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  1. Alia Al-Saji (2010). The Racialization of Muslim Veils: A Philosophical Analysis. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (8):875-902.
    This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images. I examine the public debate leading to the 2004 French law banning conspicuous religious signs in schools and French colonial attitudes to veiling in Algeria, in conjunction with discourses on the veil that have arisen in other western contexts. My argument is that western perceptions and representations of veiled Muslim women are not simply about Muslim women themselves. Rather than representing Muslim women, these (...)
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  2. Linda Martin Alcoff, Comparative Race, Comparative Racisms (2007).
  3. Linda Martín Alcoff (2005). Latino Oppression. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):536–545.
  4. Kevin Scott Amidon (2007). Carrie Chapman Catt and the Evolutionary Politics of Sex and Race, 1885-1940. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (2):305-328.
  5. Ido Amihai, Leon Deouell & Shlomo Bentin (2011). Conscious Awareness is Necessary for Processing Race and Gender Information From Faces. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):269-279.
    Previous studies suggested that emotions can be correctly interpreted from facial expressions in the absence of conscious awareness of the face. Our goal was to explore whether subordinate information about a face’s gender and race could also become available without awareness of the face. Participants classified the race or the gender of unfamiliar faces that were ambiguous with regard to these dimensions. The ambiguous faces were preceded by face-images that unequivocally represented gender and race, rendered consciously invisible by simultaneous continuous-flash-suppression. (...)
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  6. Alison Bailey and, Taking Responsibility for Community Violence.
    This article examines the responses of two communities to hate crimes in their cities. In particular it explores how community understandings of responsibility shape collective responses to hate crimes. I use the case of Bridesberg, Pennsylvania to explore how anti-racist work is restricted by backward-looking conceptions of moral responsibility (e.g. being responsible). Using recent writings in feminist ethics.(1) I argue for a forward-looking notion that advocates an active view: taking responsibility for attitudes and behaviors that foster climates in which hate (...)
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  7. M. Andreae (2004). Prenatal Sex and Race Determination is a Slippery Slope. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):376-376.
    I am deeply worried about your guest editorial,1 please allow me a few bullet points: Trying to dispel some of the counterarguments to sex selection, your argument of prospective parents’ autonomy is void. If anyone has a right to determine his or her sex, it would be the person concerned, in this case the unborn child. ….
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  8. Adriana Ayers (2011). The Evolution of Kotex Advertising and the Introduction of the 'Negro Market'. Constellations 2 (2):52-65.
    Adriana Ayers studies the evolution of kotex advertising, focusing specifically on the way in which African American women were figured into changing advertisers’ conceptions of womanhood. The article analyzes images featured in various women’s magazines to examine how ideas surrounding menstruation were packaged and sold to women.
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  9. Alison Bailey (1998). Privilege: Expanding on Marilyn Frye's Oppression. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):104-119.
    This essay serves as both a response and embellishment of Marilyn Frye's now classic essay " Oppression." It is meant to pick up where this essay left off and to make connections between oppression, as Frye defines it, and the privileges that result from institutional structures. This essay tries to clarify one meaning of privilege that is lost in philosophical discussions of injustice. I develop a distinction between unearned privileges and earned advantages. Clarifying the meaning of privilege as unearned structural (...)
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  10. Mary L. Bellhouse (2006). Candide Shoots the Monkey Lovers: Representing Black Men in Eighteenth-Century French Visual Culture. Political Theory 34 (6):741 - 784.
  11. Mary K. Bloodsworth (1999). Embodiment and Ambiguity: Luce Irigaray, Sexual Difference, and Race. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):69-90.
  12. Lisa Guenther (2012). Fecundity and Natal Alienation: Rethinking Kinship with Emmanuel Levinas and Orlando Patterson. Levinas Studies 7 (1):1-19.
    In his 1934 essay, “Reflections on the Philosophy of Hitlerism,” Levinas raises important questions about the subject’s relation to nature and to history. His account of the ethical significance of paternity, maternity, and fraternity in texts such as Totality and Infinity and Otherwise Than Being suggest powerful new ways to understand the meaning of kinship, beyond the abstractions of Western liberalism. How does this analysis of race and kinship translate into the context of the Transatlantic slave trade, which not only (...)
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  13. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2005). Humor, Context, and Divided Cognition. Social Theory and Practice 31 (3):309-36.
    Those who suggest that only a sexist (or racist, or anti-semite) can experience amusement at a sexist (or racist, or anti-semitic) joke have failed to grasp two underappreciated features of the psychology of humor: (1) that amusement is sensitive to what is conveyed to the audience by the contexts within which a joke is taken to be situated, and hence to pragmatic, and not merely semantic, factors; and (2) that, given the non-integrated nature of the ordinary human cognitive system, the (...)
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  14. Nabina Liebow (2016). Internalized Oppression and Its Varied Moral Harms: Self‐Perceptions of Reduced Agency and Criminality. Hypatia 31 (3).
    The dominant view in the philosophical literature contends that internalized oppression, especially that experienced in virtue of one's womanhood, reduces one's sense of agency. Here, I extend these arguments and suggest a more nuanced account. In particular, I argue that internalized oppression can cause a person to conceive of herself as a deviant agent as well as a reduced one. This self-conception is also damaging to one's moral identity and creates challenges that are not captured by merely analyzing a reduced (...)
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  15. Jennifer Marra (2015). Humor as a Symbolic Form: Cassirer and the Culture of Comedy. In Sebastian Luft & J. Tyler Friedman (eds.), The Philosophy of Ernst Cassirer: A Novel Assessment. De Gruyter 419-434.
  16. Bence Nanay (2010). Three Ways of Resisting Racism. The Monist 93 (2):255-280.
    Two widespread strategies of resisting racism are the following. The first one is to deny the existence of races and thus block even the possibility of racist claims. The second one is to grant that races exist but insist that racial differences do not imply value differences. The aim of this paper is to outline a strategy of resisting racism that is weaker than the first but stronger than the second strategy: even if we accept that races exist, we can (...)
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  17. Gail M. Presbey (1990). Racism and Sexism. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 2 (2):29-32.
  18. Monique Whitaker (2015). Updating Syllabi, Reimagining Assignments, and Embracing Error: Strategies for Retaining Marginalized Students in Philosophy. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 1 (Practices in Pedagogy):3–16.
    One of the significant problems for philosophy’s development into a more diverse discipline is the familiar sharp reduction in the proportion of women and students of color after initial, introductory-level courses. This contributes to a lack in the breadth of perspective and experience that both upper-level students and faculty bring to philosophy, which in turn undermines the strength of the discipline as a whole. Much of the transformation of philosophy must necessarily happen at the departmental, and even university, level; but (...)
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