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  1. Muneer I. Ahmad, A Rage Shared by Law: Post-September 11 Racial Violence as Crimes of Passion.
    September 11 will long be associated with unthinkable violence. The sheer magnitude of the terrorist attacks, the visual imagery of the collapsing towers of the World Trade Center, and the extensive media attention given to the victims have defined the violence of September 11 in unitary terms. But in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks, another form of violence spread across the country: in the days and weeks after September 11, over one thousand bias incidents against Arabs, Muslims, and South (...)
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  2. Linda Martin Alcoff, Comparative Race, Comparative Racisms (2007).
  3. Linda Martín Alcoff (2005). Latino Oppression. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):536–545.
  4. Linda Martín Alcoff (2003). Latino/as, Asian Americans, and the Black–White Binary. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):5-27.
    This paper aims to contribute toward coalitionbuilding by showing that, even if we try tobuild coalition around what might look like ourmost obvious common concern – reducing racism –the dominant discourse of racial politics inthe United States inhibits an understanding ofhow racism operates vis-à-vis Latino/as andAsian Americans, and thus proves more of anobstacle to coalition building than an aid. Theblack/white paradigm, which operates to governracial classifications and racial politics inthe U.S., takes race in the U.S. to consist ofonly two racial (...)
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  5. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell. 235-262.
  6. Anita L. Allen (1994). Book Review:African-American Perspectives on Biomedical Ethics. Harley E. Flack, Edmund D. Pelligrino. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (2):404-.
  7. Andrew Altman (2001). Policy, Principle, and Incrementalism: Dworkin's Jurisprudence of Race. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 5 (3):241-262.
    For several decades, Ronald Dworkinhas been one of the most prominent voicesdefending the legality and justifiability ofrace-conscious programs aimed at undoing thecontinuing effects of prejudice. Writingwithin the framework of a liberal legalphilosophy, he has formulated powerfularguments against the view that color-blindpolicies are the only defensible ones. Nonetheless, I argue that a more completeliberal defense of race-conscious policieswould need to develop and modify Dworkin''s lineof argument. Such a defense would go beyondhis policy-based arguments and incorporatearguments of principle. Race-conscious policiesdo not only (...)
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  8. Alison Bailey and, Taking Responsibility for Community Violence.
    This article examines the responses of two communities to hate crimes in their cities. In particular it explores how community understandings of responsibility shape collective responses to hate crimes. I use the case of Bridesberg, Pennsylvania to explore how anti-racist work is restricted by backward-looking conceptions of moral responsibility (e.g. being responsible). Using recent writings in feminist ethics.(1) I argue for a forward-looking notion that advocates an active view: taking responsibility for attitudes and behaviors that foster climates in which hate (...)
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  9. Jami L. Anderson (ed.) (2003). Race, Gender, and Sexuality: Philosophical Issues of Identity and Justice. Prentice Hall.
    This anthology of contemporary articles (and court cases provides a philosophical analysis of race, sex and gender concepts and issues. Divided into three relatively independent yet thematically linked sections, the anthology first addresses identity issues, then injustices and inequalities, and then specific social and legal issues relevant to race, sex and gender. By exposing readers to both theoretical foundations, opposing views, and "real life" applications, the anthology prepares them to make critically reasoned decisions concerning today's race, gender and sex social (...)
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  10. Jami L. Anderson (2002). The White Closet. Social Philosophy Today 18:97-107.
    Whiteness theorists argue that whiteness has two essential features. First, whiteness colonizes, appropriates and controls the Other. Whiteness is, then, racist.Second, whiteness is constructed unwittingly. Whites are, it is claimed, unaware of the harms they inflict on a genocidal scale because whiteness, like the air we breathe, is “invisible” to those who construct it and are constructed by it. Whiteness is, then, innocent. I think defining whiteness as innocent racism is troubling for two reasons. First, it leaves whites unaccountable for (...)
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  11. James Avis (1988). White Ethnicity White Racism: Teacher and Student Perceptions of FE. Journal of Moral Education 17 (1):52-60.
    Abstract The paper considers the way in which white teachers and students make sense of ?race? in a multiracial college of further education. It argues that within white cultural forms there are two main ways of comprehending race, the ?nationalistic? and ?liberal?. It suggests however that these two forms are interrelated and that paradoxically the nationalistic may feed in and support a white ?liberalism?. It is argued that the liberal form's denial of structure serves to sustain a white racism. On (...)
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  12. Ellen W. Bernal (2006). What We Do Not Know About Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in End-of-Life Treatment Decisions. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):21 – 23.
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  13. Magali Bessone (2013). Will the Real Tolerant Racist Please Stand Up? Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):209-223.
    One of the most perplexing paradoxes of toleration concerns the ‘tolerant racist’. According to most current definitions of toleration, a person is considered tolerant if, and only if, 1) he refrains from interfering with something 2) he deeply disapproves of, 3) in spite of having the power to interfere. Hence, a racist who refrains from discriminating against members of races he considers inferior despite having the power to do so, should be considered a tolerant person. Moreover, a person can apparently (...)
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  14. Miro Brada, Redirection of Talent.
    The interview with economist William Baumol, published in 2003 in weekly Respekt, deals with alternative activities for talented individuals. If they can't pursue productive activities (technological innovations) they go for rent-seeking activities or activities with negligible social return (e.g. chess). I also present a thesis, that if there is no sophisticated alternative activities, the talent may be redirected into pathological ones: psychopathy, neurosis, paranoia, psychosis... The article was exhibited in Holland Park, W8 6LU, The Ice House between 18. Oct - (...)
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  15. C. Colwell (1995). Typology, Racism, and The Bell Curve. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 6 (2):103-111.
  16. J. Angelo Corlett (2005). Race, Racism, and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):568–585.
  17. Kimberle Crenshaw (1989). Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics. The University of Chicago Legal Forum 140:139-167.
  18. Adam M. Croom (2014). Slurs, Stereotypes, and in-Equality: A Critical Review of “How Epithets and Stereotypes Are Racially Unequal”. Language Sciences 44:1-16.
    Are racial slurs always offensive and are racial stereotypes always negative? How, if at all, are racial slurs and stereotypes different and unequal for members of different races? Questions like these and others about slurs and stereotypes have been the focus of much research and hot debate lately, and in a recent article Embrick and Henricks (2013) aimed to address some of the aforementioned questions by investigating the use of racial slurs and stereotypes in the workplace. Embrick and Henricks (2013) (...)
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  19. Tommy J. Curry (2010). Concerning the Underspecialization of Race Theory in American Philosophy: How the Exclusion of Black Sources Affects the Field. The Pluralist 5 (1):44-64.
    Despite the recent rise in articles by American philosophers willing to deal with race, the sophistication of American philosophy's conceptualizations of American racism continues to lag behind other liberal arts fields committed to similar endeavors. Whereas other fields like American studies, history, sociology, and Black studies have found the foundational works of Black scholars essential to "truly" understanding the complexities of racism, American philosophy-driven by the refusal of white philosophers to acknowledge and incorporate the foundational works of Black scholars at (...)
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  20. Peter DeAngelis (2014). Racial Profiling and the Presumption of Innocence. Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy (1):43-58.
    I argue that a compelling way to articulate what is wrong with racial profiling in policing is to view racial profiling as a violation of the presumption of innocence. I discuss the communicative nature of the presumption of innocence as an expression of social trust and a protection against the social condemnation of being undeservingly investigated, prosecuted, and convicted for committing a crime. I argue that, given its communicative dimension, failures to extend the presumption of innocence are an expression of (...)
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  21. Luc Faucher & Edouard Machery (2009). Racism: Against Jorge Garcia's Moral and Psychological Monism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (1):41-62.
    In this article, we argue that it can be fruitful for philosophers interested in the nature and moral significance of racism to pay more attention to psychology. We do this by showing that psychology provides new arguments against Garcia's views about the nature and moral significance of racism. We contend that some scientific studies of racial cognition undermine Garcia's moral and psychological monism about racism: Garcia disregards (1) the rich affective texture of racism and (2) the diversity of what makes (...)
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  22. James W. Fox Jr, Intimations of Citizenship: Repressions and Expressions of Equal Citizenship in the Era of Jim CROW.
    On first blush the Jim Crow Era may seem an odd place to locate anything meaningful about democratic, equal citizenship and the promise of the fourteenth amendment. This article argues to the contrary. The period of Jim Crow, in its negation of democratic citizenship, in fact reveals import aspects about the nature of democratic citizenship. This occurred in two ways. First, whites who implemented white supremacy implicitly understood that freedom and citizenship manifest themselves in a multiplicity of spheres, which is (...)
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  23. J. L. A. Garcia (2011). Racism, Psychology, and Morality: Dialogue with Faucher and Machery. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (2):250-268.
    I here respond to several points in Faucher and Machery’s vigorous and informative critique of my volitional account of racism (VAR). First, although the authors deem it a form of "implicit racial bias," a mere tendency to associate black people with "negative" concepts falls short of racial "bias" or prejudice in the relevant sense. Second, such an associative disposition need not even be morally objectionable. Third, even for more substantial forms of implicit racial bias such as race-based fear or disgust, (...)
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  24. James A. Goldston (2006). Holes in the Rights Framework: Racial Discrimination, Citizenship, and the Rights of Noncitizens. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):321–347.
    This essay explores how human rights norms—particularly the body of law that forbids discrimination on grounds of racial or ethnic origin—can be deployed to combat the worst effects of citizenship denial and ill-treatment of non-citizens.
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  25. Trudier Harris-Lopez (2003). Lynching and Burning Rituals in African American Literature. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  26. Christopher Herrera (1993). Racial Discrimination is Distinct, If Not “Special”. Journal of Value Inquiry 27 (2):239-242.
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  27. Jonathan Kaplan & Andrew Valls (2007). Housing Discrimination As a Basis for Black Reparations. Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (3):255-274.
    The renewed interest in the issue of black reparations, both in the public sphere and among scholars, is a welcome development because the racial injustices of the past continue to shape American society by disadvantaging African Americans in a variety of ways. Attention to the past and how it has shaped present-day inequality seems essential both to understanding our predicament and to justifying policies that would address and undermine racial inequality. Given this, any argument for policies designed to pursue racial (...)
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  28. David Haekwon Kim (1999). Contempt and Ordinary Inequality. In Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.), Racism and Philosophy.
  29. David Haekwon Kim & Ronald Sundstrom (2014). Xenophobia and Racism. Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1).
    Xenophobia is conceptually distinct from racism. Xenophobia is also distinct from nativism. Furthermore, theories of racism are largely ensconced in nationalized narratives of racism, often influenced by the black-white binary, which obscures xenophobia and shelters it from normative critiques. This paper addresses these claims, arguing for the first and last, and outlining the second. Just as philosophers have recently analyzed the concept of racism, clarifying it and pinpointing why it’s immoral and the extent of its moral harm, so we will (...)
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  30. E. J. King (1956). Segregation and American Society. British Journal of Educational Studies 5 (1):3 - 14.
  31. Carl Knight (2013). The Injustice of Discrimination. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):47-59.
    Discrimination might be considered unjust on account of the comparative disadvantage it imposes, the absolute disadvantage it imposes, the disrespect it shows, or the prejudice it shows. This article argues that each of these accounts overlooks some cases of unjust discrimination. In response to this state of affairs we might combine two or more of these accounts. A promising approach combines the comparative disadvantage and absolute disadvantage accounts.
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  32. John LaFarge (1939). The Negro, Too, In American History. Thought 14 (4):662-664.
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  33. M. Lambert (2005). Proto-Racism B. Isaac: The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity . Pp. Xiv + 563, Ills. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2004. Cased, £29.95. ISBN: 0-691-11691-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):658-.
  34. Matt Lamkin (2011). Racist Appearance Standards and the Enhancements That Love Them: Norman Daniels and Skin-Lightening Cosmetics. Bioethics 25 (4):185-191.
    Darker skin correlates with reduced opportunities and negative health outcomes. Recent discoveries related to the genes associated with skin tone, and the historical use of cosmetics to conform to racist appearance standards, suggest effective skin-lightening products may soon become available. This article examines whether medical interventions of this sort should be permitted, subsidized, or restricted, using Norman Daniels's framework for determining what justice requires in terms of protecting health. I argue that Daniels's expansive view of the requirements of justice in (...)
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  35. Harry Lesser (1984). Can Racial Discrimination Be Proved? Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (2):253-261.
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  36. Michael E. Levin (1981). Is Racial Discrimination Special? Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (3):225-234.
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  37. Joseph W. Long (2001). The Logical Mistake of Racism. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (1):47-51.
    In this paper, I will explore and attempt to define one very important type of egregious discrimination of persons, racism. I will argue that racism involves a kind of logical mistake; specifically. I hope to show that racists commit the naturalistic fallacy. Finally, I will defend my account of racism against two challenges, the most important of which argues that if racism is merely a logical error then racists are not morally culpable.
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  38. Lawrence McNamara, Review of Neil Addison, Religious Discrimination and Hatred Law (Routledge-Cavendish 2007). [REVIEW]
    The place of religion in society and modernity is among the most contentious political issues in the first decade of the 21st century. Faith has been remarkably resilient and resurgent in the face of the secularisation that has characterised Western liberal democracies since the Enlightenment. This heightened sensitivity to and significance of the relationships between religion and politics make Neil Addison's attention to the way that law regulates religious discrimination and hatred a timely contribution. This review looks at the ways (...)
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  39. José Jorge Mendoza (2014). Discrimination and the Presumptive Rights of Immigrants. Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1):68-83.
    Philosophers have assumed that as long as discriminatory admission and exclusion policies are off the table, it is possible for one to adopt a restrictionist position on the issue of immigration without having to worry that this position might entail discriminatory outcomes. The problem with this assumption emerges, however,when two important points are taken into consideration. First, immigration controls are not simply discriminatory because they are based on racist or ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs, but can themselves also be the source (...)
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  40. José Jorge Mendoza (2012). Immigration: The Missing Requirement for an Ethics of Race. Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):359-364.
    In her book, The Ethics and Mores of Race, Naomi Zack offers her readers a critical and historical examination of philosophical ethics. This comprehensive and illuminating examination of philosophical ethics concludes by yielding twelve requirements for an ethics of race. While these twelve requirements are not in-themselves an ethics of race, the hope is that these requirements will be sufficient to finally allow us to explicitly engage in ethical treatments of race. My view is that Zack’s argument is basically on (...)
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  41. Lydia L. Moland (2008). Grasping the 'Raw I': Race and Tragedy in Philip Roth's 'The Human Stain'. Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities 2 (2).
    Philip Roth’s novel 'The Human Stain' recounts an instance of racial passing: its protagonist, Coleman Silk, is African-American but light-skinned enough to pass as white. Coleman’s decision to pass and his subsequent violent death, I argue, confront us with complex ethical questions regarding unjust social roles, loyalty, and moral luck. I also argue, building on Hegel’s definition of tragedy, that 'The Human Stain' is a particularly modern tragedy. The novel highlights conflicting role obligations, inadequate conceptions of freedom, and the tensions (...)
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  42. Tommie Shelby (2009). Racism, Identity, and Latinos: A Comment on Alcoff. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):129-136.
  43. Peter Singer (1978). Is Racial Discrimination Arbitrary? Philosophia 8 (2-3):185-203.
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  44. Richard Wasserstrom (1964). Rights, Human Rights, and Racial Discrimination. Journal of Philosophy 61 (20):628-641.