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  1. Linda Martn Alcoff (2006). Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self. OUP Usa.
    Visible Identities critiques the critiques of identity and of identity politics and argues that identities are real but not necessarily a political problem. Moreover, the book explores the material infrastructure of gendered identity, the experimental aspects of racial subjectivity for both whites and non-whites, and in several chapters looks specifically at Latio identity.
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  2. Lawrie Balfour (1998). "A Most Disagreeable Mirror": Race Consciousness as Double Consciousness. Political Theory 26 (3):346-369.
  3. Kimberly W. Benston (1993). The Veil of Black: (Un)Masking the Subject of African-American Modernism's “Native Son”. Human Studies 16 (1-2):69 - 99.
  4. Joshua Glasgow (2009). In Defense of a Four-Part Theory: Replies to Hardimon, Haslanger, Mallon, and Zack. Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy 5 (2):1-18.
  5. Lewis R. Gordon (2003). African-American Existential Philosophy. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub.
  6. Cressida J. Heyes (2006). Changing Race, Changing Sex: The Ethics of Self-Transformation. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):266-282.
  7. Yalonda Howze & David Weberman (2001). On Racial Kinship. Social Theory and Practice 27 (3):419-436.
  8. Emily S. Lee (2008). A Phenomenology for Homi Bhabha's Postcolonial Metropolitan Subject. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):537-557.
    Homi Bhabha attends to the figure of the postcolonial metropolitan subject-a racialized subject who is not representative of the first world, yet a symbol of the metropolitan sphere. Bhabha describes theirdaily lives as inextricably split or doubled. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when one is caught in not knowing, in focusing attention, and in developing understanding. Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology with the openness in the horizon of the gestaltian framework better accounts for such splits as moments on the (...)
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  9. David Weberman (2001). On Racial Kinship. Social Theory and Practice 27 (3):419-436.
  10. George Yancy (2005). Whiteness and the Return of the Black Body. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):215-241.