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  1. Jonathan E. Adler (1991). Double Standards, Racial Equality and the Right Reference Class. Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):69-82.
  2. Andrew Altman (2001). Policy, Principle, and Incrementalism: Dworkin's Jurisprudence of Race. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 5 (3):241-262.
    For several decades, Ronald Dworkinhas been one of the most prominent voicesdefending the legality and justifiability ofrace-conscious programs aimed at undoing thecontinuing effects of prejudice. Writingwithin the framework of a liberal legalphilosophy, he has formulated powerfularguments against the view that color-blindpolicies are the only defensible ones. Nonetheless, I argue that a more completeliberal defense of race-conscious policieswould need to develop and modify Dworkin''s lineof argument. Such a defense would go beyondhis policy-based arguments and incorporatearguments of principle. Race-conscious policiesdo not only (...)
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  3. Anthony G. Amsterdam (1988). Commentary: Race and the Death Penalty. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (1):2-86.
  4. Elizabeth S. Anderson, Racial Integration As a Compelling Interest.
    The premise of this symposium is that the principle and ideal developed in Brown v. Board of Education2 and its successor cases lie at the heart of the rationale for affirmative action in higher education. The principle of the school desegregation cases is that racial segregation is an injustice that demands remediation. The ideal of the school desegregation cases is that racial integration is a positive good, without which “the dream of one Nation, indivisible”3 cannot be realized. Both the principle (...)
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  5. Lawrence Blum (2007). Race, National Ideals, and Civic Virtue. Social Theory and Practice 33 (4):533-556.
  6. James Boettcher (2009). Race, Ideology, and Ideal Theory. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):237-259.
    Abstract: Philosophers who have addressed the problems of enduring racial injustice have been suspicious of the role played by ideal theory in ethics and political philosophy generally, and in contemporary liberal political philosophy in particular. The theoretical marginalization of race in the work of Rawls has led some to charge that ideal theory is at the very least unhelpful in understanding one of the most significant forms of contemporary injustice, and is at worst ideological in the pejorative sense. To explore (...)
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  7. Bernard Boxill (1984). Blacks and Social Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    From Bernard Boxill, professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and editor of Race and Racism, comes a tightly-argued, very illuminating book that will be essential reading for anyone interested in ...
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  8. Bernard R. Boxill (2009). The Right to Independence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):137-156.
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  9. Alexander Brown (2008). Review of Paul Gomberg's "How to Make Opportunity Equal: Race and Contributive Justice&Quot;. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1).
  10. Tommy J. Curry (2013). The Fortune of Wells: Ida B. Wells-Barnett's Use of T. Thomas Fortune's Philosophy of Social Agitation as a Prolegomenon to Militant Civil Rights Activism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (4):456-482.
    Jesus Christ may be regarded as the chief spirit of agitation and innovation. He himself declared, “I come not to bring peace, but a sword.” One cannot delve seriously into the centuries of activism and scholarship against racism, Jim Crowism, and the terrorism of lynching without encountering the legacies of Timothy Thomas Fortune and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Black scholars from the 19th century to the present have been inspired by the sociological and economic works of Fortune and Wells. Scholars of (...)
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  11. Tommy J. Curry (2007). Please Don't Make Me Touch 'Em. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:133-158.
    The unchanging realities of race relations in the United States, recently highlighted by the catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina, demonstrate that Black Americans are still not viewed, treated or protected as citizens in this country. The rates of poverty, disease and incarceration in Black communities have been recognized by some Critical Race Theorists as genocidal acts. Despite the appeal to the international community’s interpretation of human rights, Blacks are still the most impoverished and lethally targeted group in America. Given the “white (...)
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  12. Manuel Davenport (1999). Racist Symbols and Reparations. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):113-114.
  13. Kevin M. Graham (2002). Race and the Limits of Liberalism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (2):219-239.
    This review essay considers three prominent recent works in the philosophy of race: Mills's The Racial Contract, Outlaw's On Race and Philosophy, and McGary's Race and Social <span class='Hi'>Justice</span>. Each of these books has played an important role in convincing social and political philosophers to take race more seriously as a category for theoretical analysis rather than simply as a subject related to certain applied moral and political problems such as affirmative action. Each of these works also wrestles with the (...)
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  14. David Miguel Gray (2013). Racial Norms: A Reinterpretation of Du Bois' “The Conservation of Races”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):465-487.
    I argue that standard explanations of Du Bois' theory of race inappropriately characterize his view as attempting to provide descriptive criteria for races. Such an interpretation makes it both susceptible to Appiah's circularity objection and alienates it from Du Bois' central project of solidarity—which is the central point of “Conservation.” I propose that we should understand his theory as providing a normative account of race: an attempt to characterize what some races should be in terms of what other races are. (...)
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  15. Chad Kautzer (forthcoming). Radical Philosophy: An Introduction. Paradigm Publishers.
  16. Chad Kautzer (2010). Contract and Domination (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (4):pp. 370-373.
  17. Annabelle Lever (2011). Treating People as Equals: Ethical Objections to Racial Profiling and the Composition of Juries. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):61 - 78.
    This paper shows that the problem of treating people as equals in a world marked by deep-seated and, often, recalcitrant inequalities has implications for the way we approach the provision of security and justice. On the one hand, it means that racial profiling will generally be unjustified even when it might promote collective interests in security, on the other, it means that we should strive to create racially mixed juries, even in cases where defendant and alleged-victim are of the same (...)
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  18. Charles W. Mills (2009). Rawls on Race/Race in Rawls. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):161-184.
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  19. Charles W. Mills (1999). European Spectres. Journal of Ethics 3 (2):133-155.
    I argue that race -- the European Spectre of the title -- has received insufficient attention within Marxist theory. Liberal and Marxist accounts of modernity differ on various points, but agree in characterizing modern society/capitalism as marked by the collapse of ancient and medieval status distinctions and the corresponding emergence of moral and juridical egalitarianism. But this basically Eurocentric narrative ignores the new system of ascriptive hierarchy established by European expansionism: white supremacy. Particularly in the United States, I suggest, race (...)
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  20. Dwayne A. Tunstall (2010). Review Essay: An Odd Black Solidarity, Indeed: Tommie Shelby, We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press, 2005). Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (1):111-122.
  21. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther & Jonathan Michael Kaplan (2013). Ontologies and Politics of Biogenomic 'Race'. Theoria. A Journal of Social and Political Theory (South Africa) 60 (3):54-80.
    All eyes are turned towards genomic data and models as the source of knowledge about whether human races exist or not. Will genomic science make the final decision about whether racial realism (e.g., racial population naturalism) or anti-realism (e.g., racial skepticism) is correct? We think not. We believe that the results of even our best and most impressive genomic technologies underdetermine whether bio-genomic races exist, or not. First, different sub-disciplines of biology interested in population structure employ distinct concepts, aims, measures, (...)
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