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Summary Ralph Waldo Emerson was a nineteenth century American literary philosopher and the chief figure of the New England Renaissance. His work reflects earlier Anglo-American and European traditions of thought and was a significant influence on subsequent developments in American philosophy and American culture generally--where he and his writings are deeply rooted. 
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  1. Steven G. Affeldt (2004). Review of David Mikics, The Romance of Individualism in Emerson and Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (9).
    All students of Nietzsche know of his profound admiration for Emerson’s writing. However, as Stanley Cavell has observed, this knowledge has mostly been repressed or ineffective; which is to say that the extent, depth, and specificity of Emerson’s influence upon Nietzsche has remained largely unacknowledged and unassessed. In the course of the past decade or so, owing in large part to the influence of Cavell’s own work on Emerson (and Nietzsche), this situation has begun to change. Emerson’s work has increasingly (...)
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  2. Steven G. Affeldt (2003). Review of Richard Eldridge (Ed.), Stanley Cavell. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (11).
    Including the substantial Introduction by Richard Eldridge, this volume consists of nine previously unpublished essays each of which focuses upon a single region of Cavell’s work. While the scope of the issues considered in the volume can be only incompletely indicated by listing the regions addressed, they include: ethics, philosophy of action, the normativity of language, aesthetics and modernism, American philosophy, Shakespeare, film, television, and opera, and the relation of Cavell’s work to German philosophy and Romanticism. The volume also contains (...)
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  3. Thomas Augst (1999). Composing the Moral Senses: Emerson and the Politics of Character in Nineteenth-Century America. Political Theory 27 (1):85-120.
    This paper concerns the character of Emerson's philosophy and his ethical thought in its relationship to nineteenth-century politics.
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  4. Charles M. Bakewell (1903). The Philosophy of Emerson. Philosophical Review 12 (5):525-536.
    This paper concerns the character of Emerson's philosophy, and his general attitude toward life, in relationship to the human tendency to become isolated or compartmentalized, in view and attitude, by the specifics of work, career and particular perspectives.
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  5. Stephen Barnes (2007). The Conduct of Life. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 35 (106):37-38.
    Here H.G. Callaway offers us a new reading edition of the oft-cited, commonly-studies, and widely-enjoyed Emerson text The Conduct of Life. This edition provides an introduction by Callaway, annotations throughout, a chronology, a bibliography, and index, and modern spellings throughout. And it does its job well.
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  6. James Bell (2007). Absolve You to Yourself: Emerson's Conception of Rational Agency. Inquiry 50 (3):234 – 252.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson famously warned his readers against the dangers of conformity and consistency. In this paper, I argue that this warning informs his engagement with and opposition to a Kantian view of rational agency. The interpretation I provide of some of Emerson's central essays outlines a unique conception of agency, a conception which gives substance to Emerson's exhortations of self-trust. While Kantian in spirit, Emerson's view challenges the requirement that autonomy requires acting from a conception of the law. The (...)
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  7. Joseph L. Blau (1977). Emerson's Transcendentalist Individualism as a Social Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 31 (1):80 - 92.
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  8. Vince Brewton, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In his lifetime, Ralph Waldo Emerson became the most widely known man of letters in America, establishing himself as a prolific poet, essayist, popular lecturer, and an advocate of social reforms who was nevertheless suspicious of reform and reformers. Emerson achieved some reputation with his verse, corresponded with many of the leading intellectual and artistic figures of his day, and during an off and on again career as a Unitarian minister, delivered and later published a number of controversial sermons. Emerson’s (...)
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  9. Percy W. Brown (1957). Emerson's Philosophy of Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 15 (3):350-354.
    As this writer reads him, Emerson's thinking falls into three loose and broad categories. He held soul to be divine, that intuition or divine spark within every man, whereby every man is capable of infinite growth. He regarded Nature as the lengthened shadow of God cast upon human sense, a kind of incarnation of some Divine Power here on earth. And he believed Deity ever near to man, and every soul possessed of access to Deity, not continuously, but at least (...)
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  10. H. G. Callaway (2010). Memories and Portraits, Explorations in American Thought. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    In Memories and Portraits: Explorations in American Thought, H. G. Callaway embeds his distinctive contextualism and philosophical pluralism within strands of history and autobiography, spanning three continents. Starting in Philadelphia, and reflecting on the meaning of home in American thought, he offers a philosophically inspired narrative of travel and explorations, in Europe and Africa, illuminating central elements of American thought—partly out of diverse foreign and domestic reactions and fascinating cultural contrasts. -/- This book is of interest for the contemporary interplay (...)
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  11. H. G. Callaway (2009). Review of D.W. Howe, What Hath God Wrought. [REVIEW] History News Network, Online 2009.
    This is my review of D.W. Howe's 2007 book, What Hath God Wrought, Transformation of America 1815-1848. The book is a volume in the new Oxford History of the U.S.(O.U.P. 2007)--exploring the transformation of the early American republic through the period of domination of the Jacksonian Democrats. This is also the period of the New England Renaissance and the early work of R.W. Emerson. Howe devotes a good deal of attention to Emerson and his influence and thereby provides needed historical (...)
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  12. H. G. Callaway (2008). Emerson and the Law of Freedom. In , R.W. Emerson, Society and Solitude: Twelve Chapters. Mellon Press.
    This paper is the expository and evaluative introduction to my new edition of Emerson's Society and Solitude, Twelve Chapters.
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  13. H. G. Callaway (2008). R.W. Emerson, Society and Solitude, Twelve Chapters. Edwin Mellen Press.
    This new edition of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Society and Solitude reproduces the original 1870 edition—only updating nineteenth-century prose spellings. Emerson’s text is fully annotated to identify the authors and issues of concern in the twelve essays, and definitions are provided for selected words in Emerson’s impressive vocabulary. The work aims to facilitate a better understanding of Emerson’s late philosophy in relation to his sources, his development and his subsequent influence.
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  14. H. G. Callaway (2007). Emerson and Santayana on Imagination. In Flamm And Skowronski (ed.), Under Any Sky, Contemporary Readings on George Santayana.
    This paper examines Santayana on imagination, and related themes, chiefly as these are expressed in his early work, Interpretations of Poetry and Religion (1900). My hypothesis is that Santayana under-estimates, in this book, the force and significance of the prevalent distinction between imagination and fancy, as this was originally put forward by Coleridge and later developed in Emerson’s late essays. I will focus on some of those aspects of Santayana’s book which appear to react to or to engage with Emerson’s (...)
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  15. H. G. Callaway (2006). Emerson on Creativity in Thought and Action. In , R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading.
    The opening essay of Emerson’s 1860 book, The Conduct of Life, posed, in that fateful year of threatening Civil War and disunion, the philosophical problem of human freedom and fate. The essay “Fate” is followed in the present book by a series of essays on related themes, including: “Power,” “Wealth,” “Culture,” “Worship,” “Beauty” and “Illusions.” The central question of the volume is, “How shall I live?” Appreciating both our freedom and its limits, we understand the vitality of power to acquire (...)
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  16. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2006). R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading. University Press of America.
    My new edition of Emerson's Conduct, modernizes the prose spelling, annotates the text and adds a short chronology, a bibliography foused on Emerson's sources, a new Introduction, and a comprehensive index. Available in HB and PB.
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  17. H. G. Callaway (1999). Review of Mott, W.T and R.E. Burkholder Eds., Emersonian Circles, Essays in Honor of Joel Myerson. [REVIEW] Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society 35 (3):629-632.
    The 14 essays assembled in this volume, along with their intensive scholarship, create somewhat the impression of a Who's Who of contemporary literary studies of Ralph Waldo Emerson and the American Transcendentalists. All has been brought together by Mott and Burkholder to honor Joel Myerson, with the words of Emerson's famous remark to Walt Whitman, "We greet You at the Mid-point of a Great Career" (p. xi). An authority on Transcendentalism, textual and bibliographical studies, Myerson has written, edited, or co-edited (...)
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  18. Stanley Cavell (2003). Old and New in Emerson and Nietzsche. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (3):53-62.
    This paper concerns the interpretation of Nietzsche and his readings of R.W. Emerson.
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  19. Stanley Cavell (1995). Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, Derrida. Blackwell.
    Introduction Cavell's Voices and Derrida's Grammatology The stature of Stanley Cavell is increasingly considered unique among living American philosophers ...
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  20. Stanley Cavell (1989/2013). This New yet Unapproachable America: Lectures After Emerson After Wittgenstein. Living Batch Press.
  21. Stanley Cavell (1988). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome: The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism: The Carus Lectures, 1988. University Of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two ...
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  22. Stanley Cavell (1988). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism: The Carus Lectures, 1988. University of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two traditions of English and German philosophy shun one another; where the cultures of America and Europe unsettle one another.
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  23. Stanley Cavell (1988). In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism. University of Chicago Press.
    These lectures by one of the most influential and original philosophers of the twentieth century constitute a sustained argument for the philosophical basis of romanticism, particularly in its American rendering. Through his examination of such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Wordsworth, and Coleridge, Stanley Cavell shows that romanticism and American transcendentalism represent a serious philosophical response to the challenge of skepticism that underlies the writings of Wittgenstein and Austin on ordinary language.
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  24. Vincent Colapietro (2004). The Question of Voice and the Limits of Pragmatism: Emerson, Dewey, and Cavell. Metaphilosophy 35 (1-2):178-201.
    One criticism of pragmatism, forcefully articulated by Stanley Cavell, is that pragmatism fails to deal with mourning, understood in the psychoanalytic sense as grief-work (Trauerarbeit). Such work would seemingly be as pertinent to philosophical investigations (especially ones conducted by pragmatists) as to psychoanalytic explorations. Finding such themes as mourning and loss in R. W. Emerson's writings, Cavell warns against assimilating Emerson's voice to that of American pragmatism, especially Dewey's instrumentalism, for such assimilation risks the loss or repression of Emerson's voice (...)
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  25. Frank M. Coleman (2010). Classical Liberalism and American Landscape Representation: The Imperial Self in Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):75 – 96.
    Here it is shown that 'vacant nature' is deployed as sign in Anglo-American landscape representation of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries to support a Cartesian imaginary of spatial extension. The referent of this imaginary is variously denoted as 'America' (John Locke), the 'north west' (Jefferson), the 'wilderness' (Ralph Waldo Emerson), and the 'frontier' (Frederick Jackson Turner) but throughout it is essentially the same 'vacant' landscape; its function is to produce a site and space of appearance for an imperial self, an (...)
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  26. Thomas Cooper & Tom Kelleher (2001). Better Mousetrap? Of Emerson, Ethics, and Postmillennium Persuasion. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (2 & 3):176 – 192.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson reputedly said, "If you build a better mouse trap, the world will beat a path to your door." In this article, Emerson's actual quote is seen to infer a simple rule: quality supply attracts quantity demand. Such a rule could imply that enitre businesses related to persuasion, such as public relations, advertising, and marketing seem at best unnecessary and at worst unethical. However, Emerson's logic may not apply in modern market places driven by multiple competing images. This (...)
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  27. John Michael Corrigan (2010). The Metempsychotic Mind: Emerson and Consciousness. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (3):433-455.
    This article argues that Ralph Waldo Emerson employs metempsychosis (reincarnation or the transmigration of the soul into successive bodies) as a figurative template for human consciousness. Mapping various traditions from Hinduism, Pythagoreanism, Platonism, and Neoplatonism onto the vastness of the geological and biological records, Emerson translates metaphysics for modernity: he depicts the soul's journey through the chronological sequence of history as a poetic process that culminates in a tenuous form of self-knowledge.
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  28. William Day (2001). Gustaaf Van Cromphout, Emerson's Ethics:Emerson's Ethics. Ethics 111 (4):830-832.
  29. John Dewey (1903). Emerson-the Philosopher of Democracy. International Journal of Ethics 13 (4):405-413.
    This article is John Dewey's contribution to the Emerson celebrations of 1903. Reprinted in John Dewey, The Middle Works, Vol. 3, pp. 184-192.
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  30. Jeffrey R. Di Leo (1994). American Transcendentalism and Asian Religions. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 22 (68):21-24.
    This is Jeffrey R. Di Leo's review of Arthur Verslius's 1993 book, American Transcendentalism and Asian Religion.
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  31. Susan Dunston (2010). Philosophy and Personal Loss. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):158-170.
    Two years after the death of his small son, Ralph Waldo Emerson famously wrote of the experience, "I cannot get it nearer to me" (CW 3:29). Most readers have been troubled by this remark, reading it as a sign that Emerson's relationship to grief and even to his son was disturbingly oblique, and the predominant response has been that it demonstrates he was detached, cold, and disconnected in the service of his transcendental philosophy.1 Such a response is grounded in the (...)
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  32. Ralph Waldo Emerson (various). Brahma. In Various (ed.), Emerson Poems.
    This short poem is an Emersonian interpretation of the Hindu concept.
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  33. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays and Poetry.
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  34. Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Method of Nature.
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  35. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Man the Reformer.
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  36. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1966). Emerson on Education. New York, Teachers College Press, Teachers College, Columbia University.
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  37. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1909). Essays and English Traits. NEW YORK: P.F. COLLIER & SON COMPANY, 1909–14 NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2001.
    The American Scholar An Address, Man the Reformer, Self-Reliance, Compensation, Friendship, Heroism, The Over-Soul, Circles, The Poet, Character, Manners, Essays: Gifts, Nature, Politics, New England Reformers Worship, Beauty -/- English Traits -/- (Harvard Classics, Vol. V.).
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  38. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1884). The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol. I. unknown.
    This is an important book historically, documenting the long friendship and correspondence of Emerson and Carlyle. It should be noted that there is a more up-to-date edition, done in the 20th century (edited by Joseph Slater, Columbia U.P. 1964). Many of the common themes and interests of the two thinkers are indicated in the correspondence, and often enough, one can also see evidence of the differences and how they approached them.
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  39. Ralph Waldo Emerson (ed.) (1860). The Conduct of Life. Ticknor and Fields.
    This work is Emerson's set of essays published in 1860 just before the start of the Civil War: 'Fate,' 'Power,' 'Wealth,' 'Culture,' 'Behavior,' 'Worship,' 'Considerations by the Way,' 'Beauty,' 'Illusions.'.
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  40. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1856). English Traits. Phillips, Sampson.
    This book is Emerson's portrait of the England and the English.
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  41. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1849). Nature, Addresses, Lectures. James Munroe.
    This book includes Emerson's re-written version of his early book, Nature, along with various essays, including: The American Scholar (1836), The Divinity School Address (1838), Literary Ethics (1838), The Method of Nature (1841), Man the Reformer (1841), Lecture on the Times (1841), The Conservative (1841), The Transcendentalist (1842), The Young American (1844).
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  42. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1849). Nature: Addresses and Lectures. James Munroe.
    This is an electronic text of the second edition of Emerson's Nature, published as originally in 1849 with a collection of addresses and lectures.
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  43. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1844). Essays, Second Series. James Munroe & Co..
    This is Emerson's Second Series of Essays, including: The Poet, Experience, Character, Manners, Gifts, Nature, Politics, Nominalist and Realist, and New England Reformers.
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  44. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1841). Essays: First Series. Ticknor and Fields.
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  45. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1838). Divinity School Address. In Bode And Cowley (ed.), Reprinted in Bode and Cowley, The Portable Emerson.
    This is R.W. Emerson's address to the students and faculty of the Harvard Divinity School in the year 1838.
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  46. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1836). Nature. J. Munroe.
    Emerson's first book published in 1836, and including the following: Introduction, Nature, Commodity, Beauty, Language, Discipline, Idealism, Spirit, Prospects.
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  47. Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Transcendentalist.
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  48. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Politics (1844).
    Gold and iron are good To buy iron and gold; All earth’s fleece and food For their like are sold. Boded Merlin wise, Proved Napoleon great, Nor kind nor coinage buys Aught above its rate. Fear, Craft, and Avarice Cannot rear a State. Out of dust to build What is more than dust, Walls Amphion piled Phoebus stablish must. When the Muses nine With the Virtues meet, Find to their design An Atlantic seat, By green orchard boughs Fended from the (...)
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  49. Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Young American.
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  50. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Poems: Household Edition.
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