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Siblings:History/traditions: Rape
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  1. Don Adams (2000). Can Pornography Cause Rape? Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (1):1–43.
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  2. Jami L. Anderson (2009). Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison. In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
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  3. Scott A. Anderson (2005). Sex Under Pressure: Jerks, Boorish Behavior, and Gender Hierarchy. [REVIEW] Res Publica 11 (4):349-369.
    Pressuring someone into having sex would seem to differ in significant ways from pressuring someone into investing in one’s business or buying an expensive bauble. In affirming this claim, I take issue with a recent essay by Sarah Conly (‘Seduction, Rape, and Coercion’, Ethics, October 2004), who thinks that pressuring into sex can be helpfully evaluated by analogy to these other instances of using pressure. Drawing upon work by Alan Wertheimer, the leading theorist of coercion, she argues that so long (...)
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  4. David Archard (2007). Is It Rape? On Acquaintance Rape and Taking Women's Consent Seriously - by Joan McGregor, Making Sense of Sexual Consent - by Mark Cowling & Paul Reynolds, the Logic of Consent, the Diversity and Deceptiveness of Consent as a Defence to Criminal Conduct - by Peter Westen, and Consent to Sexual Relations - by Lan Wertheimer. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):209–221.
  5. David Archard (2007). The Wrong of Rape. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):374–393.
    If rape is evaluated as a serious wrong, can it also be defined as non-consensual sex (NCS)? Many do not see all instances of NCS as seriously wrongful. I argue that rape is both properly defined as NCS and properly evaluated as a serious wrong. First, I distinguish the hurtfulness of rape from its wrongfulness; secondly, I classify its harms and characterize its essential wrongfulness; thirdly, I criticize a view of rape as merely ‘sex minus consent’; fourthly, I criticize mistaken (...)
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  6. Mary E. Becker (1989). Book Review:Real Rape. Susan Estrich. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (2):443-.
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  7. Vivian Berger (1988). Review Essay/Not so Simple Rape. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (1):69-81.
    Susan Estrich, Real Rape Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1987, 160 pp.
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  8. Debra Bergoffen (2011). Exploiting the Dignity of the Vulnerable Body: Rape as a Weapon of War. Philosophical Papers 38 (3):307-325.
    When the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia convicted the Bosnian Serb soldiers who used rape as a weapon of war of violating the human right to sexual self determination and of crimes against humanity, it transformed vulnerability from a mark of feminine weakness to a shared human condition. The court's judgment directs us to note the ways in which the exploitation of our bodied vulnerability is an assault on our dignity. It alerts us to the ways in which (...)
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  9. Debra B. Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    : On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  10. Keith Burgess-Jackson (2000). A Crime Against Women: Calhoun on the Wrongness of Rape. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (3):286–293.
  11. Keith Burgess-Jackson (ed.) (1999). A Most Detestable Crime: New Philosophical Essays on Rape. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays by leading philosophers probes the philosophical aspects of rape in all of its manifestations: act, crime, practice, and institution. Among the issues examined are the nature of rape; the wrongfulness and harmfulness of rape; the relation of rape to racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of oppression; and the legitimacy of various rape-law doctrines. Each contributor advances a novel argument and seeks to disentangle the conceptual, evaluative, and empirical issues that arise in connection with the (...)
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  12. Ann J. Cahill (2000). Foucault, Rape, and the Construction of the Feminine Body. Hypatia 15 (1):43-63.
    : In 1977, Michel Foucault suggested that legal approaches to rape define it as merely an act of violence, not of sexuality, and therefore not distinct from other types of assaults. I argue that rape can not be considered merely an act of violence because it is instrumental in the construction of the distinctly feminine body. Insofar as the threat of rape is ineluctably, although not determinately, associated with the development of feminine bodily comportment, rape itself holds a host of (...)
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  13. Laurie Calhoun (1997). On Rape: A Crime Against Humanity. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (1):101-109.
  14. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2009). Cultural Memory, Empathy, and Rape. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):25-42.
    Assuming a relational understanding of the self, I argue that empathy is necessary for individual and cultural recovery from rape. However, gender affects our ability to listen with empathy to rape survivors. For women, the existence of cultural memories discourages empathy either by engendering fear of their own future rape or by provoking sympathy rather than empathy. For men, the lack of cultural memories makes rape what Arendt calls an "unreality," thus diminishing the possibility for empathy. Although empathetic listeningpresents gender (...)
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  15. Claudia Card (2008). The Paradox of Genocidal Rape Aimed at Enforced Pregnancy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):176-189.
  16. Claudia Card (2002). The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. Oxford University Press.
    What distinguishes evils from ordinary wrongs? Is hatred a necessarily evil? Are some evils unforgivable? Are there evils we should tolerate? What can make evils hard to recognize? Are evils inevitable? How can we best respond to and live with evils? Claudia Card offers a secular theory of evil that responds to these questions and more. Evils, according to her theory, have two fundamental components. One component is reasonably foreseeable intolerable harm -- harm that makes a life indecent and impossible (...)
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  17. Claudia Card (1997). Addendum to "Rape as a Weapon of War". Hypatia 12 (2):216 - 218.
    Learning about martial sex crimes against men has made me rethink some of my ideas about rape as a weapon of war and how to respond to it. Such crimes can be as racist as they are sexist and, in the case of male victims, may be quite simply racist.
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  18. C. Carey (1995). Rape and Adultery in Athenian Law. Classical Quarterly 45 (02):407-.
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  19. Diana Fritz Cates (2010). Experiential Narratives of Rape and Torture. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):43-66.
    Many Guatemalan women suffered extreme sexual violence during the latter half of the twentieth century. Learning of this violence can evoke hatred in persons who love and respect women—hatred for the men who perpetrated the violence and also for other men around the world who victimize women in this way. Hatred is a common response to a perceived evil, and it might in some cases be a fitting response, but it is important to subject one's emotions to critical moral reflection. (...)
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  20. Lorraine Code (2011). A New Epistemology of Rape? Philosophical Papers 38 (3):327-345.
    In this essay I take issue with entrenched conceptions of individual autonomy for how they block understandings of the implications of rape in patriarchal cultures both 'at home' and in situations of armed conflict. I focus on human vulnerability as it manifests in sedimented assumptions about violence against women as endemic to male-female relations, thwarting possibilities of knowing the specific harms particular acts of rape enact well enough to render intelligible their far-reaching social-political-moral implications. Taking my point of departure from (...)
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  21. Sarah Conly (2004). Seduction, Rape, and Coercion. Ethics 115 (1):96-121.
    In Tess of the d’Urbervilles, the innocent Tess is the object of Alec d’Urberville’s dishonorable intentions. Alec uses every wile he can think of to seduce the poor and ignorant Tess, who works keeping hens in his mother’s house: he flatters her, he impresses her with a show of wealth, he gives help to her family to win her gratitude, and he reacts with irritation and indignation when she nonetheless continues to repulse his advances, causing her to feel shame at (...)
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  22. Ann E. Cudd (2008). Comments: Rape and Enforced Pregnancy as Femicide. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (Supplement):190-199.
  23. Ann E. Cudd (2008). Rape and Enforced Pregnancy as Femicide: Comments on Claudia Card's “The Paradox of Genocidal Rape Aimed at Enforced Pregnancy”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):190-199.
  24. Ann E. Cudd (1990). Enforced Pregnancy, Rape, and the Image of Woman. Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):47 - 59.
  25. E. M. Curley (1976). Excusing Rape. Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (4):325-360.
  26. C. D. & K. Haely (1999). Rape and the Reasonable Man. Law and Philosophy 18 (2):113-139.
    Standards of reasonability play an important role in some of the most difficult cases of rape. In recent years, the notion of the ``reasonable person'' has supplanted the historical concept of the ``reasonable man'' as the test of reasonability. Contemporary feminist critics like Catharine MacKinnon and Kim Lane Scheppele have challenged the notion of the reasonable person on the grounds that reasonability standards are ``gendered to the ground'' and so, in practice, the reasonable person is just the reasonable man in (...)
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  27. E. M. Dadlez, William L. Andrews, Courtney Lewis & Marissa Stroud (2009). Rape, Evolution, and Pseudoscience: Natural Selection in the Academy. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):75-96.
  28. James Davidson (2000). Reassuring the Patriarchy A. O. Koloski-Ostrow, C. L. Lyons (Edd.): Naked Truths: Women, Sexuality and Gender in Classical Art and Archaeology . Pp. XV + 315. London: Routledge 1997. Cased, £50. Isbn: 0-415-15995-4. D. Larmour, P. Miller, C. Platter (Edd.): Rethinking Sexuality: Foucault and Classical Antiquity . Pp. 258. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998. Paper, $18.95. Isbn: 0-691-01679-8. S. Deacy, K. F. Pierce (Edd.): Rape in Antiquity: Sexual Violence in the Greek and Roman Worlds . Pp. X + 274. London: Gerald Duckworth and Co. (With the Classical Press of Wales), 1997. Cased, £40. Isbn: 0-7156-2754-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):532-.
  29. Michael Davis (1984). Setting Penalties: What Does Rape Deserve? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (1):61 - 110.
    The paper is an application of the principle of just deserts (that is, retribution) to the setting of statutory penalties. The conclusion is that there should be no separate penalty for rape but that rape should be punished under the ordinary battery statutes. The argument has four parts. First, there is a description of the place of rape in a typical statutory scheme. Second, there is a consideration of possible justifications for giving rape the status it has in such a (...)
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  30. Michael Dewar (2000). D. R. Slavitt: Broken Columns. Two Roman Epic Fragments : The Achilleid of Publius Papinius Statius and The Rape of Proserpine of Claudius Claudianus . Pp. Xi + 98. Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press, 1998. Cased, £36.50 (Paper, £13.95). ISBN: 0-8122-3424-3 (0-8122-1630-X Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):302-.
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  31. Michael Dillon (2008). Security, Race and War. In Michael Dillon & Andrew W. Neal (eds.), Foucault on Politics, Security and War. Palgrave Macmillan.
  32. Louise du Toit (2011). Introduction: Meaning/s of Rape in War and Peace. Philosophical Papers 38 (3):285-305.
  33. Louise Du Toit (2009). A Philosophical Investigation of Rape: The Making and Unmaking of the Feminine Self. Routledge.
    This book offers a critical feminist perspective on the widely debated topic of transitional justice and forgiveness. Louise Du Toit examines the phenomenon of rape with a feminist philosophical discourse concerning women’s or ‘feminine’ subjectivity and selfhood. She demonstrates how the hierarchical dichotomy of male active versus female passive sexuality – which obscures the true nature of rape – is embedded in the dominant western symbolic frame. Through a Hegelian and phenomenological reading of first-person accounts by rape victims, she excavates (...)
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  34. R. A. Duff (2001). A Most Detestable Crime: New Philosophical Essays on Rape. Keith Burgess-Jackson. Mind 110 (439):729-732.
  35. Jane Duran (2000). Rape as a Form of Torture. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):191-196.
    Using material taken from contemporary feminist theory and also from work on human rights, it is argued that rape is a form of torture, and that it operates on powerful levels, both literally and metaphorically. Part of the argument is that rape has achieved the status it has as political force for exploitation because of strong beliefs about cultural reproduction and about the roles that women play in cultural reproduction.
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  36. A. W. Eaton (2003). Where Ethics and Aesthetics Meet: Titian's Rape of Europa. Hypatia 18 (4):159 - 188.
    Titian's Rape of Europa is highly praised for its luminous colors and sensual textures. But the painting has an overlooked dark side, namely that it eroticizes rape. I argue that this is an ethical defect that diminishes the painting aesthetically. This argument-that an artwork can be worse off qua work of art precisely because it is somehow ethically problematic-demonstrates that feminist concerns about art can play a legitimate role in art criticism and aesthetic appreciation.
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  37. Dorothy Einon (2002). More an Ideologically Driven Sermon Than Science – a Review of Randy Thornhill and Craig T. Palmer, a Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):445-456.
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  38. Nick Fisher (2005). Sex Offenders R. Omitowoju: Rape and the Politics of Consent in Classical Athens . Pp. Viii + 249. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Cased, £45, US$60. ISBN: 0-521-80074-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):582-.
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  39. Paul Formosa (2008). The Problems with Evil. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (4):395-415.
    The concept of evil has been an unpopular one in many recent Western political and ethical discourses. One way to justify this neglect is by pointing to the many problemswiththe concept of evil. The standard grievances brought against the very concept of evil include: that it has no proper place in secular political and ethical discourses; that it is a demonizing term of hatred that leads to violence; that it is necessarily linked with outdated notions of body and sexuality; and (...)
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  40. Alfred H. Fuchs (forthcoming). Foucault, Rape, and the Construction of the Feminine Body. Hypatia.
  41. Rachel Hall (2004). "It Can Happen to You:" Rape Prevention in the Age of Risk Management. Hypatia 19 (3):1-19.
    : This essay provides a critical analysis of rape prevention since the 1980s. I argue that we must challenge rape prevention's habitual reinforcement of the notion that fear is a woman's best line of defense. I suggest changes that must be made in the anti-rape movement if we are to move past fear. Ultimately, I raise the question of what, if not vague threats and scare tactics, constitutes prevention.
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  42. E. Harris (1996). Review. Rape. Vergewaltigung in der Antike. G Doblhofer. The Classical Review 46 (2):327-329.
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  43. Edward M. Harris (1990). Did the Athenians Regard Seduction as a Worse Crime Than Rape? Classical Quarterly 40 (02):370-.
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  44. Jeffrey Hershfield (2004). The Threat of Acquaintance Rape. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):171-173.
  45. Donald C. Hubin & Karen Haely (1999). Rape and the Reasonable Man. Law and Philosophy 18 (2):113 - 139.
    Standards of reasonability play an important role in some of the most difficult cases of rape. In recent years, the notion of the reasonable person has supplanted the historical concept of the reasonable man as the test of reasonability. Contemporary feminist critics like Catharine MacKinnon and Kim Lane Scheppele have challenged the notion of the reasonable person on the grounds that reasonability standards are gendered to the ground and so, in practice, the reasonable person is just the reasonable man (...)
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  46. A. Hudson-Williams (1972). Claudian's Rape of Proserpine J. B. Hall: Claudian, De Raptu Proserpinae. (Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries, 11.) Pp. Ix + 252. Cambridge: University Press, 1969. Cloth, £4.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (01):42-44.
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  47. James H. Korn, Timothy J. Huelsman & Cynthia K. Shinabarger Reed (1992). Logic, Ethics, and Rhetoric of Research on Rape: A Reply to Mosher and Bond. Ethics and Behavior 2 (2):123 – 128.
    Mosher and Bond (this issue) suggest experimental designs that are not appropriate for the research purposes they criticize. In defending their own research, they make contradictory statements about the realism of their guided imagery procedure for simulating rape. They present data that we believe provide evidence for the possibility that wrongful harm occurred in their previous research. We assert our right to study the ethics of research and object to specious charges of having threatened sexual freedom and being associated with (...)
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  48. Jamess H. Korn, Timothy J. Huelsman, Cynthia K. Shinabarger Reed & Michelle Aiello (1992). Perceived Ethicality of Guided Imagery in Rape Research. Ethics and Behavior 2 (1):1 – 14.
    In our first study, undergraduate students (30 men, 30 women) evaluated the ethical acceptability of two previously published studies that used guided imagery in rape situations. In one, women imagined themselves as rape victims; in the other, men imagined themselves as rapist. Most students rated the research acceptable, but there was a significant interaction (g < .05): Women found the study of women as victim less ethical, and men found the study of men as rapist less ethical. In our second (...)
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  49. James Burges Lake (1991). Of Crime and Consequence: Should Newspapers Report Rape Complainants' Names? Journal of Mass Media Ethics 6 (2):106 – 118.
    Fear of public disclosure that will add to the humiliation of rape or other sexual assault is real for victims. In discussing this issue, cases for concealment and for disclosure are examined and suggestions are made for determining whether to publish names of victims.
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  50. Susan Lape (2001). Democratic Ideology and The Poetics of Rape in Menandrian Comedy. Classical Antiquity 20 (1):79-119.
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