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  1. B. . Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk & M. Thelen (eds.) (2008). Translation and Meaning. Hogeschool Zuyd.
  2. Barbara Abbott (2011). Attitudes Toward Quotation1. In Elke Brendel (ed.), Understanding Quotation. De Gruyter Mouton. 7--35.
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  3. John A. Agius (1992). Quotation Identified. The Chesterton Review 18 (2):312-312.
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  4. Ken Akiba (2005). A Unified Theory of Quotation. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):161–171.
    This paper offers a theory of quotation by uniting two apparently disparate extant theories, Recanati's pragmatic theory and Washington's identity theory. Recanati draws a distinction between open and closed quotations, and contends that open quotations do not refer. Washington argues that closed quotations refer to various expression types, not just orthographic and/or phonetic types. By combining these views, this paper proposes a theory, according to which quotations, open or closed, may be tokens of semantico-physical types (i.e., meaningful expressions), and while (...)
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  5. Yitzhak Benbaji (2004). A Demonstrative Analysis of 'Open Quotation'. Mind and Language 19 (5):534–547.
    A striking feature of Cappelen and Lepore's Davidsonian theory of quotation is the range of the overlooked data to which it offers an elegant semantical analysis. Recently, François Recanati argued for a pragmatic account of quotation, on the basis of new data that Cappelen and Lepore overlooked. In this article I expose what seem to me the weak points in Recanati's alternative approach, and show how proponents of the demonstrative theory can account for the data on which Recanati bases his (...)
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  6. Jonathan Bennett (1988). Quotation. Noûs 22 (3):399-418.
    In his paper “Quotation”, Donald Davidson contrasts three theories about how quotation marks do their work, that is, about how tokens like this one: "sheep” refer to the type of which the following is a token: sheep. He rejects the “proper name” and “spelling” theories, and propounds and defends a new account of quotation which he calls the “demonstrative theory”. I shall argue that the truth about how quotation works has points of resemblance with both the spelling and demonstrative theories, (...)
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  7. Jeanette Bicknell (2001). The Problem of Reference in Musical Quotation: A Phenomenological Approach. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (2):185–191.
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  8. C. W. Bingham (2005). Response to Jon Fennell: “Truth,” “Tradition,” “Quotation Marks”. Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (2):113-116.
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  9. Robert Binkley (1970). Quantifying, Quotation, and a Paradox. Noûs 4 (3):271-277.
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  10. Lisa Block de Behar & William Egginton (eds.) (2002). Borges: The Passion of an Endless Quotation. State University of New York Press.
    Lisa Block de Behar explores the trope of quotation in the works of Jorge Luis Borges.
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  11. Steven E. Boër & William G. Lycan (1980). Who, Me? Philosophical Review 89 (3):427 - 466.
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  12. A. B. Bosworth (1983). Arrian at the Caspian Gates: A Study in Methodology. Classical Quarterly 33 (01):265-.
    In a recent article Professor Brunt has made an eloquent plea for greater rigour in handling the remains of non-extant authors. When the original is lost and we depend I upon quotation, paraphrase or mere citation by later authorities, we must first establish the reliability of the source which supplies the fragment. There is obviously a world of difference between the long verbal quotations in Athenaeus and the disjointed epitomes provided by the periochae of Livy. As a general rule, the (...)
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  13. Andrew Botterell & Robert J. Stainton (2005). Quotation: Compositionality and Innocence Without Demonstration. Critica 37 (110):3-33.
    We discuss two kinds of quotation, namely indirect quotation (e.g., 'Anita said that Mexico is beautiful') and pure quotation (e.g., 'Mexico' has six letters). With respect to each, we have both a negative and a positive plaint. The negative plaint is that the strict Davidsonian (1968, 1979a) treatment of indirect and pure quotation cannot be correct. The positive plaint is an alternative account of how quotation of these two sorts works.
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  14. J. Van Brakel (1985). Buckner Quoting Goldstein and Davidson on Quotation. Analysis 45 (2):73 - 75.
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  15. Manuel Bremer (2011). Truth Value Talk Without Quotation. In Elke Brendel (ed.), Understanding Quotation. De Gruyter Mouton. 7--47.
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  16. Elke Brendel (ed.) (2011). Understanding Quotation. De Gruyter Mouton.
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  17. Elke Brendel, Jörg Meibauer & Markus Steinbach (2011). Exploring the Meaning of Quotation. In Understanding Quotation. De Gruyter Mouton. 133.
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  18. D. K. Buckner (1984). Goldstein on Quotation. Analysis 44 (4):189 - 190.
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  19. Ben Caplan (2002). Quotation and Demonstration. Philosophical Studies 111 (1):69-80.
    In "Demonstratives or Demonstrations", Marga Reimer argues that quotation marks are demonstrations and that expressions enclosed with them are demonstratives. In this paper, I argue against her view. There are two objections. The first objection is that Reimer''s view has unattractive consequences: there is more ambiguity, there are more demonstratives, and there are more English expressions than we thought. The second objection is that, unlike other ambiguous expressions, some expressions that are ambiguous on Reimer''s view can''t be disambiguated by using (...)
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  20. Alessandro Capone (2013). The Pragmatics of Quotation, Explicatures and Modularity of Mind. Pragmatics and Society 4 (3):259-284.
    This paper presents a purely pragmatic account of quotation which, it is argued, will be able to accommodate all relevant linguistic phenomena. Given that it is more parsimonious to explain the data by reference to pragmatic principles only than to explain them by reference to both pragmatic and semantic principles, as is common in the literature, I conclude that the account of quotation I present is to be preferred to the more standard accounts (including the alternative theories of quotation, discussed (...)
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  21. Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore, Quotation. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Starting with Frege, the semantics (and pragmatics) of quotation has received a steady flow of attention over the last one hundred years. It has not, however, been subject to the same kind of intense debate and scrutiny as, for example, both the semantics of definite descriptions and propositional attitude verbs. Many philosophers probably share Davidson's experience: ‘When I was initiated into the mysteries of logic and semantics, quotation was usually introduced as a somewhat shady device, and the introduction was accompanied (...)
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  22. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2006). Quotation, Context Sensitivity, Signs and Expressions. Philosophical Issues 16 (1):43–64.
    Can one and the same quotation be used on different occasions to quote distinct objects? The view that it can is taken for granted throughout the literature (e.g. Goddard & Routley 1966, Christensen 1967, Davidson 1979, Goldstein 1984, Jorgensen et al 1984, Atlas 1989, Clark & Gerrig 1990, Washington 1992, García-Carpintero 1994, 2004, 2005, Reimer 1996, Saka 1998, Wertheimer 1999). Garcia-Carpintero (1994, p. 261) illustrates with the quotation expression ''gone''. He says it can be used to quote any of the (...)
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  23. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2003). Varieties of Quotation Revisited. Belgian Journal of Linguistics (17):51-75.
    This paper develops the view presented in our 1997 paper "Varieties of Quotation". In the first part of the paper we show how phenomena such as scare-quotes, echoing and mimicry can be treated as what we call Speech Act Heuristics. We then defend a semantic account of mixed quotation. Along the way we discuss the role of indexicals in mixed quotation and the noncancelability of reference to words in mixed quotation. We also respond to some objections raised by Recanati, Saka, (...)
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  24. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (1999). Using, Mentioning and Quoting: A Reply to Saka. Mind 108 (432):741-750.
    Paul Saka, in a recent paper, declares that we can use, mention, or quote an expression. Whether a speaker is using or mentioning an expression, on a given occasion, depends on his intentions. An exhibited expression is used, if the exhibiter intends to direct his audience’s attention to the expression’s extension. It is mentioned, if he intends to draw his audience’s attention to something associated with the exhibited token other than its extension. This includes, but is not limited to, an (...)
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  25. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (1998). Reply to Tsohatzidis. Mind 107 (427):665-666.
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  26. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (1997). On an Alleged Connection Between Indirect Speech and the Theory of Meaning. Mind and Language 12 (3&4):278–296.
    A semantic theory T for a language L should assign content to utterances of sentences of L. One common assumption is that T will assign p to some S of L just in case in uttering S a speaker A says that p. We will argue that this assumption is mistaken.
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  27. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (1997). Varieties of Quotation. Mind 106 (423):429-450.
    There are at least four varieties of quotation, including pure, direct, indirect and mixed. A theory of quotation, we argue, should give a unified account of these varieties of quotation. Mixed quotes such as 'Alice said that life is 'difficult to understand'', in which an utterance is directly and indirectly quoted concurrently, is an often overlooked variety of quotation. We show that the leading theories of pure, direct, and indirect quotation are unable to account for mixed quotation and therefore unable (...)
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  28. Hermann Cappelen (1997). The Metaphysics of Signs and the Semantics of Quotation. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    The dissertation is about two issues at an intersection of metaphysics and semantics: the type-token distinction and the semantics of quotation. ;I develop an account of the metaphysics of signs in which word types play no role. Concrete particulars, such as ink marks, sounds, Braille dots, flag wavings in Semaphore, and so on, are of the same type by virtue of the function they have been assigned in what I call 'sign systems'. I argue that even if you start out (...)
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  29. Sheldon M. Cohen (1974). Sentences, Quotation Marks, and Necessary Truth. Philosophical Studies 25 (4):283 - 287.
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  30. Donald Davidson (1979). Quotation. Theory and Decision 11 (1):27-40.
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  31. Philippe De Brabanter (2013). François Recanati's radical pragmatic theory of quotation. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):109-128.
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  32. Philippe de Brabanter (ed.) (2005). Hybrid Quotations. John Benjamins.
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  33. Amy Rose Deal (forthcoming). Nez Perce Embedded Indexicals. In H. Greene (ed.), Semantics of Under-represented Languages in the Americas. GLSA.
    The Nez Perce counterparts of `I', `you', and `here' show "shifty" behavior in attitude reports. I argue that this is not the result of mixed quotation or binding, and should be analyzed via Anand and Nevins-style context shift with Kaplanian monsters.
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  34. Julian Dodd (1997). Indirect Speech, Parataxis and the Nature of Things Said. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:211-227.
    This paper makes the following recommendation when it comes to the IogicaI form of sentences in indirect speech. Davidson’s paratactic account shouId stand, but with one emendation: the demonstrative ‘that’ should be taken to refer to the Fregean Thought expressed by the utterance of the content-sentence, rather than to that utterance itseIf. The argument for this emendation is that it is the onIy way of repIying to the objections to Davidson’s account raised by Schiffer, McFetridge and McDowell.Towards the end of (...)
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  35. Delia Graff Fara (2011). You Can Call Me 'Stupid', ... Just Don't Call Me Stupid. Analysis 71 (3):492-501.
    In this paper I argue that names are predicates when they occur in the appellation position of 'called'-predications. This includes not only proper names, but all names -- including quote-names of proper names and quote-names of other words or phrases. Thus in "You can call me Al", the proper name 'Al' is a predicate. And in "You can call me 'Al'," the quote-name of 'Al' -- namely ' 'Al' ' -- is also a predicate.
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  36. Manuel García-Carpintero (2012). Minimalism on Quotation? Critical Review of Cappelen and Lepore's Language Turned on Itself. Philosophical Studies 161 (2):207-225.
    Research on quotation has mostly focussed in the past years on mixed or open quotation. In a recent book-length discussion of the topic, Cappelen and Lepore have abandon their previous Davidsonian allegiances, proposing a new view that they describe as minimalist, to a good extend on the basis of facts concerning mixed quotation. In this paper I critically review Cappelen and Lepore’s new minimalist proposals, briefly outlining my preferred Davidsonian view as a useful foil. I explore first their allegedly non-Davidsonian, (...)
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  37. Manuel Garcia-Carpintero (2004). The Deferred Ostension Theory of Quotation. Noûs 38 (4):674 - 692.
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  38. Manuel García-Carpintero (1994). Ostensive Signs: Against the Identity Theory of Quotation. Journal of Philosophy 91 (5):253-264.
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  39. Bart Geurts & Emar Maier (2005). Quotation in Context. In Philippe de Brabanter (ed.), Hybrid Quotations. John Benjamins. 109-28.
    It appears that in mixed quotations like the following, the quoted expression is used and mentioned at the same time: (1) George says Tony is his ``bestest friend''. Most theories seek to account for this observation by assuming that mixed quotations operate at two levels of content at once. In contradistinction to such two-dimensional theories, we propose that quotation involves just a single level of content. Quotation always produces a change in meaning of the quoted expression, and if the quotation (...)
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  40. Carlo Ginzburg (1988). Ekphrasis and Quotation. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 50 (1):3 - 19.
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  41. L. Goddard & R. Routley (1966). Use, Mention and Quotation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):1 – 49.
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  42. Laurence Goldstein (1985). The Title of This Paper Is 'Quotation'. Analysis 45 (3):137 - 140.
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  43. Laurence Goldstein (1984). Quotation of Types and Other Types of Quotation. Analysis 44 (1):1 - 6.
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  44. E. Gombrich (1937). A Classical Quotation in Michael Angelo's "Sacrifice of Noah". Journal of the Warburg Institute 1 (1):69.
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  45. Mario Gómez-Torrente (2010). On Quoting the Empty Expression. Philosophical Studies 148 (3):439 - 443.
    Roy Sorensen has argued that a certain technical use of quotation marks to name the empty string supports a revised version of Davidson’s theory of quotation. I point out that Sorensen’s considerations provide no support for Davidson’s original theory, and I show that at best they support the revised Davidsonian theory only to the same extent that they support a simpler revised version of a Tarskian theory.
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  46. Mario Gomez-Torrente (2005). Remarks on Impure Quotation. In Philippe De Brabanter (ed.), Hybrid Quotations. John Benjamins. 129-151.
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  47. Mario Gómez-Torrente (2001). Quotation Revisited. Philosophical Studies 102 (2):123-153.
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  48. Nelson Goodman (1974). On Some Questions Concerning Quotation. The Monist 58 (2):294-306.
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  49. Dorothy Grover (1992). 10. Propositional Quantification and Quotation Contexts. In A Prosentential Theory of Truth. Princeton University Press. 234-243.
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  50. Dorothy Grover (1973). Propositional Quantification and Quotation Contexts. In Hugues Leblanc (ed.), Truth, Syntax and Modality. Amsterdam,North-Holland. 101--110.
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