 40 pages I was hooked, and it has been a long time since I have been unable to put a book down unitl it was finished. I would highly recommend this book. Colin Feltham has brought together all the elements that have or do influence counselling, including placing counselling in a social context. As far as this publication goes I have actually put my money where my mouth is and paid for a copy of my own." --Gladeana (...)
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  45. Roger Frie (ed.) (2003). Understanding Experience: Psychotherapy and Postmodernism. Routledge.
    Understanding Experience: Psychotherapy and Postmodernism is a collection of innovative interdisciplinary essays that explore the way we experience and interact with each other and the world around us. The authors address the postmodern debate in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis through clinical and theoretical discussion and offer a view of the person that is unique and relevant today. The clinical work of Binswanger, Boss, Fromm, Fromm-Reichmann, Laing, and Lacan is considered alongside the theories of Buber, Heidegger, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre and others. Combining (...)
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  46. Maurice Friedman (2003). Martin Buber and Dialogical Psychotherapy. In Roger Frie (ed.), Understanding Experience: Psychotherapy and Postmodernism. Routledge.
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  47. Stephen Frosh (2002). After Words: The Personal in Gender, Culture, and Psychotherapy. Palgrave.
    For a long time the human sciences have debated the relationship between social structures--the group, and subjectivity--the individual, with much of the debate centering round areas such as identity, (gender, race, sexuality), discourse, (talk, conversation, the limits of language), and therapy. This book, by a well-known and highly respected academic in the cross-cutting fields of gender studies, therapy, and psychoanalysis, brings together important material on these debates, and provides a substantial contribution to theory on the relationships between psychology, psychotherapy, and (...)
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  48. Lynne Gabriel (2005). Speaking the Unspeakable: The Ethics of Dual Relationships in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Routledge.
    Are dual relationships always detrimental? Speaking the Unspeakable provides an in-depth exploration of client-practitioner dual relationships, offering critical discussion and sustained narrative on thinking about and being in dual relationships. Lynne Gabriel draws on the experiences of both practitioners and clients to provide a clear summary of the complex and multidimensional nature of dual relationships. The beneficial as well as detrimental potential of such relationships is discussed and illustrated with personal accounts. Subjects covered include: · Roles and boundaries in dual (...)
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  49. Jean-Michel Gaillard (2000). Neurobiological Correlates of the Unlocking of the Unconscious. International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy 14 (4):89-107.
  50. Edwin E. Gantt (2001). The Crucible of Experience: RD Laing and the Crisis of Psychotherapy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):94-95.
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