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  1. Daniele Bertini (2012). Incompletezza normativa, inconsistenza normativa e responsabilità dell'agente nell'etica religiosa. Lo Sguardo 8 (1).
    My paper addresses the notion of moral responsibility in religious ethics. I begin with the outline of the doctrine of moral heteronomy. The scripture stories of the Tables of the Laws and the Holy Covenant provide the general pattern for heteronomic ethics. My claim is that heteronomic ethics transfers the responsibility for the action A an agent x is performing from x to the normative system commanding x to perform A. I then picture the architecture of the normative system of (...)
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  2. Marc A. Cohen (2016). The Movement From Ethics to Social Relationships for Levinas, and Why Decency Obscures Obligation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 79 (2):89-100.
    According to Emmanuel Levinas, the individual bears an infinite obligation to the other person. In the Talmudic reading “Judaism and revolution,” Levinas suggests that we move from the ethical encounter to social relationships using contracts—both particular contracts and the social contract. So social relationships are created by limiting obligation, and as a result these relationships can only be practically acceptable, not ethical. Jewish religious practice for Levinas should also be understood as a set of negotiated limits to our infinite obligation.
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  3. Rem B. Edwards, Identification Ethics and Spirituality.
    This article explores a form of ethics and spirituality based on the nearly universal but often undeveloped human capacity for identifying self with others and with non-personal values. It begins with commonplace non-moral identification experiences, then describes identification with others in ethical and spiritual unions. Freud’s psychological emphasis on identification is linked with ethics and spirituality, though Freud would have objected. Robert S. Hartman’s three kinds of goodness—systemic, extrinsic, and intrinsic—are applied to abundant ethical and spiritual living through identification. Intrinsic (...)
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  4. Guranāma Kaura (ed.) (1998). The Sikh Perspective of Human Values. Publication Bureau, Punjabi University.
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  5. Adam J. Kolber (2010). Alternative Burdens on Freedom of Conscience. San Diego Law Review 47:919-934.
    We sometimes exempt people from generally applicable laws when compliance would violate their rights of conscience. In “The Significance of Conscience,” Kent Greenawalt discusses a variety of issues about the proper scope and subject matter of claims of conscience. He argues that we should generally give nonreligious claims comparable treatment to religious claims but argues further that there are special reasons to accommodate religious claims that ought to factor into our deliberations. In this brief comment, I discuss Greenawalt’s analysis and (...)
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  6. Katarina Komenska (2012). Predrag Cicovacki (2009): Albert Schweitzer’s Ethical Vision. A Sourcebook (New York: Oxford University Press). [REVIEW] Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 2 (3-4):222-226.
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  7. David McPherson (2016). Nietzsche, Cosmodicy, and the Saintly Ideal. Philosophy 91 (1):39-67.
    In this essay I examine Nietzsche’s shifting understanding of the saintly ideal with an aim to bringing out its philosophical importance, particularly with respect to what I call the problem of ‘cosmodicy’, i.e., the problem of justifying life in the world as worthwhile in light of the prevalent reality of suffering. In his early account Nietzsche understood the saint as embodying the supreme achievement of a self-transcending ‘feeling of oneness and identity with all living things’, while in his later account (...)
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  8. Richard Oxenberg, Retributivism and Outraged Love: A Search for the Heart of Retributive Justice.
    "An eye for an eye will make the whole world blind." This quote, often attributed to Gandhi, suggests the illegitimacy of the retributive urge. On the other hand, many feel a strong intuitive sense that "justice must be served" and that violators of justice must be fittingly punished. In this paper I examine the urge for retributive justice and argue that, at its base, it is rooted in a profound desire to have a wrongdoer see the nature of his or (...)
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  9. Millard Schumaker (1992). Sharing Without Reckoning: Imperfect Right and the Norms of Reciprocity. Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion/Corporation Canadienne des Sciences Religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  10. Josef Seifert (1994). Intrinsic Right - Intrinsic Wrong?: A Critical Examination of an Old Ethical Debate in Contemporary German Theology. Cogito 8 (3):255-264.
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  11. Nripinder Singh (1990). The Sikh Moral Tradition: Ethical Perceptions of the Sikhs in the Late Nineteenth/Early Twentieth Century. Manohar.
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  12. Santokh Singh (1981). Philosophical Foundations of the Sikh Value System. Munshiram Manoharlal.
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  13. Saul Smilansky (2012). A Problem About the Morality of Some Common Forms of Prayer. Ratio 25 (2):207-215.
    At a time of acute danger, people commonly petition God for help for themselves or their loved ones; such as praying that an avalanche heading in one's direction be diverted, or that an organ donor be found for one's dying child. Such prayer seems natural and, indeed, for believers, reasonable and acceptable. It seems perverse to condemn such typical prayer, as wrong. But once we closely examine what is actually happening in such situations, we shall see that frequently prayer of (...)
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  14. Jussi Suikkanen (2015). Review of Erik Wielenberg's Robust Ethics: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Godless Normative Realism. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (2):541-545.
    This article is a short book review of Erik Wielenberg's book Robust Ethics: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Godless Normative Realism.
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  15. Luke Taylor (2016). Can Robert Adams Survive Moral Twin Earth? Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (2):334-351.
    Richard Boyd and Robert Adams have both developed semantic accounts of moral terms based on Hilary Putnam's causal regulation theory for natural kind terms, according to which the terms in question refer to the properties which predominantly causally regulated the terms. However, Terence Horgan and Mark Timmons have mounted an objection to Boyd's semantics—their Moral Twin Earth argument. If this argument is successful against Boyd then it might be thought that it should also be successful against Adams, given the similarity (...)
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  16. Ryan West (2015). Contempt and the Cultivation of Character. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):493-519.
    Macalester Bell urges the cultivation of apt contempt as the best response to what she calls “the vices of superiority”. In this essay, I sketch two character profiles. The first—the ideal contemnor—paradigmatically answers the vices of superiority with contempt. The second—the ideal Christian neighbor—is marked by humility and love, and answers the vices of superiority in non-contemptuous ways. I argue that the latter character rivals the former as a fitting moral response to the vices of superiority. Furthermore, I argue that (...)
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