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  1. Anthony G. Amsterdam (1988). Commentary: Race and the Death Penalty. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (1):2-86.
  2. Judith Colleen Bohr, A People's History of Philosophy: The Development and Ideological Segregation of Black Nationalism.
    The primary objective of this thesis is to advocate for Black Nationalism's full inclusion in the academic field of political philosophy. By bringing the thinkers in the Black Nationalist tradition into this discourse, the field of philosophy stands to gain important insight into the prejudices and unexamined assumptions that plague academia. I will flesh out the nature of these assumptions using the works of Black Nationalists like Angela Davis, George Jackson and Joy James. This will show that reading Black Nationalists (...)
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  3. Bernard Boxill (1993). Book Review:Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement. Dennis Chong. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (3):602-.
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  4. Stuart Gerry Brown (1960). Civil Rights and National Leadership: Eisenhower and Stevenson in the 1950's. Ethics 70 (2):118-134.
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  5. Gregory Lewis Bynum (2011). Kant's Conception of Respect and African American Education Rights. Educational Theory 61 (1):17-40.
    Immanuel Kant envisioned a kind of respect in which one recognizes each human (1) as being not fully comprehensible by any human understanding, (2) as being an end in him- or herself, and (3) as being a potential source of moral law. In this essay, Gregory Lewis Bynum uses this conception of respect as a lens with which to examine African American education rights on three levels: the individual level (the level of individual persons' moral experience and moral significance), the (...)
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  6. Tommy J. Curry (2013). The Fortune of Wells: Ida B. Wells-Barnett's Use of T. Thomas Fortune's Philosophy of Social Agitation as a Prolegomenon to Militant Civil Rights Activism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (4):456-482.
    Jesus Christ may be regarded as the chief spirit of agitation and innovation. He himself declared, “I come not to bring peace, but a sword.” One cannot delve seriously into the centuries of activism and scholarship against racism, Jim Crowism, and the terrorism of lynching without encountering the legacies of Timothy Thomas Fortune and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Black scholars from the 19th century to the present have been inspired by the sociological and economic works of Fortune and Wells. Scholars of (...)
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  7. Tommy J. Curry (2010). Concerning the Underspecialization of Race Theory in American Philosophy: How the Exclusion of Black Sources Affects the Field. The Pluralist 5 (1):44-64.
    Despite the recent rise in articles by American philosophers willing to deal with race, the sophistication of American philosophy's conceptualizations of American racism continues to lag behind other liberal arts fields committed to similar endeavors. Whereas other fields like American studies, history, sociology, and Black studies have found the foundational works of Black scholars essential to "truly" understanding the complexities of racism, American philosophy-driven by the refusal of white philosophers to acknowledge and incorporate the foundational works of Black scholars at (...)
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  8. Peter S. Dillard & Cynthia R. Nielsen (2015). Inmates, Education, and the Public Good: Deploying Catholic Social Thought to Deconstruct the Us‐Versus‐Them Dichotomy. Heythrop Journal 56 (5):769-777.
    Mass incarceration has become a flashpoint in a number of recent political and public policy debates. Consensus about how to balance the just punishment of offenders with the humanitarian goal of providing inmates with genuine opportunities for reconciliation, rehabilitation, and reintegration into society is lacking. Unfortunately, a dualistic “us-versus-them” narrative surrounding these issues has become entrenched, occluding fruitful dialogue and obscuring our ability to see the detrimental effects that our nation’s punitive turn has created. In this essay, we affirm the (...)
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  9. James W. Fox Jr, Intimations of Citizenship: Repressions and Expressions of Equal Citizenship in the Era of Jim CROW.
    On first blush the Jim Crow Era may seem an odd place to locate anything meaningful about democratic, equal citizenship and the promise of the fourteenth amendment. This article argues to the contrary. The period of Jim Crow, in its negation of democratic citizenship, in fact reveals import aspects about the nature of democratic citizenship. This occurred in two ways. First, whites who implemented white supremacy implicitly understood that freedom and citizenship manifest themselves in a multiplicity of spheres, which is (...)
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  10. Eddie Glaude (2001). Pragmatism and Black Identity: An Alternative Approach. Nepantla 2 (2):22.
  11. Ariela J. Gross, 'Of Portuguese Origin': Litigating Identity and Citizenship Among the Little Races in Nineteenth-Century America.
    The history of race in the nineteenth-century United States is often told as a story of black and white in the South, and white and Indian in the West, with little attention to the intersection between black and Indian. This article explores the history of nineteenth-century America's little races - racially ambiguous communities of African, Indian, and European origin up and down the Eastern seaboard. These communities came under increasing pressure in the years leading up to the Civil War and (...)
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  12. Bonnie Honig (2011). "[Un]Dazzled by the Ideal?": Tully's Politics and Humanism in Tragic Perspective. Political Theory 39 (1):138-144.
  13. Annabelle Lever (2011). Treating People as Equals: Ethical Objections to Racial Profiling and the Composition of Juries. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):61 - 78.
    This paper shows that the problem of treating people as equals in a world marked by deep-seated and, often, recalcitrant inequalities has implications for the way we approach the provision of security and justice. On the one hand, it means that racial profiling will generally be unjustified even when it might promote collective interests in security, on the other, it means that we should strive to create racially mixed juries, even in cases where defendant and alleged-victim are of the same (...)
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  14. Dwayne A. Tunstall (2010). Review Essay: An Odd Black Solidarity, Indeed: Tommie Shelby, We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press, 2005). Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (1):111-122.