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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2008). W.E.B. Du Bois : Double-Consciousness, Jamesian Sympathy, and the Critical Turn. In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  2. Linda Martin Alcoff, The Political Critique of Identity.
    Political concerns about the importance of social identity are voiced equally across left, liberal, and right wing perspectives. Moreover, the suspicion of identity is not relegated to the discourse of intellectuals but is also manifest in the mainstream as a widespread public attitude, and not only among white communities.
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  3. Linda Martin Alcoff, The Political Critique of Identity.
    Political concerns about the importance of social identity are voiced equally across left, liberal, and right wing perspectives. Moreover, the suspicion of identity is not relegated to the discourse of intellectuals but is also manifest in the mainstream as a widespread public attitude, and not only among white communities.
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  4. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell. 235-262.
  5. Anita Allen, Anika Maaza Mann, Donna-Dale L. Marcano, Michele Moody-Adams & Jacqueline Scott (2008). Situated Voices: Black Women in/on the Profession of Philosophy. Hypatia 23 (2):160 - 189.
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  6. Robert M. Anthony (2012). A Challenge to Critical Understandings of Race. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (3):260-282.
    In this article, I demonstrate fundamental weaknesses in the ability of critical understandings of race to produce reliable knowledge of how social actors use social comparisons as a way to align self with ingroup. I trace these weaknesses to two sources: The first is relying on social status as an explanation for race-based assessments, ingroup motivations, and social constructions of otherness. This is opposed to leaning on assessments grounded in social psychological research that links properties of human cognition to the (...)
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  7. Anthony Appiah (1990). But Would That Still Be Me?&Quot; Notes on Gender, "Race," Ethnicity, as Sources of "Identity. Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):493-499.
  8. Yoko Arisaka, Asian Women: Invisibility, Locations, and Claims to Philosophy.
    “Asian women” is an ambiguous category; it seems to indicate a racial as well as a cultural designation. The number of articles or books on being Asian or Asian-American is on the rise in other disciplines, but in comparison to the material on black or Hispanic identities, Asians are largely missing from the field of philosophy of race. Things Asian in philosophy are generally reserved for those who study Asian philosophy or comparative philosophy, but that focus usually excludes reflections on (...)
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  9. Cathryn Bailey (2007). We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity. Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    : In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism (or the claim that ethical vegetarianism is morally right for all people) and white racism (the claim that white solipsistic and possibly white privileged ethical claims are imperialistically or insensitively universalized over less privileged human lives). This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification (or solidarity) with animals in ethical vegetarianism. (...)
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  10. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women". Hypatia 20 (3):127 - 148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  11. Lawrie Balfour (1998). &Quot;a Most Disagreeable Mirror&Quot;: Race Consciousness as Double Consciousness. Political Theory 26 (3):346-369.
  12. John Barresi, Black and White Like Me.
    John Griffi n’s classic on racism, Black Like Me (1960), provides an interesting text with which to investigate the development of a dialogical self. Griffi n becomes a black man for only a short period of time, but during that time he develops a black social identity and sense of personal identity, that contrasts radically with his former white identity. When he looks into a mirror on several occasions he engages in a dialogue with himself, as both a black and (...)
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  13. Françoise Baylis (2003). Black as Me: Narrative Identity. Developing World Bioethics 3 (2):142–150.
  14. Linda A. Bell (2007). Book Review: Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self by Linda Mart�N Alcoff. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (2):196-200.
  15. Eveline Bruijn & Gail Whiteman (2010). That Which Doesn't Break Us: Identity Work by Local Indigenous 'Stakeholders'. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):479 - 495.
    This article describes a case study on the Machiguenga, a remote Indigenous tribe affected by the Camisea Gas Project in the Peru. We introduce the anthropological concept of 'glocalization' and integrate this with organizational knowledge of 'identity work'. Our findings demonstrate that identity work is a multi-faceted and boundary spanning process that significantly affects stakeholder relations and contributes to conflict between local communities and oil and gas companies. Indigenous identity can be both threatened and strengthened in response to natural gas (...)
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  16. Anna Carastathis, Feminism and the Political Economy of Representation : Intersectionality, Invisibility and Embodiment.
    It has become commonplace within feminist theory to claim that women's lives are constructed by multiple, intersecting systems of oppression. In this thesis, l challenge the consensus that oppression is aptly captured by the theoretical model of "intersectionality." While intersectionality originates in Black feminist thought as a purposive intervention into US antidiscrimination law, it has been detached from that context and harnessed to different representational aims. For instance, it is often asserted that intersectionality enables a representational politics that overcomes legacies (...)
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  17. Jorge Gracia (2010). Identity and Philosophy. In Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia Schutte & Otávio Bueno (eds.), A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
  18. Jorge J. E. Gracia (2005). Individuality, Life Plans, and Identity: Foundational Concepts in Appiah's the Ethics of Identity. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):283–291.
  19. D. N. Havis (2009). Blackness Beyond Witness: Black Vernacular Phenomena and Auditory Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (7):747-759.
    The article posits that philosophy’s visual bias has limited exploration of the ways in which sound, and the awareness of sound, offers an alternative framework for social change. It moves from sight to sound and from visual witnessing to sound-based wit(h)ness to illustrate the implications of sound as a form of political resistance. Combining insights from the work of Michel Foucault and Emmanuel Levinas with elements of the Black Vernacular tradition, it articulates the ways in which the blues, jazz and (...)
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  20. Juliet Hooker (2009). Race and the Politics of Solidarity. OUP USA.
    Solidarity-the reciprocal relations of trust and obligation between citizens that are essential for a thriving polity-is a basic goal of all political communities. Yet it is extremely difficult to achieve, especially in multiracial societies. In an era of increasing global migration and democratization, that issue is more pressing than perhaps ever before. In the past few decades, racial diversity and the problems of justice that often accompany it have risen dramatically throughout the world. It features prominently nearly everywhere: from the (...)
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  21. James Hudson (2001). The Passionate Opposition to Hereditarianism. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (1):1–17.
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  22. Ludger Jansen (2005). Kwame Anthony Appiah, The Ethics of Identity. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 9.
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  23. Richard A. Jones (2006). Black Authenticity/Inauthenticity and American Empire. Radical Philosophy Today 2006:195-210.
    In this paper, I explore political identity for African Americans in an era where the stated aim of the U.S. is global dominance. In ordinary language, I am interested in how blacks can effectively engage in dissent, civil disobedience, protest, insurrection, and revolutionary actions while surviving in an atmosphere where the majority believe either Bush I’s “A friend of my enemy is my enemy,” or Bush II’s “If you harbor terrorists, you’re a terrorist; if you aid and abet terrorists, you’re (...)
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  24. Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley (2005). Is a Coherent Racial Identity Essential to Genuine Individuals and Communiities? Josiah Royce on Race. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (3):216-228.
  25. Ina Kerner (2007). The Ethics of Identity. By Anthony Appiah. We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity. By Tommie Shelby. [REVIEW] Constellations 14 (3):457-461.
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  26. Jozsef Kovacs (2009). Whose Identity is It Anyway? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):44 – 45.
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  27. Thomas Kuhn, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, the (Ch. 9 Only).
  28. Michael C. LaBossiere (1997). Racial Identity and Oppression. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):31-38.
  29. Emily S. Lee (2014). The Ambiguous Practices of the Inauthentic Asian American Woman. Hypatia 29 (1):146-163.
    The Asian American identity is intimately associated with upward class mobility as the model minority, yet women's earnings remain less than men's, and Asian American women are perceived to have strong family ties binding them to domestic responsibilities. As such, the exact class status of Asian American women is unclear. The immediate association of this ethnic identity with a specific class as demonstrated by the recently released Pew study that Asian Americans are “the highest-income, best-educated” ethnicity contrasts with another study (...)
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  30. Lionel K. McPherson & Tommie Shelby (2004). Blackness and Blood: Interpreting African American Identity. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (2):171–192.
  31. Josè Medina (2003). Identity Trouble: Disidentification and the Problem of Difference. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (6):655-680.
    This paper uses the conceptual apparatus of Wittgenstein’s later philosophy to tackle a foundational issue in the philosophical literature on group identity, namely, the problem of difference. This problem suggests that any appeal to a collective identity is oppressive because it imposes a shared identity on the members of a group and suppresses the internal differences of the group. I develop a Wittgensteinian view of identity that dissolves this problem by showing the conceptual confusions on which it rests. My Wittgensteinian (...)
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  32. Charles W. Mills (1998). Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race. Cornell University Press.
    Charles Mills makes visible in the world of mainstream philosophy some of the crucial issues of the black experience.
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  33. Charles W. Mills (1994). Do Black Men Have a Moral Duty to Marry Black Women? Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (s1):131-153.
  34. Daniele Monticelli (2012). Challenging Identity. Sign Systems Studies 40 (3-4):319-338.
    The concept of “cultural identity” has gradually replaced such discredited concepts as “race”, “ethnicity”, even “nationality” in the conservative political discourse of recent decades which conceives, represents and performs culture as a closed system with clear-cut boundaries which must be defended from contamination.The article employs the theories of Derrida and Lotman as useful tools for deconstructing this understanding of cultural identity, which has recently become anideological justification for socio-political conflicts. In fact, their theories spring from a thorough critique of the (...)
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  35. Lucius T. Outlaw (2009). Review of Ronald R. Sundstrom, The Browning of America and the Evasion of Social Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
  36. Lucius T. Outlaw (1996). On Race and Philosophy. Routledge.
    On Race and Philosophy is a collection of essays written and published across the last twenty years, which focus on matters of race, philosophy, and social and political life in the West, in particular in the US. These important writings trace the author's continuing efforts not only to confront racism, especially within philosophy, but, more importantly, to work out viable conceptions of raciality and ethnicity that are empirically sound while avoiding chauvinism and invidious ethnocentrism. The hope is that such conceptions (...)
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  37. Gina Philogene (1994). "African American" as a New Social Representation. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (2):89–109.
  38. Andrew J. Pierce (2012). Reconstructing Race: A Discourse-Theoretical Approach to a Normative Politics of Identity. Philosophical Forum 43 (1):27-49.
  39. Melvin L. Rogers (2010). Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):192-194.
    In Black Bodies, White Gazes, George Yancy investigates how the experiences of blacks both come into view and are simultaneously distorted by the racialized gaze of whites. In the process of distortion by whites, often unbeknownst to themselves, they are continually implicated in the oppression of blacks that reflexively reinvests "whiteness as the transcendental norm" (xxiii). Precisely because whiteness is tied to socially embedded historical power and privilege that functions on multiple levels of social life, undoing its ill effects, to (...)
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  40. Tommie Shelby (2002). Foundations of Black Solidarity: Collective Identity or Common Oppression? Ethics 112 (2):231-266.
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  41. George W. Stickel (2009). Pragmatism, Nation, and Race. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):19-22.
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  42. Anna Stubblefield (1995). Racial Identity and Non-Essentialism About Race. Social Theory and Practice 21 (3):341-368.
  43. Ronald R. Sundstrom (2003). Arrogance, Love, and Identity in the American Struggle with Race. Social Theory and Practice 29 (1):159-172.
  44. Ronald Robles Sundstrom (2012). In The Shadow of Du Bois: Afro-Modern Political Thought in America by Robert Gooding-Williams. Constellations 19 (1):139-145.
  45. Paul C. Taylor (2004). Silence and Sympathy: Dewey's Whiteness. In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
  46. Joris van Gorkom (2008). Immanuel Kant on Racial Identity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (1):1-10.
    Immanuel Kant enshrined the modem notion of race. Many commentators prefer to ignore this aspect of Kant’s thinking, considering it to be out-dated, merely a remnant of eighteenth century philosophy or bad science. This article will examine Kant’s racial theory within the context of his wider work, and mainly so with regard to the teleological principle. Kant often presents his new notion of race and racial differences in relation to teleology, i.e., he used races as an example for understanding the (...)
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  47. Kathryn Walker (2012). Resolving Debates Over the Status of Ethnic Identities During Transitional Justice. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (1):68.
  48. George Yancy (ed.) (2004). What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
    In the burgeoning field of whiteness studies, What White Looks Like takes a unique approach to the subject by collecting the ideas of African-American philosophers. George Yancy has brought together a group of thinkers who address the problematic issues of whiteness as a category requiring serious analysis. What does white look like when viewed through philosophical training and African-American experience? In this volume, Robert Birt asks if whites can "live whiteness authentically." Janine Jones examines what it means to be a (...)
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  49. NaomiZack Zack (2003). Reparations and the Rectification of Race. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):139-151.
    Positive law and problems with identifyingbeneficiaries confine reparations for U.S.slavery to the level of discourse. Within thediscourse, the broader topic of rectificationcan be addressed. The rectification of slaveryincludes restoring full humanity to our ideasof the slaves and their descendants and itrequires disabuse of the false biological ideaof race. This is not racial eliminativism,because biological race never existed, but moreimportantly because African American racialidentities and redress of present racism arebased on lifeworlds of race in contrast withwhich the biological idea has been (...)
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Mixed Race
  1. Linda Martin Alcoff, Latinos and the Categories of Race.
    Apparently, Latinos are “taking over.” 1 With news that Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States, the public airwaves are filled with concerned voices about the impact that a non-English dominant, Catholic, non-white, largely poor population will have on “American” identity. Aside from the hysteria, Latino identity poses some authentically new questions for the standard way in which minority identities are conceptualized. Are Latinos a race, an ethnicity, or some combination? What does it mean to have (...)
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