This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
1924 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 1924
Material to categorize
  1. Jacob ben Masoud Abi-Ḥasira (2006). Sefer Elef Binah: Torah Ṿe-Ḥokhmah U-Musar. Yeshivat Abir Yaʻaḳov, or MeʼIr Śimḥah.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jacob ben Masoud Abi-Ḥasira (2004). Sefer Shaʻare Arukhah: Divre Musar Kevushin le-Yamim Noraʼim. Hotsaʼat Ha-Makhon le-Hotsaʼat Sefarim She-ʻa. Y. Yeshivat Ner Yitsḥaḳ.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jacob ben Masoud Abi-Ḥasira (2000). Sefer Penine Abir Yaʻaḳov: Leḳeṭ Peninim, Amarot, Ḥidushim ... Ha-Mevusas ʻal Divre Musar .. Mekhon Avraham.
    [1] Hagadah shel Pesaḥ -- [2] Pirḳe Avot -- [3] Mishle -- [4] Shir ha-shirim -- [5] Megilat Ḳohelet -- 6. Megilat Ekhah -- [7] Megilat Rut -- [8] Sefer Tehilim.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jacob ben Masoud Abi-Ḥasira (2000). Sefer Penine Abir Yaʻaḳov: Leḳeṭ Peninim, Amarot, Ḥidushim. Mekhon Avraham.
    [1] Hagadah shel Pesaḥ -- [2] Pirḳe Avot -- [3] Mishle -- [4] Shir ha-shirim -- [5] Megilat Ḳohelet -- 6. Megilat Ekhah -- [7] Megilat Rut -- [8] Sefer Tehilim.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Isaac Aboab (2008). Sefer Menorat Ha-Maʼor: Le-Shabatot U-Moʻadim: Menuḳad ʻal-Pi Masoret Yehude Teman .. Śagiv Maḥfud.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Mohammed Abu‐Nimer & Ilham Nasser (2013). Forgiveness in The Arab and Islamic Contexts. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (3):474-494.
    This essay explores the current and historical meaning of forgiveness in Arab and Islamic cultural and religious contexts. It also hopes to encourage further empirical research on this understudied topic in both religious and peacebuilding studies. In addition to the perceived meaning of forgiveness in an Arab Islamic context, this essay examines the links between forgiveness and reconciliation. Relying on religious sources including the Qur'an and Hadith, as well as certain events in Islamic history, the essay identifies various ways to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Don Adams (1994). Loving God and One's Neighbor. Faith and Philosophy 11 (2):207-223.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Merrihew Adams (2000). Reading the Silences, Questioning the Terms: A Response to the Focus on Eighteenth-Century Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):281 - 284.
    It is striking that most of the essays in this Focus do not explore the specifically religious aspects of Enlightenment ethical thought. A principled reason for this may be found in a conception of religion that makes it hard for Enlightenment thinkers to seem religious at all. Neither does this conception fit anything that is likely to be a live option for most people today, and the now prevalent unpopularity of eighteenth-century piety and religious thought may blind us to important (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert Merrihew Adams (1995). Moral Horror and the Sacred. Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (2):201 - 224.
    The sense of moral horror at certain deeds and the related idea of the sacred have not been given as central a place in ethical theory, theological or secular, as they have in our moral consciousness. I place them in a broader theological metaethics, in a way that I hope avoids mere taboo and provides for a rational critique of our responses. Moral horror is understood here in terms of violation of the sacred, and the sacred is understood in terms (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Merrihew Adams (1993). Prospects for a Metaethical Argument for Theism: A Response to Stephen J. Sullivan. Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (2):313 - 318.
    Disagreements about the success of any given argument often arise because the suppositions of the critic differ from the suppositions of the author of the argument. In maintaining the plausibility of a metaethical argument for theism against the objections articulated by Stephen J. Sullivan, I will probe our differing suppositions with regard to the relation of theological to naturalistic metaethical theories, the starting point for the metaethical argument for theism, and the relation of the qualities of God's will to our (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Merrihew Adams (1980). Pure Love. Journal of Religious Ethics 8 (1):83 - 99.
    The place of self-concern in Christian love is studied, beginning with Fénelon's extreme claim that in perfect love for God one would desire nothing for its own sake except that God's will be done. This view is criticized. A distinction is made between self-interest (desire for one's own good for its own sake) and other sorts of self-concern; and it is argued that self-concern has an important role in the Christian virtues, but that self-interest has a less important role than (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert Merrihew Adams (1979). Divine Command Metaethics Modified Again. Journal of Religious Ethics 7 (1):66 - 79.
    This essay presents a version of divine command metaethics inspired by recent work of Donnellan, Kripke, and Putnam on the relation between necessity and conceptual analysis. What we can discover a priori, by conceptual analysis, about the nature of ethical wrongness is that wrongness is the property of actions that best fills a certain role. What property that is cannot be discovered by conceptual analysis. But I suggest that theists should claim it is the property of being contrary to the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Asma Afsaruddin (2009). The Hermeneutics of Inter-Faith Relations: Retrieving Moderation and Pluralism as Universal Principles in Qur'anic Exegeses. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):331-354.
    This article discusses the exegeses of two Qur'anic verses: Qur'an 2:143, which describes righteous Muslims as constituting a "middle/moderate community" ( umma wasat ) and Qur'an 5:66, which similarly describes righteous Jews and Christians as constituting a "balanced/moderate community" ( umma muqtasida ). Taken together, these verses clearly suggest that it is subscription to some common standard of righteousness and ethical conduct that determines the salvific nature of a religious community and not the denominational label it chooses to wear. Such (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Rumee Ahmed (2011). The Ethics of Prophetic Disobedience: Qur'an 8:67 at the Crossroads of Islamic Sciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):440-457.
    Medieval Muslim scholars were challenged with squaring their conceptions of prophetic infallibility with reports that Muhammad disobeyed revelatory commands from God. The manner in which they rehabilitated the prophetic image in these cases had corresponding repercussions in the fields of jurisprudence, theology, and legal theory. The present article uses the case of Q. 8:67 to demonstrate the intertwined nature of the Islamic sciences and the stakes involved when delimiting the prophetic ability to err and/or disobey God.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Rumee Ahmed (2011). The Lash is Mightier Than the Sword1: Torture and Citizenry in Medieval Muslim Jurisprudence. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):606-612.
    Medieval Muslim scholars unequivocally prohibited the torture of prisoners of war out of a concern for maintaining theoretical constructs about the boundaries of the Muslim and non-Muslim communities. Muslim scholars worried that the torturing prisoners of war would compromise values and ideals predicated on such constructs, and that the demands of citizenship trumped any benefit to the Muslim community that might accrue from torture.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ilsup Ahn (2012). Between Mt. Moriah and Mt. Golgotha: How is Christian Ethics Possible? Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):629-652.
    In this paper, I explore a new way of understanding Christian ethics by critically interconnecting the theological meanings of the Aqedah ("binding") narrative of Mt. Moriah and the Passion story of Mt. Golgotha. Through an in-depth critical-theological investigation of the relation between these two biblical events, I argue that Christian ethics is possible not so much as a moralization or as a literalistic divine command theory, but rather as a "covenantal-existential" response to God's will in the impossible love on Mt. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ilsup Ahn (2010). Economy of "Invisible Debt" and Ethics of "Radical Hospitality": Toward a Paradigm Change of Hospitality From "Gift" to "Forgiveness". Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (2):243-267.
    The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct a Christian theology of “hospitality” through a critical reading of Jacques Derrida and Friedrich Nietzsche as well as through an in-depth biblical and theological reflection on the ethics of hospitality. Out of this reconstructive investigation, I propose a new Christian ethics of hospitality as a radical kind. As a new paradigm, this radical hospitality is distinguished from other types in that it is no longer conceived on the model of “gift”. The new (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ismaʼil R. Al-Faruqi (1967/1968). Christian Ethics. The Hague, Djambatan.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Israel ibn Al-Nakawa (2010). Menorat Ha-Maʼor Ha-Ḳadmon. Hafatsah, Ha-Sifriyah Ha-Sefaradit.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Kecia Ali (2011). The Disobedient Prophet in Muslim Thought: Exploring History and Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):391-398.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Shabbir M. H. Alibhai (2008). The Duty to Feed in Cases of Advanced Dementia. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):37-52.
    Cases of dementia present us with difficult ethical dilemmas as we strive to care for those unable to care for themselves. In this article, I review the relevant Islamic texts on caring for the ill, alleviating suffering, and feeding the hungry-all in light of the modern clinical environment. I find that the ethical appropriateness of tube feeding at the end of life is not as clear-cut as it may seem. My analysis, however, suggests that Muslim scholars ought to favor insertion (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Shabbir M. H. Alibhai (2008). The Duty to Feed in Cases of Advanced Dementia. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):37-52.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Joseph L. Allen (1974). A Theological Approach to Moral Rights. Journal of Religious Ethics 2 (1):119 - 141.
    In seeking to determine what place, if any, the concept of moral rights can and/or should have in theological ethics, it is first necessary to clarify the nature of the concept. On this task contemporary moral philosophy is found to be especially helpful. It is then suggested that from a theological standpoint an appeal to moral rights might be justified by reference to (1) the moral fabric of persons under God, (2) the worth of persons as ends, and (3) the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Richard C. Allen (1993). When Narrative Fails. Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (1):27 - 67.
    This essay examines the ways narratives succeed or fail to provide a life with structure and direction, as exemplified in Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" and George Eliot's "Middlemarch". Whether a narrative can be a moral compass depends on the presence of what Eliot calls "a coherent social faith." The debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine provides a framework for my analysis of the problematic status of such a social faith in the modern world. This analysis in turn sheds (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Thomas J. J. Altizer (2009). The Revolutionary Vision of William Blake. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):33-38.
    It was William Blake's insight that the Christian churches, by inverting the Incarnation and the dialectical vision of Paul, have repressed the body, divided God from creation, substituted judgment for grace, and repudiated imagination, compassion, and the original apocalyptic faith of early Christianity. Blake's prophetic poetry thus contributes to the renewal of Christian ethics by a process of subversion and negation of Christian moral, ecclesiastical, and theological traditions, which are recognized precisely as inversions of Jesus, and therefore as instances of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John J. Anderson (2013). A Critique of the Identity/Act Distinction in Protestant Ordination Policies. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):601-625.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John J. Anderson (2013). The Rhetoric of Homosexual Practice. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):601-625.
    Many Protestant denominations have or recently had policies that prohibit “self-avowed practicing homosexuals” from being ordained. By only prohibiting “practicing” homosexuals, proponents of these policies claim that they do not discriminate against homosexuals as a group since, technically, a homosexual can still be ordained as long as she is “non-practicing.” In other words, a condemnation of homosexual practice is not the same as a condemnation of homosexual persons. I argue that this is not the case; the rhetoric of homosexual practice (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Barbara Hilkert Andolsen (1981). Agape in Feminist Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 9 (1):69 - 83.
    The role of agape in Christian ethics has been a major concern for twentieth century ethicists. In America, the dominant ethical position has stressed other-regard--often pressed to the point of significant personal sacrifice--as the content of agape. Feminist ethicists are now criticizing an exclusive emphasis on other-regard. They are stressing the need for a healthy self-regard and hence they are exploring mutuality as the most appropriate image of Christian love.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Maria Antonaccio (2004). Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):3-12.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Maria Antonaccio (2001). The Virtues of Metaphysics: A Review of Iris Murdoch's Philosophical Writings. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):307 - 335.
    Iris Murdoch's moral philosophy has long influenced contemporary ethics, yet it has not, in general, received the kind of sustained critical attention that it deserves. "Existentialists and Mystics" and "Metaphysics as a Guide to Morals" provide new access to most of Murdoch's philosophical writings and make possible a deeper appreciation of her contribution to current thought. After assessing the recent critical reception of Murdoch's thought, this review places her moral philosophy in the context of contemporary trends in ethics by tracing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Harold W. Attridge (2009). Wolterstorff, Rights, Wrongs, and the Bible. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):209-219.
    According to Wolterstorff, an accurate genealogy of rights begins, not with the late Middle Ages and the Enlightenment, but with the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. The Gospel of Luke, Wolterstorff says, provides especially important witness, and he gives it considerable attention. Wolterstorff's careful analysis of Luke is both lexical and narratological. This paper argues that the lexical data of the Gospel of Luke does indeed lend some support to Wolterstorff's case. But the support is qualified since, in Luke, a critical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert Audi (2011). Faith, Faithfulness, and Virtue. Faith and Philosophy 28 (3):294-309.
    The concept of faith is central in the philosophy of religion, and the concept of virtue is central in ethics. Both can be clarified by exploring their relationshipswith each other and their connection with conduct, reasons for action, and the good. One important question is whether faith is a virtue. Answering this requires at least a partial account of what constitutes faith and of what makes a characteristic a virtue. The answer also depends on whether we are speaking of religious (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Avraham (1984). Sefer Yesod Ha-ʻavodah: Hu Yesod ʻavodat Ish Ha-Yiśreʼeli Ba-ʻavodat Ha-Ḳodesh .. Mosdot Ḥaside Slonim "BeʼEr Avraham".
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Wes Avram (1996). On the Priority of 'Ethics' in the Work of Levinas. Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):261 - 284.
    This essay interprets the implications of Levinas's idea of a pre-philosophical ethics for the discourses of philosophy and theology, and it suggests that his work pushes philosophy and theology, and the ethics they bear, beyond the modern division of theory and practice. This view defines the ethical according to a rhythm of ontological interpretation of human action and sheer meontological responsiveness between acting persons. This rhythm becomes discernible in a creative form of moral praxis uniting philosophy, theology, and traditional ethics (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Hayyim Joseph David Azulai (1794/2008). Sefer Lev Daṿid: 32 Pirḳe Tokheḥot Musar Meʻorere Ha-Levavot la-ʻavodat H. Hotsaʼat Ahavat Shalom, Yad ShemuʼEl Franḳo.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Helmut David Baer (1996). The Fruit of Charity: Using the Neighbor in "De Doctrina Christiana". Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (1):47 - 64.
    Augustine's treatment of neighbor-love in De doctrina Christiana has been the subject of much criticism in twentieth-century scholarship. Specifically, Augustine is criticized for reducing neighbor-love to an instrumental "use" of the neighbor as a tool in one's personal project of salvation. This paper argues that careful attention to the relationship between Christ and the uti-frui distinction in book 1 of De doctrina reveals a much different conception of "use." Far from advancing an instrumental treatment of the other, Augustine, when he (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Helmut David Baer & Joseph E. Capizzi (2005). Just War Theories Reconsidered: Problems with Prima Facie Duties and the Need for a Political Ethic. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (1):119-137.
    This essay challenges a "meta-theory" in just war analysis that purports to bridge the divide between just war and pacifism. According to the meta-theory, just war and pacifism share a common presumption against killing that can be overridden only under conditions stipulated by the just war criteria. Proponents of this meta-theory purport that their interpretation leads to ecumenical consensus between "just warriors" and pacifists, and makes the just war theory more effective in reducing recourse to war. Engagement with the new (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. D. Baggett (2001). William James' Reduction of Religion to Standard Morality-A Reply to FJ Ruf. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):341-342.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. David Baggett (2001). Comment by James Turner Johnson. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):507-511.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David Baggett (2001). Letter From David R. Loy. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):505-507.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David Baggett (2001). >Reply by David Baggett. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):341-342.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. David Baggett (2000). On a Reductionist Analysis of William James's Philosophy of Religion. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):423 - 448.
    William James undertook to steer his way between a rationalistic system that was not empirical enough and an empirical system so materialistic that it could not account for the value commitments on which it rested. In arguing against both the absolutists (gnostics) and the empiricists (agnostics), he defined a position of pluralistic moralism that seemed equally distant from both, leaving himself vulnerable to the criticism that he had rescued morality from scientism only by reducing religion to morals. Such criticism, however, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Greg L. Bahnsen (1984). Theonomy in Christian Ethics. Presbyterian and Reformed Pub. Co..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Wesley C. Baker (1967). The Open End of Christian Morals. Philadelphia, Westminister Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. William A. Barbieri Jr (2002). The Heterological Quest: Michel de Certeau's Travel Narratives and the "Other" of Comparative Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (1):23-48.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Henlee H. [from old catalog] Barnette (1961). Introducing Christian Ethics. Nashville, Broadman Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Elizabeth A. Barre (2012). Muslim Imaginaries and Imaginary Muslims: Placing Islam in Conversation with a Secular Age. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):138-148.
    This essay begins by exploring the extent to which the narrative of secularization presented in Charles Taylor's A Secular Age might be complicated or otherwise challenged by taking account of parallel processes within Islamic thought and practice. It then considers whether Taylor's argument might nevertheless be applicable to, or illuminative of, contemporary struggles with modernity in the Muslim world.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Albino Barrera (2005). Economic Compulsion and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Markets can often be harsh in compelling people to make unpalatable economic choices any reasonable person would not take under normal conditions. Thus workers laid off in mid-career accept lower paid jobs that are beneath their professional experience for want of better alternatives. Economic migrants leave their families and cross borders (legally or illegally) in search of a livelihood and countless Third World families rely on child labor to supplement meagre household incomes. These are examples of economic compulsion, an all-too-frequent (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Albino Barrera (1999). The Evolution of Social Ethics: Using Economic History to Understand Economic Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):285 - 304.
    In the development of Roman Catholic social thought from the teachings of the scholastics to the modern social encyclicals, changes in normative economics reflect the transformation of an economic terrain from its feudal roots to the modern industrial economy. The preeminence accorded by the modern market to the allocative over the distributive function of price broke the convenient convergence of commutative and distributive justice in scholastic just price theory. Furthermore, the loss of custom, law, and usage in defining the boundaries (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1924