This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
42 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. Jonathan E. Adler (1991). Double Standards, Racial Equality and the Right Reference Class. Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):69-82.
  2. Muneer I. Ahmad, A Rage Shared by Law: Post-September 11 Racial Violence as Crimes of Passion.
    September 11 will long be associated with unthinkable violence. The sheer magnitude of the terrorist attacks, the visual imagery of the collapsing towers of the World Trade Center, and the extensive media attention given to the victims have defined the violence of September 11 in unitary terms. But in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks, another form of violence spread across the country: in the days and weeks after September 11, over one thousand bias incidents against Arabs, Muslims, and South (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. Andrew Altman (2001). Policy, Principle, and Incrementalism: Dworkin's Jurisprudence of Race. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 5 (3):241-262.
    For several decades, Ronald Dworkinhas been one of the most prominent voicesdefending the legality and justifiability ofrace-conscious programs aimed at undoing thecontinuing effects of prejudice. Writingwithin the framework of a liberal legalphilosophy, he has formulated powerfularguments against the view that color-blindpolicies are the only defensible ones. Nonetheless, I argue that a more completeliberal defense of race-conscious policieswould need to develop and modify Dworkin''s lineof argument. Such a defense would go beyondhis policy-based arguments and incorporatearguments of principle. Race-conscious policiesdo not only (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Anthony G. Amsterdam (1988). Commentary: Race and the Death Penalty. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (1):2-86.
  5. Elizabeth S. Anderson, Racial Integration As a Compelling Interest.
    The premise of this symposium is that the principle and ideal developed in Brown v. Board of Education2 and its successor cases lie at the heart of the rationale for affirmative action in higher education. The principle of the school desegregation cases is that racial segregation is an injustice that demands remediation. The ideal of the school desegregation cases is that racial integration is a positive good, without which “the dream of one Nation, indivisible”3 cannot be realized. Both the principle (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Eric Anthamatten, Anders Benander, Natalie Cisneros, Michael DeWilde, Vincent Greco, Timothy Greenlee, Spoon Jackson, Arlando Jones, Drew Leder, Chris Lenn, John Douglas Macready, Lisa McLeod, William Muth, Cynthia Nielsen, Aislinn O’Donnell & Andre Pierce (2014). Philosophy Imprisoned: The Love of Wisdom in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Lexington Books.
    Editors Sarah Tyson and Joshua M. Hall convene an international group of philosophical thinkers—from both inside and outside prison walls—who draw on a variety of historical figures and critical perspectives to think about prisons in our new historical era.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. L. Balfour (2012). Multiracial Democracy Between Past and Future. Political Theory 40 (1):108-115.
  8. John A. Berteaux (2010). Darby, Derrick . Rights, Race, and Recognition . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009 . Pp. 194. $90.00 (Cloth); $32.99 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (3):592-595.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Walter E. Block & Violet Obioha (2012). War on Black Men: Arguments for the Legalization of Drugs. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (2):106-120.
    Abstract The leadership of the black community is concerned with welfare, with equality, with unemployment, with discrimination, with racism, with the pay gap, and with dozens of other such traditional issues. Oh, yes, they are also apprehensive about the use of addictive drugs. But, as we speak, young male members of this community are being incarcerated at frightful rates, and, even worse, are killing each other to boot. One would think that this latter issue would occupy the interest of black (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Lawrence Blum (2007). Race, National Ideals, and Civic Virtue. Social Theory and Practice 33 (4):533-556.
  11. Lawrence Blum (2002). Global Inequality and Race. Philosophical Topics 30 (2):291-324.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. James Boettcher (2009). Race, Ideology, and Ideal Theory. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):237-259.
    Abstract: Philosophers who have addressed the problems of enduring racial injustice have been suspicious of the role played by ideal theory in ethics and political philosophy generally, and in contemporary liberal political philosophy in particular. The theoretical marginalization of race in the work of Rawls has led some to charge that ideal theory is at the very least unhelpful in understanding one of the most significant forms of contemporary injustice, and is at worst ideological in the pejorative sense. To explore (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Anthony Bogues (2001). Review of the Racial Contract by Charles Mills'. [REVIEW] Constellations 8 (2):267-285.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Bernard Boxill (2010). Comments on Professors Gines, Mills, and Shelby. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (3):385-397.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Bernard Boxill (1984). Blacks and Social Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    From Bernard Boxill, professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and editor of Race and Racism, comes a tightly-argued, very illuminating book that will be essential reading for anyone interested in ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  16. Bernard R. Boxill (2009). The Right to Independence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):137-156.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Jan Boxill (1992). Racism and Justice. Teaching Philosophy 15 (3):285-287.
  18. Alexander Brown (2008). Review of Paul Gomberg's "How to Make Opportunity Equal: Race and Contributive Justice". [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1).
  19. M. Cholbi (2006). Race, Capital Punishment, and the Cost of Murder. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):255-282.
    Numerous studies indicate that racial minorities are both more likely to be executed for murder and that those who murder them are less likely to be executed than if they murder whites. Death penalty opponents have long attempted to use these studies to argue for a moratorium on capital punishment. Whatever the merits of such arguments, they overlook the fact that such discrimination alters the costs of murder; racial discrimination imposes higher costs on minorities for murdering through tougher sentences, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Tommy J. Curry (2012). The Fortune of Wells: Ida B. Wells-Barnett's Use of T. Thomas Fortune's Philosophy of Social Agitation as a Prolegomenon to Militant Civil Rights Activism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (4):456-482.
    Jesus Christ may be regarded as the chief spirit of agitation and innovation. He himself declared, “I come not to bring peace, but a sword.” One cannot delve seriously into the centuries of activism and scholarship against racism, Jim Crowism, and the terrorism of lynching without encountering the legacies of Timothy Thomas Fortune and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Black scholars from the 19th century to the present have been inspired by the sociological and economic works of Fortune and Wells. Scholars of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Tommy J. Curry (2007). Please Don't Make Me Touch 'Em'. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:133-158.
    The unchanging realities of race relations in the United States, recently highlighted by the catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina, demonstrate that Black Americans are still not viewed, treated or protected as citizens in this country. The rates of poverty, disease and incarceration in Black communities have been recognized by some Critical Race Theorists as genocidal acts. Despite the appeal to the international community’s interpretation of human rights, Blacks are still the most impoverished and lethally targeted group in America. Given the “white (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Manuel Davenport (1999). Racist Symbols and Reparations. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):113-114.
  23. Peter DeAngelis (2014). Racial Profiling and the Presumption of Innocence. Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy (1):43-58.
    I argue that a compelling way to articulate what is wrong with racial profiling in policing is to view racial profiling as a violation of the presumption of innocence. I discuss the communicative nature of the presumption of innocence as an expression of social trust and a protection against the social condemnation of being undeservingly investigated, prosecuted, and convicted for committing a crime. I argue that, given its communicative dimension, failures to extend the presumption of innocence are an expression of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Peter S. Dillard & Cynthia R. Nielsen (2015). Inmates, Education, and the Public Good: Deploying Catholic Social Thought to Deconstruct the Us‐Versus‐Them Dichotomy. Heythrop Journal 56 (5):769-777.
    Mass incarceration has become a flashpoint in a number of recent political and public policy debates. Consensus about how to balance the just punishment of offenders with the humanitarian goal of providing inmates with genuine opportunities for reconciliation, rehabilitation, and reintegration into society is lacking. Unfortunately, a dualistic “us-versus-them” narrative surrounding these issues has become entrenched, occluding fruitful dialogue and obscuring our ability to see the detrimental effects that our nation’s punitive turn has created. In this essay, we affirm the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Jeremy Dunham & Holly Lawford-Smith (forthcoming). Offsetting Race Privilege. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    For all the talk there has been lately about privilege, few have commented on the moral obligations that are associated with having privilege. Those who have commented haven't gone much beyond the idea that the privileged should be conscious of their privilege, should listen to those who don't have it. Here we want to go further, and build an account of the moral obligations of those with a particular kind of privilege: race privilege. In this paper we articulate an understanding (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Kevin M. Graham (2002). Race and the Limits of Liberalism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (2):219-239.
    This review essay considers three prominent recent works in the philosophy of race: Mills's The Racial Contract, Outlaw's On Race and Philosophy, and McGary's Race and Social Justice. Each of these books has played an important role in convincing social and political philosophers to take race more seriously as a category for theoretical analysis rather than simply as a subject related to certain applied moral and political problems such as affirmative action. Each of these works also wrestles with the question (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. David Miguel Gray (2013). Racial Norms: A Reinterpretation of Du Bois' “The Conservation of Races”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):465-487.
    I argue that standard explanations of Du Bois' theory of race inappropriately characterize his view as attempting to provide descriptive criteria for races. Such an interpretation makes it both susceptible to Appiah's circularity objection and alienates it from Du Bois' central project of solidarity—which is the central point of “Conservation.” I propose that we should understand his theory as providing a normative account of race: an attempt to characterize what some races should be in terms of what other races are. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Ariela J. Gross, 'Of Portuguese Origin': Litigating Identity and Citizenship Among the Little Races in Nineteenth-Century America.
    The history of race in the nineteenth-century United States is often told as a story of black and white in the South, and white and Indian in the West, with little attention to the intersection between black and Indian. This article explores the history of nineteenth-century America's little races - racially ambiguous communities of African, Indian, and European origin up and down the Eastern seaboard. These communities came under increasing pressure in the years leading up to the Civil War and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Chad Kautzer (2015). Radical Philosophy: An Introduction. Routledge.
    In this accessible introduction for students, teachers, and activists, Chad Kautzer guides readers through the dynamic field of radical philosophy. Kautzer s innovative approach is to organize the analysis of radical philosophical projects from Marxism, feminism, and queer theory to radical environmental, race, and political theory around their defining methodological commitments and emancipatory goals. Beginning with a discussion of the historical, dialectical, and reflexive forms of critique these projects employ, Radical Philosophy reveals the internal structure and overlapping similarities of particular (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Chad Kautzer (2010). Contract and Domination. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (4):370-373.
  31. Annabelle Lever (2011). Treating People as Equals: Ethical Objections to Racial Profiling and the Composition of Juries. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):61 - 78.
    This paper shows that the problem of treating people as equals in a world marked by deep-seated and, often, recalcitrant inequalities has implications for the way we approach the provision of security and justice. On the one hand, it means that racial profiling will generally be unjustified even when it might promote collective interests in security, on the other, it means that we should strive to create racially mixed juries, even in cases where defendant and alleged-victim are of the same (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Rafe McGregor (2016). The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe Heather Mac Donald, 2016 New York: Encounter Books 248 Pp., $23.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Charles W. Mills (2009). Rawls on Race/Race in Rawls. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):161-184.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34. Charles W. Mills (1999). European Spectres. Journal of Ethics 3 (2):133-155.
    I argue that race -- the European Spectre of the title -- has received insufficient attention within Marxist theory. Liberal and Marxist accounts of modernity differ on various points, but agree in characterizing modern society/capitalism as marked by the collapse of ancient and medieval status distinctions and the corresponding emergence of moral and juridical egalitarianism. But this basically Eurocentric narrative ignores the new system of ascriptive hierarchy established by European expansionism: white supremacy. Particularly in the United States, I suggest, race (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Toula Nicolacopoulos (2014). Indigenous Sovereignty and the Being of the Occupier. Re.Press.
    Without exception, everyone is called upon today to construct his/her patriotic identity as a response to the supreme imperative of our shared whiteness: ‘act as if the land were initially without owners’. For white Australia, this imperative is more primordial than the usual formulation of the call to patriotism: ‘be prepared to sacrifice yourself for your country’, since patriotic sacrifice presupposes that one already has a country to which one is devoted. The imperative of whiteness touches the depth of our (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2013). Foucault, Douglass, Fanon, and Scotus in Dialogue: On Social Construction and Freedom. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Through examining Douglass's and Fanon's concrete experiences of oppression, Cynthia R. Nielsen demonstrates the empirical validity of Foucault's theoretical analyses concerning power, resistance, and subject-formation. Going beyond merely confirming Foucault's insights, Douglass and Fanon expand, strengthen, and offer correctives to the emancipatory dimensions of Foucault's project. Unlike Foucault, Douglass and Fanon were not hesitant to make transhistorical judgments condemning slavery and colonization. Foucault's reticence here signals a weakness in his account of human being. This weakness sets him at cross-purposes not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2011). Resistance Through Re-Narration: Fanon on De-Constructing Racialized Subjectivities. African Identies 9 (4):363-385.
    Frantz Fanon offers a lucid account of his entrance into the white world where the weightiness of the ‘white gaze’ nearly crushed him. In chapter five of Black Skins, White Masks, he develops his historico-racial and epidermal racial schemata as correctives to Merleau-Ponty’s overly inclusive corporeal schema. Experientially aware of the reality of socially constructed (racialized) subjectivities, Fanon uses his schemata to explain the creation, maintenance, and eventual rigidification of white-scripted ‘blackness’. Through a re-telling of his own experiences of racism, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Grant J. Silva (2015). Embodying a "New" Color Line: Racism, Ant-Immigrant Sentiment and Racial Identities in the "Post-Racial" Era. Knowledge Cultures 3 (1).
    This essay explores the intersection of racism, racial embodiment theory and the recent hostility aimed at immigrants and foreigners in the United States, especially the targeting of people of Latin American descent and Latino/as. Anti-immigrant and anti-foreigner sentiment is racist. It is the embodiment of racial privilege for those who wield it and the materiality of racial difference for those it is used against. This manifestation of racial privilege and difference rests upon a redrawing of the color line that is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Steven Swartzer (2016). Review of Amy E. Lerman and Vesla M. Weaver, Arresting Citizenship: The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (3):840-845.
  40. Dwayne A. Tunstall (2010). Review Essay: An Odd Black Solidarity, Indeed: Tommie Shelby, We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press, 2005). Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (1):111-122.
  41. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther & Jonathan Michael Kaplan (2013). Ontologies and Politics of Biogenomic 'Race'. Theoria. A Journal of Social and Political Theory (South Africa) 60 (3):54-80.
    All eyes are turned towards genomic data and models as the source of knowledge about whether human races exist or not. Will genomic science make the final decision about whether racial realism (e.g., racial population naturalism) or anti-realism (e.g., racial skepticism) is correct? We think not. We believe that the results of even our best and most impressive genomic technologies underdetermine whether bio-genomic races exist, or not. First, different sub-disciplines of biology interested in population structure employ distinct concepts, aims, measures, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  42. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther, Roberta L. Millstein & Rasmus Nielsen (2015). Introduction: Genomics and Philosophy of Race. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 52:1-4.
    This year’s topic is “Genomics and Philosophy of Race.” Different researchers might work on distinct subsets of the six thematic clusters below, which are neither mutually exclusive nor collectively exhaustive: (1) Concepts of ‘Race’; (2) Mathematical Modeling of Human History and Population Structure; (3) Data and Technologies of Human Genomics; (4) Biological Reality of Race; (5) Racialized Selves in a Global Context; (6) Pragmatic Consequences of ‘Race Talk’ among Biologists.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography