This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
11 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Jonny Anomaly (2013). Collective Action and Individual Choice: Rethinking How We Regulate Narcotics and Antibiotics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):752-756.
    Governments across the globe have squandered treasure and imprisoned millions of their own citizens by criminalising the use and sale of recreational drugs. But use of these drugs has remained relatively constant, and the primary victims are the users themselves. Meanwhile, antimicrobial drugs that once had the power to cure infections are losing their ability to do so, compromising the health of people around the world. The thesis of this essay is that policymakers should stop wasting resources trying to fight (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Rem Edwards (1994). Why We Should Not Use Some Drugs for Pleasure. In S. Luper-Foy C. Brown (ed.), Drugs, Morality, and the Law. Garland. 183.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David S. Festinger, Kattiya Ratanadilok, Douglas B. Marlowe, Karen L. Dugosh, Nicholas S. Patapis & David S. DeMatteo (2007). Neuropsychological Functioning and Recall of Research Consent Information Among Drug Court Clients. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):163 – 186.
    Evidence suggests that research participants often fail to recall much of the information provided during the informed consent process. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of consent information recalled by drug court participants following a structured informed consent procedure and the neuropsychological factors that were related to recall. Eighty-five participants completed a standard informed consent procedure to participate in an ongoing research study, followed by a 17-item consent quiz and a brief neuropsychological battery 2 weeks later. Participants performed (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jessica Flanigan (2013). An Argument for Permitting Amphetamines and Instant Release Methylphenidate. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):49-51.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Cynthia Forlini & Eric Racine (2009). Autonomy and Coercion in Academic “Cognitive Enhancement” Using Methylphenidate: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 2 (3):163-177.
    There is mounting evidence that methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) is being used by healthy college students to improve concentration, alertness, and academic performance. One of the key concerns associated with such use of pharmaceuticals is the degree of freedom individuals have to engage in or abstain from cognitive enhancement (CE). From a pragmatic perspective, careful examination of the ethics of acts and contexts in which they arise includes considering coercion and social pressures to enhance cognition. We were interested in understanding how (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Larry Gostin (1990). Waging a War on Drug Users: An Alternative Public Health Vision. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (4):385-394.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Daniel Halliday (2011). Book Review: Jonathan Wolff, 'Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry'. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (2011.12.16).
  8. D. Hawks (ed.) (1993). What Are the Proper Limits for Government Intervention in Our Lifestyles?: A Symposium Jointly Convened by the National Centre for Research Into the Prevention of Drug Abuse and the Kingswood Centre for Applied Ethics. Curtin University of Technology.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Douglas N. Husak (1989). Recreational Drugs and Paternalism. Law and Philosophy 8 (3):353 - 381.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Rick Momeyer (2000). Heavy Drinking on Campus and University Paternalism. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):147-151.
    Both for reasons of their own and because of congressionally mandated changes in the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, many colleges and universities have changed the way they deal with alcohol abuse by their students. One of these changes has been to adopt a policy of “Parental Notification” according to which parents of an underaged student found guilty of consuming alcohol are notified after a first offense. I argue that this is a paternalistic policy in need of justification, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Tuomas E. Tahko (2010). Reefer Madness: Cannabis, the Individual, and Public Policy. In Dale Jaquette (ed.), Cannabis and Philosophy: What Were We Just Talking About? Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper is a survey of the positive and negative aspects of cannabis use from the point of view of the individual on one hand and from the point of view of the society on the other hand. Health, social, and political motives are all discussed, and the best method of harm reduction is analysed. The upshot is that zero tolerance policy is obsolete, and that most individuals would be better off using cannabis rather than other drugs.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation